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Israeli Literature - Shared screen with speaker view
Baruch Frydman-Kohl
22:58
what was name of mountain?
Elizabeth
23:13
Masada
Tova Shimon
25:52
it is almost prophetic Peduyei Shevi
Brenda Horowitz
26:51
It already was in line 2 - “prisoners”
Lawrence Kaplan
26:53
Bialik? Meitei Midbar?
terrytaffer
28:05
what year was it written?
Sarah Schachter
28:30
1914
Violet
31:04
what year was the broadcast?
Elizabeth
31:36
Actually not sure it was Masada...
Tova Shimon
32:03
What a wonderful treat to hear the 3 v!
Lawrence Kaplan
32:38
I still like th most fnos version the best.
Madene Shachar
36:36
As a young American woman living in Israel, when I heard this song for the first time I was very disgusted and amazed that my husband and all the Israelis I know loved this song and danced to it and they could not understand why I thought the song was so discriminating (like many other famous and popular songs from this period)
Linda Henry Goodman
37:29
There was a line in "Goodbye Girl" where Richard Dreyfuss says to Marsha Mason, "you say no no, but there's yes yes in your eyes." ………….
Kitty Hoffman
37:50
Of course this is dreadful. But in truth the pop songs in N. America were no better, and even the supposedly ‘hip’ groups like the Rolling Stones etc…and now we have rap and hip hop.
Susan Mayer
38:51
It's the same with the Bruce Springstein song Fire, which is even worse. Something like the Your lips say No, but your eyes tell me yes.
Lawrence Kaplan
40:05
But now "No means no" is not sufficient for many. Rather many say the woman has to explicitly say 'yes."
Susan Mayer
41:14
Here are the Bruce Springsteen lyrics:
Sarilyn's iPhone
41:42
al tikrah li Matilda, Corine alal,was she inspired by this?
Susan Mayer
41:43
I'm driving in my carI turn on the radioI'm pulling you closeYou just say noYou say you don't like itBut girl I know you're a liar'Cause when we kissOoh, fire
Sarilyn's iPhone
42:10
al tikrah li matuk
Sigalit Davis
42:32
Composer felt terrible and added a new verse - she meant NO when she said no
Susan Mayer
43:24
Yes, I agree times change and we all feel regret for things before we understood...
stanleykay
48:53
but when he composed it, how could he possibly think it would be interpreted in any other way!!!!!
Judith Sharon
49:14
1940s song popular by Eddy Howard: lips tell me no, no But there's yes, yes in your eyes I've been missin your kissin Just because I wasn't wise I'll stop my scheming… …and dreaming Cause I realize Your lips tell me no, no But there's yes, yes in your eyes I never knew just what to do You had me… …fooled somehow You made me guess, but I confess I know your secret now Your lips tell me no, no But there's yes, yes in your eyes…
Brenda Horowitz
49:25
the boys were acquitted in the original trial
stanleykay
50:03
tier he should have said stop singing it!!!!
Judy Hollander
52:14
Baby it’s cold outside says the same thing
stanleykay
53:10
BUt this is SO much more explicit? What did he think he meant when he composed it
lauren shachar
54:05
This poster was with me al through University years in the early Seventies in Boston. I saved it for years. Wonderful memory.
Judy Hollander
55:49
and Song of Songs is about Israel, hum
Madene Shachar
55:57
I am not a man, so I can only give my female perspective Stanley, but I believe that men approach relationships with a woman with a sense of confusion, mixed messages, confusion...that first kiss, that first hand-in-hand...and the song tried to convey this, but...
Joe Lowin
56:23
What would happen if the pronoun were in the masculine? ke she-hu omer lo... If you are dealing with the Israeli bureaucracy , you learn very soon as I did during a sabbatical year in Israel that "The first no doesn't count."
susanspitz
58:06
Unbelievable that they were acquitted initially. She apparently consented to be gang raped.
Lawrence Kaplan
58:14
But what happens when the man ignortes soed no or the tghird?
Lawrence Kaplan
59:00
the man ignores the second "no" or the 'third"?
Madene Shachar
59:14
Joe, If it was a woman asking the question, she would be considered "promiscuous"
Judy Hollander
59:31
brilliant
Baruch Frydman-Kohl
01:01:52
was there a subsequent conviction?
sharonheim@hotmail.com
01:03:01
what year did Naomi Shemer write this?
