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Revisiting Online Teaching - Shared screen with speaker view
Anna Hartman
22:48
Welcome, everyone!
Fern Katz
22:57
Fern Katz from Sinai Preschool in Chicago! Director
Alyse Eisenberg
23:05
Alyse Eisenberg-Dallas
Ellen Dietrick
23:14
Ellen Dietrick from Boston!
Jamie Schneider Schwartz
23:16
Jamie Schneider Schwartz, Director of Early Childhood Education at Westchester Day School
Beth Helmey
23:28
Beth Helmey-Ahava ELC in Atlanta GA
Lori-An Penchansky
23:31
Lori-An Penchansky Director ECE from Temple Sholom Preschool, Philadelphia PA
Janet Sear
23:51
Janet Sear Chicago Board of Jewish Education
Rebecca Gautieri
24:00
Rebecca Gautieri from Berman Hebrew Academy, Rockville, MD
Abby Aloni
24:46
Abby Aloni from Bernard Zell in Chicago
rachel ahitow
27:34
Rachel Ahitow from Bernard Zell in Chica
Ellen Dietrick
30:50
-Strengthening communications is key
Ellen Dietrick
31:07
-Using technology to add value
Ellen Dietrick
31:47
-Media can catalyze meaningful learning for children
Ellen Dietrick
33:06
-Serve and return interactions, human relationships are the most important thing, you need an adult to be crazy about child, technology doesn’t substitute
Ellen Dietrick
33:24
Tech can be disruptive to human relationships
Ellen Dietrick
33:59
-What we need now is to take the emerging technologies and use them as relationship drivers
Ellen Dietrick
34:02
-All tech is not created equal
Ellen Dietrick
34:16
-Take tech to use it as catapults to use outside of screen
Ellen Dietrick
34:41
-Joint engagement- take 20 minutes of a tv show and use it for learning beyond the screen
Ellen Dietrick
35:01
-Intergenerational viewing
Ellen Dietrick
35:08
-Follow up prompts after the experience
Ellen Dietrick
35:30
-Build interest driven program of learning
Ellen Dietrick
36:08
-Mistake to stick to delivering content that doesn’t stretch relationships in household, imagination…this is the next step for tech
Ellen Dietrick
36:48
-tech needs to be reinvented as a relationship driver, family asset, not something you sit passively in front of
Ellen Dietrick
37:43
-Digital Wild West right now. We need to teach kids what it means to have a balanced digital diet
Ellen Dietrick
38:01
-Ex. Cookie Monster learning delayed gratification skills
Ellen Dietrick
38:22
-Idea of media mentors can guide and prod a new kind of more healthy and balanced social media diet
Ellen Dietrick
40:00
-Not all media is equal. Technologies can be used for good and bad. Think about it in terms of Cs- Content quality matters, Context in which it is being used
Ellen Dietrick
40:15
-Video chat with grandparents vs parked in front of mindless app
Ellen Dietrick
40:33
-Understand temperament of child- Can they stop and resist the digital media?
Ellen Dietrick
41:08
-Culture and community- understand where you are introducing the media- use music, games, podcasts- tech as a driver of creativity and innovation
Anna Hartman
41:34
—Wide Open School
Rebecca Gautieri
41:41
Thank you for being here Michael Levine!
Ellen Dietrick
41:41
-Wide Open School- Project of Common Sense Media, started in March, Pre-k-12 offering for parents and educators
Ellen Dietrick
42:08
https://wideopenschool.org/
Ellen Dietrick
42:32
Noggin.com New offering free to all schools
Anna Hartman
43:16
—Welcoming Dr. Rona Novick!
Anna Hartman
43:44
—We had to pivot so quickly with no warning.
Anna Hartman
44:00
—We should pat ourselves on the back for the work we educators have all done.
Anna Hartman
44:37
—There will always be snow days and opportunities for us to think about how to harness and leverage technology.
Anna Hartman
45:02
—“Online learning” rather than learning that is distance or not real (virtual)
Anna Hartman
45:28
—Three cheers for a field that researches together! Team work makes the dream work!
Anna Hartman
46:06
—As you make decisions about online learning, what have we learned can guide us.
