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AERO Conference - June 2022 - Shared screen with speaker view
Samantha Kifer
06:13:26
WOW
Monica Kmetz Cochran
06:13:45
Amazing!
Sylvie
06:14:14
My middle son was telling me about this research a few days ago! Fascinating.
Mila K
06:16:28
I would imagine it might also be related to the theory of mind?
Willow Oceanseed
06:17:38
A couple years ago I reread Helen Keller's The Story of My Life and I was so inspired as she was the most fascinating and inspiring philosopher on the subject of imagination that I had ever read. I didn't read it from that perspective the first time but the second time around, thinking of her as a philosopher in that way, I was blown away...
Al M
06:20:43
Kate is speaking very fast about complex ideas. Common problem. I’m trying to learn to ‘speak slowly and form my words.’ and not feel in a rush to get it out.
Al M
06:24:51
Very interesting Willow!!
Kelley Birch
06:30:51
Can you please restate the difference between subjects and disciplines?
Samantha Kifer
06:31:32
Oh yes, I'd be interested in expanding on that as well: the difference between subjects and disciplines
Al M
06:35:28
Thank you Kate—for trying to slow a bit
Dominique Paloma Bible
06:35:58
yes! agreed about systems!
Samantha Kifer
06:40:40
Part of the problem though, is the passing down of oppressive cultural systems which the education system does currently
Clara Atal
06:42:30
As a COVID homeschooler, just finished 2 “school” years, having stepped out of the system, I have been “schooled” on how limiting the industrialized school system is. The suppression of imaginary play and exploring, the lack of flexibility, the inefficiencies of learning (start/stop, bound by “curriculum”, speed of learning same for all)… it is very hard to contemplate having my children return to that “world”.
Liza Loop
06:43:00
@kate, Many of your comments are directed toward learning for young people who attend school. What advice do have for those of us who work with populations (e.g. refugees and the extremely poor) that have no access to schools?
Samantha Kifer
06:47:42
Kate could you put that info in the chat? I'd be interested as well
Kelley Birch
06:51:51
I am working with a start-up online company whose focus is to provide support to homeschool students and families. Do you have any suggestions for a start-up as to where a good focus would be to get up and running?
Learning Without Borders
06:52:43
so right Stephanie. Kids need to feel safe to really learn and have intrinsic motivation!
Terri Novacek
06:55:05
Is there a way we can get a “coalition” started with the folks here today? I host the Element is Everything podcast and would love to tap into the genius and experiences of you all to help others see how you do the great things you do.
Jane Talkington
06:56:24
This Tahoe project sounds like The Florida Project by Walt Disney 1966.
Stephanie Shuler
06:56:49
Yaacov Hecht
aero 9
06:57:18
https://www.education-cities.com/an-education-city-article-by-yaacov-hecht/
Robert Swanson
06:59:11
Or http://WorldWisePeople.com for collective intelligence
aero 9
06:59:36
Yaacov’s email - Yaacov@education-cities.com
Jerry Mintz
07:00:19
Yaacov Hecht (Yaacov@education-cities.com
Mary Alber EIC
07:01:16
Thank you so much, Kate, for your vision and insights for education revolution with your Father.
Mary Alber EIC
07:04:09
If you or anyone here has further ideas and examples to support our creation of Thrive Ecosystems for the metaverse of youth and communities to learn, work, create, and play together, please contact me! www.eic-nv.org mary.alber@eic-nv.org
Dominique Paloma Bible
07:04:26
who was the neurosci you mentioned? was that book about imagination? where else I can find out about the benefits of imagination? I knew about the importance of play but now i want to know more about imagination, and surely they work together
Kate Robinson
07:04:35
Dr Amir Amedi
Claudia Lamoreaux
07:07:01
https://ed.ted.com/imagine-if
Sylvie
07:07:53
The Magic Years by Selma Fraiberg is also a great read 🙂
Mary Alber EIC
07:08:57
Kate and others - are you familiar with another great resource with similar title by Rob Hopkins to help communities become more creativity together: "From What is to What if: Unleashing the Power of Imagination to Create the Future We Want"
Sylvie
07:11:29
So relatable, Al!
Dominique Paloma Bible
07:11:36
kate - sorry tech issues occurred so I didn't catch some of what you said - but took notes on the parts I caught. I will checking out your work thank you so much - Dom
Hope Speaker
07:12:59
Rather than taking what amounts to an inordinate amount of care with your words, children should be empowered to say "no"
Willow Oceanseed
07:13:16
YES Jerry.
Dominique Paloma Bible
07:13:16
^ very true
Hope Speaker
07:13:39
But that is a regular phrase in our language
Sylvie
07:14:01
I think for many people, that would be an issue to say “I think you would like this book"
Hope Speaker
07:14:16
Language policing can lead to making your relationship inherently false, because children aren't stupid. They know you aren't saying what you really mean,
Stephanie Sewell
07:14:48
I think you MIGHT like this. The "might" is important, I believe:)
Hope Speaker
07:15:17
"You should check this out" isn't inherently bad.
Bruno (he/his)
07:15:27
that gives the possibility for the young person to say "thanks but no". the presence of consent is a key in my opinion
Willow Oceanseed
07:15:29
When you're really over-careful about language avoiding that kind of language that can feel tense and unnatural whereas if a trusting relationship is present 'you should read this book' could be light and have a certain humour in it, and if such a relationship is present the child won't feel pressure in it, IMO, but might feel something around awkward avoidance of normal language...
Sylvie
07:15:58
@Hope, it really is about honoring the young person's autonomy, in how we talk to them, not so much language policing. If I said “you should check this out" to a PDAer, they would very likely NOT want to check it out as a result and miss out on exploring it
Hope Speaker
07:16:02
I think it is a silly distinction to say that "might" makes a huge difference. We shouldn't overthink our interactions.
Hope Speaker
07:18:31
When you need a high level of language control to interact with kids/students/whomever, it really is just a testament to a lack of relationship and unclear social expectations.
Dominique Paloma Bible
07:19:10
thank you Kate for your talk today!
Stephanie Sewell
07:20:21
Kate - at noon Eastern tomorrow, we are having a pop-up session about Teens who Leave School due to it being toxic for them. We'll be touching on this topic for sure. You're most welcome to join us.
Willow Oceanseed
07:21:11
and it also really depends on the school culture I think. in some places 'you should read this book' will feel coercive and make a kid not want to read it (Sudbury Valley probably). In other places the kid knows through healthy connection with the suggester that 'should' is just a suggestion and might just mean the person suggesting it is really excited about it, as in 'oooh you HAVE to read this book!'. There is an emphasis in that statement but it's not an emphasis of coercion but the speaker's excitement of the book.
Al M
07:21:29
Yes Hope, When an authoritarian academic wants to learn to interact respectfully with children there is a lot of control that must be learned.
Terri Novacek
07:21:52
Kate, thank you for keeping the work of your father alive and moving forward. Our non-profit , Element Education, is trying to do the same. Wonderful to have this time with you.
Claudia Lamoreaux
07:22:11
Thank you, Kate and AERO. Much appreciated. Got the book.
Stephanie Sewell
07:22:19
Thank you, Kate!
Learning Without Borders
07:22:27
thank you very much Kate!!
Dileepa Manawadu
07:22:33
Thank you Kate and Aero.
Phill Fulton
07:22:35
Thank you. Brilliant