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GJB Book Club: Video Conference with Ellen Cassedy - Shared screen with gallery view
DEBRA GLAZER
13:40
When will Ellen be able to translate more stories by Yenta Mash? I absolutely loved these - some of the best stories that I've read in a long while, and so nicely translated!!
Marsha Kazman
16:40
This is directed to Ellen. I understand that translating entails decisions. I am just curious, why you chose to leave out the mice simile at the end of the story Birdgroom Tree?
Alegría Baltodano Zomer
21:22
Hello. I loved this collection. Are there more stories by Mash?
Avi
32:31
Do you find any connection with your translation work with your own labor activism, and if so were you drawn to Yenta Mash and Blume Lempel for at least in part for that reason?
Gail
35:53
Please let this Book Club know when you're memoir is published,
Elaine Elinson
36:41
I am fascinated by your delving into using the Ukrainian word “chunyes” and all its implications. Can you speak more generally about when you use an original word — and provide a context for the reader to understand — or when you translate? How about conversation, greetings?
DEBRA GLAZER
36:42
Did Yenta ever speak about literary influences on her work/ other contemporary writers?
Rosaline Horowitz
37:30
I would like to thank you so much for your translation work which for me has opened up a whole new world of women's literature. Do you know what the original response was to Mash's published work to Yiddish readers?
Alegría Baltodano Zomer
41:52
The tone of Lempel is so different from Mash, did the translation feel so different as well?
Avi
42:49
Mash’s fiction seems to draw so much from her own autobiography. How much would you recommend a reader to approach that autobiographical element, or should a reader not think like that?
Gail
43:32
Can you share with us how you approached learning Yiddish? I am taking a class now and I find it very challenging to learn a language at 66 even though I know many words and phrases.
Avi
45:32
Yenta Mash was, I believe part of a small but notable circle of Yiddish writers from what is now Moldova.
Susan S
51:41
I connect with the writer's voice when I read. How do you as a translator reflect the voice?
Josh Holden (he/him/his)
51:43
I really just enjoyed the stories in a way that I don't always with "great literature".
Elaine Elinson
52:07
When working with your co-translator, how do you divide the work?
Susan Denniston
52:37
I learned about Jews being sent to Siberia from this book and all the hardships that ensued. I loved the ironies and humor in the stories!
DEBRA GLAZER
53:06
In the Seder story, when the characters invoke the traditional prayers, they often invert them. For example, dayenu thanks God for performing so many deeds, but Yenta says "if God had only exiled us and not separated us from the men - dayenu". Reminds me a bit of Tevye arguing with God by misquoting Biblical texts or taking them out of context. Brilliant way to show how immersed the characters were in Jewish tradition but still willing to challenge God for all his misdeeds.
Helen Schulman
53:07
My good friend Ida escaped into Siberia with her family during the war. Her stories are so similar to Yenta Mash. She shares them freely. Thank you so much for the beautiful translation that was so true to the Yiddish I know. I loved the choice of stories.
Amy Waldman
53:34
I came into it with no expectations, but it opened up a whole new corner of Jewish life for me. I thought Mash had such a gift for showing both the global and the intimate, and that’s not something that’s easy to do and she made it look easy. You made it easy (POSSIBLE!) for us to experience, so thank you. Also, at the same time I was reading Helen Fremont’s book “After Long Silence,” which illuminated some of what Mash was depicting in her fiction set in Siberia.
Jesse Abraham
54:29
The stories were wonderfully accessible, no doubt helped by the translation. So familiar, so one could just learn about the world from them and not get stuck on the foreigness. I appreciated the YBC recording of an interview with her to get a better sense of who she was. She’s more an observer than a teller of personal stories.
Elaine Elinson
55:58
With the lens of a woman’s perspective — Mash gives us a very different (and very welcome and interesting) view of history — a women’s labor camp in Siberia, who knew? Older Jewish refugees dissatisfied with life in Israel — something we don’t hear about too much. Love that she shakes up our understanding of history via fiction.
Selma Meyerowitz
01:00:22
Really enjoyed the stories and the insights into personal experiences and historical events. The translation was so accessible; you could really feel that Mash's thoughts, emotions and style of writing were very direct and important to express. THANK YOU for translating the stories and to the YBC for bringing the book to us.
Sharon
01:00:44
Thank you for the wonderful gift of this book. She is so economical and powerful in her descriptions of moments. I imagine her being that kind of wonderful storyteller in person, when talking to others, in contrast to sometimes overly-verbose story-tellers. Was she unusual in Yiddish literature for her gift for writing examples of such brilliant short, short stories? The shorter stories remind of the current trend toward variation of flash and micro-fiction.
Cathy Taylor
01:02:34
This was fabulous. Listening to you has been so inspiring.
Alegría Baltodano Zomer
01:05:30
Through it all I felt Mash was an optimist. She told the hardships and horrors… but still the sunlight came through. I loved this collection.
Rosaline Horowitz
01:06:03
I also want to thank you for preparing the reading guide and discussion questions associated with Mash's book. The links to the videos of Mash are wonderful. Can you comment on the last question in your discussion question - did they offer you consolation during this recent global crisis and if so, how?
Amy Waldman
01:08:35
Thank you so much for this - I have to leave for a desk shift (I’m a librarian) but have greatly enjoyed your wonderful talk and everyone’s comments.
anitawhite
01:08:42
I appreciated the humanity in the stories and thank you for the sensitive translations
Jeff Hayes
01:09:35
https://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/great-jewish-book-club/landing-stories-yenta-mash-reading-resources
DEBRA GLAZER
01:11:19
Natan Sharansky, who spent years in the gulag, is also a source of optimism and inspiration. He gave many webinars about habits to survive during the pandemic.
Alegría Baltodano Zomer
01:11:30
Thank you!
Jesse Abraham
01:11:44
Thanks so much Ellen your talk and work
Avi
01:11:53
Thank you
DEBRA GLAZER
01:12:01
Thank you very much to Ellen and the YBC.
Sharon
01:12:02
Thanks!!
Susan Denniston
01:12:15
Thank you for your translations and enthusiasm!
lillypelzman
01:12:20
Thank you - the was great!
Jeff Hayes
01:12:27
https://www.grandcentralpublishing.com/titles/sandra-bark/beautiful-as-the-moon-radiant-as-the-stars/9780446510363/