Anna Hartman
46:32
—Challenge of the spring: rapidly changing situation meeting needs of multiple constituencies
Anna Hartman
46:50
—Dealing with a ticking clock today. Need to make decisions now.
Anna Hartman
47:42
—Survey looks at 306 responses, mostly mothers responded. Mostly dual-parent families. Most had siblings living at home. Vast majority were working parents.
Anna Hartman
48:11
—Most were working from home while their children were engaging with teachers’ material.
Anna Hartman
48:38
—Children attended online programming daily, willing to join online programming! Not as typical in older children.
Anna Hartman
49:41
—Only parents whose children were registered in preschool during 4th closure completed the survey.
Anna Hartman
50:07
—Discrepancy between length/amount of offerings and actual utilization.
Anna Hartman
50:16
—Children engaging on average for less than an hour.
Anna Hartman
50:26
—Parents extraordinarily positive about everything that you did!
Anna Hartman
50:36
—Vast majority: somewhat, very, or extremely helpful.
Anna Hartman
50:57
—Surprising given the complaints we have heard privately.
Anna Hartman
51:12
—75% Very much appreciated the offerings.
Anna Hartman
51:33
—What would parents have liked offered for children and parents? Open-ended questions. Five themes:
Anna Hartman
53:18
—1) More is not better. Brief sessions. Small group sessions with child’s regular teacher. Social over academic. In times of shutdown, might schools consider serving as friendship/playdate facilitator? Sending materials home would help. Need recognition of parent schedules. Awareness of materials that can be accesses.
Anna Hartman
54:30
—2) The personal matters! Want child’s connection with their particular teacher. Maintaining personal connection. Low tech can work (eg greeting cards, sending a drawing you made in the mail).
Anna Hartman
56:42
—3) Partnership is appreciated. Recognizing burdens on parents’ time. Consider putting together modules now that are ready to go. Something you can pull out at any time and have delivered to families. Vehicle for capturing parent hopes and dreams. Parent coop that would leverage the time some parents can give while others work. Helping children learn about how to be at home—how to interact when parents are working. Can we offer downtime for parents in some way? Think about families and friends—how to engage all of these folks on screen to help and participate.
Anna Hartman
58:33
—4) Schools are social places, social conveners. Parents miss this! Eg Drop off time schmoozing. How to build and maintain sense of community. Wanting some parent care: Academically geared workshop and social/emotional/mental health. How can tech promote socialization. Eg virtual playdates, family gatherings. Establish mechanisms to share info about families who might be struggling and need attention.
Anna Hartman
01:00:19
—5) Money mattered. So many parents wanted recognition that what purchased was not what they got. Being clear and transparent about refund policy. Different financial arrangements or models? While all are tightening belts. All programs will need to demonstrate value added and purpose. What are all the things we offer? Parent survey to see what parents would value most? Paying regular tuition most amenable when they feel they have access to 1-1 interaction.
Anna Hartman
01:01:40
—Preview: Parent stress levels were incredibly high, but despite that the parent-child relationship remain string; parents identity as parents endured.
Anna Hartman
01:02:14
—We will post this link from Rona in the notes that will be published after this session, at jparadigm.org
Anna Hartman
01:02:55
—Affix your masks first; please take care of yourselves. You are so important!
Anna Hartman
01:05:39
—Carla Goldberg at Akiba Schechter Jewish Day School in Chicago talks about caddies for loose parts, yoga, recycling, and art that the school made for summer families.
Anna Hartman
01:06:10
—Children built while we were together online. Did this in breakout groups of ten, with two teachers in each.
Janet Sear
01:06:10
Carla, This is so amazing!!!!!
Anna Hartman
01:07:04
—Built habitats for animals in the Lincoln Park Zoo. Made and studied bridges. Amazed by the children’s excitement and willingness to engage.
Anna Hartman
01:07:15
—Welcoming Jesse Tobin from Needham, MA!
Anna Hartman
01:07:52
—Daily Zooms, pre-recorded, weekly virtual playdates in small groups, doing 1-1.
