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BioME Virtual Coffee Hour - Shared screen with speaker view
Agnieszka Carpenter
17:14
Good morning everyone and welcome to our Coffee Hour, October edition. If you have a question to any of the panelists, please type it in the chat or raise your virtual hand during the Q&A session that will start after all 4 presentations. Enjoy the event!
Stephen Pelsue
25:58
Do you have any experience developing readers for fluorescent Lateral Flow Assay detection> What are the challenges?
Nathaniel Whitney
27:11
long history in IVD and over 20 years working with Chinese companies. Abbott can help.
Dan Gray
30:43
Hi Stephen, thanks for the question - yes we do have experience in lateral flow systems. Common challenges are proper focus of the reader camera and specification of the camera pixel size related to SNR requirements.
Rep. Lois Galgay Reckitt
38:09
Is there any research on the relation patients being treated for MS?
Katie Motyl
43:18
MS is not my area of expertise, but there is certainly evidence of increased fracture risk that could be due to a variety of factors, including inflammation, immobility and pharmacologic treatments.
Kristy Townsend
59:18
Katie and Sue - your work is very translatable to animal and human health. How do you navigate the movement of your science from the “bench” to applications in healthcare environments (animal or human)? (PS: loved all 4 presentations today, these coffee hours are so fun!)
Sue Ishaq
01:05:10
Hi Kristy! et al., Starting from an animal system allows us to make comparisons that aren't possible in humans, because we have "domesticated" ourselves. We don't have a good idea of what our "wild microbiome" might look. When we want to investigate the role of microbes in human disease, using those animal models first allows us to tease out the question of nature vs. nurture.
Paul Fitzpatrick
01:09:17
great virtual coffee hour!
Paul Fitzpatrick
01:09:20
thanks