Lawrence Kaplan
01:03:37
Susanspitz: I assume they were originally acquitted not because she consented, but because supposedly the young men could not be expected to realize she was actually refusing, Either way, it's terrible. In any event, verdict was overturned.
Judy Siegal
01:04:15
In both songs, the music is very catching, which probably contributes to their popularity.
Lawrence Kaplan
01:04:24
Baruch: That was the decision of Justice Chessin.
jeremy
01:04:28
1966, I believe
Lawrence Kaplan
01:08:34
In Flanders field the poppies grow
Frona Kahn
01:08:50
The killing fields-Vietnam
Steven Broder
01:10:25
No, in Cambodia
Sorrel Kerbel
01:11:23
pumpkin flowers in Lebanon - Friedman ...
Baruch Frydman-Kohl
01:12:25
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/matti-friedman/songs-for-the-dead_b_14732870.html
Mitch Slomiak
01:12:31
Where Have All the Flower Gone? Gone to soldiers everyone one (Bob Dylan)
Baruch Frydman-Kohl
01:12:37
flower songs in Israel
Sarilyn's iPhone
01:13:08
yes Mitch!!
stanleykay
01:13:18
\Madene- “Stanley” is actually Joanne, quite female!
Linda Henry Goodman
01:13:26
Who was that singing just now please?
fredi
01:14:23
dorit reuveni
Elinoar Almagor’s iPad
01:14:41
Thank you from Dan for recognizing his more controversial works here. his daughter (Elinoar:and granddaughter (Avigail) are enjoying the class
Erica Sokoloff
01:15:43
Wow!:)
Lawrence Kaplan
01:16:17
Like Woody Allen and Marshall Mcluhan
susanspitz
01:18:10
-yes. Wow!
Judy Siegal
01:18:49
Such an interesting juxtaposition of the tone of the poem and the music.
Lawrence Kaplan
01:19:27
I'm not sure it works.
Sorrel Kerbel
01:19:48
from sorrel - remember what was done to us, and do unto others what you would like done to you.
Judy Hollander
01:20:11
all those akidah poems that equate sending our sons to war as a sacrifice like Issac
sharonheim@hotmail.com
01:20:35
Torah reading on Shabbat Zachor before Purim.
Lawrence Kaplan
01:21:01
I was referring to the juxtaposition of words and music
Marion Stein
01:21:15
Shabbat Shalom, everyone, I have to go. Marion
DEBRA GLAZER
01:21:29
Re Sorel's comment on “pumpkin flower” by Matti Friedman, my understanding is that that is code used in IDF opertions for a 'wounded soldier”.
Joni Schockett
01:21:44
extraordinary. NBC
Tova Shimon
01:22:34
Toda Rabba Shabbat Shalom
Judy Avnery
01:22:36
תודה רחל
Mj Levison
01:22:48
where have all the flowers gone was not dylan. it was Pete Seeger and weavers and by Peter Paul. sand Mary
Harriet Wolpoff
01:23:04
Imperatives was a very interesting theme. Todah rabah.
gila
01:23:06
Thank you so much, Rachel!
Eli Havivi’s iPhone
01:23:16
thank you Rachel. Shabbat shalom!
Joni Schockett
01:23:30
sorry. typo. Extraordinary class that shows how poetry and literature are reflections of culture and society. What was once acceptable becomes unacceptable as cultural norms shift. This poem beautifully illustrates exactly that. Thanks for the beautiful analysis!!
Mitch Slomiak
01:23:36
I stand corrected on Where Have All the Flowers Gone. It was indeed Pete Seeger
Jon Tepper
01:23:36
AS always, Todah Rabbah, Rachel...What a week!
Mj Levison
01:23:53
Yom yerushalaim sameach
Rhea Dorn
01:28:28
Thank you for bringing this to us. We know and often do not speak.
ehpressmang@gmail.com
01:45:07
Shabbat Shalom L’kulam!
Kitty Hoffman
01:46:37
As always, todah rabba v’ shabbat shalom!
Kitty Hoffman
01:58:26
shabbat shalom!