Anna Hartman
01:08:18
—Magic started to happen when teachers started thinking outside the screen and began combining online learning with an in-person component.
Anna Hartman
01:08:47
—Eg one teacher missed challah baking. She delivered dough to each family and they made it together online.
Anna Hartman
01:10:02
—One fours class decided that to carry on the sewing project they do each year, the teachers got all of the materials together. Invited families to join in this small group. Delivered materials to children’s homes. Supported the learning over many weeks. Eventually the items were outside the teacher’s home and the children would come and pick them up. Made an in-person connection safely.
Anna Hartman
01:11:02
—One teacher on a virtual playdate with a student and heard student’s brother having a hard time in the bathroom. After ending the playdate, she drive to family’s house and turned up music to have a dance party together (but socially distanced). Connected with someone else in the family and face the support the family needed.
Anna Hartman
01:11:12
—Driveway visits were a big hit.
Anna Hartman
01:11:58
—Chalk tag was a big hit. Leaving drawings on a driveway. “TBS loves you.” Special moment to see that teacher or friends were thinking of them. Then would pass it on.
Anna Hartman
01:12:41
—Maintaining deep connections and relationships. If and when we return to this online learning, how can we think about it in relation to the human connection? How to really make the relationship that much deeper and meaningful.
Anna Hartman
01:13:18
—Welcome, Josh Rifkin from the Denver JCC!
Anna Hartman
01:13:41
—Reggio Inspired Learning in a Virtual World?
Anna Hartman
01:14:04
—How to take this out of the regular classroom and plant in the virtual classroom.
Anna Hartman
01:14:41
—Will there be space to embrace the emerging interests of children?
Anna Hartman
01:15:02
—This is the truest test of our philosophy.
Anna Hartman
01:15:12
—Can it hold up under stress and strain?
Anna Hartman
01:15:35
—Story that gave me glimmer of hope in the cedar tree classroom.
Anna Hartman
01:16:26
Voice of a child: I unmuted myself. T is grinning at me. Playful power struggle over the mute button. T’s victory with the mute button is unleashed, contagious.
Anna Hartman
01:16:46
—Evidence of real learning. These kids were teaching each other how to use Zoom!
Anna Hartman
01:16:58
—What does it mean to put a child on mute? Loss of voice or agency?
Anna Hartman
01:17:24
—How might Zoom be like clay or another tool for learning? Do we need to scaffold like we would with any other tool?
Anna Hartman
01:17:45
—[Anna: I am laughing out loud. Wow.]
Anna Hartman
01:18:20
—We asked T to teach other children to draw with virtual crayons.
Anna Hartman
01:18:34
—Kids started creating virtual collaborative murals.
Anna Hartman
01:18:47
—Co-constructing knowledge of Zoom together.
Anna Hartman
01:19:36
—Disappointment that families thought this was chaotic. Wish I had said: this is what real learning looks like! Messy. Utilizing all the 21st century skills.
Alyse Eisenberg
01:19:57
Wow, this is awesome!
Anna Hartman
01:20:15
—Future success would depend on us setting the stage. Preparing ourselves and families to embrace discomfort. Would need to remind selves that discomfort and challenge are the engines that propel us forward.
Rebecca Gautieri
01:21:02
That was inspiring!
Anna Hartman
01:21:02
—Mr. Rogers. Connecting, and safe space. Space between cameras and viewers a sacred space.
Lori-An Penchansky
01:21:15
That was great Josh, thanks!
Anna Hartman
01:21:37
—Welcoming Melissa Hume from Stephen Wise ECC in NYC.
Anna Hartman
01:22:30
—Small group learning experiences where we had mentality of “Is there a way for us to reconstruct the feeling and way we learned together in person?”
Anna Hartman
01:23:41
—Ultimately we shared with parents our thinking: Sent a week in advance. Expectations, timing. Wanted to introduce small group work to our repertoire. Will wait and observe children’s responses rather than full-speed ahead with a program.
Anna Hartman
01:23:59
—Rotated among teachers.
Anna Hartman
01:24:11
—Started out with small group.
Anna Hartman
01:24:37
—Sometimes even needed more than 30 minutes.
Anna Hartman
01:24:57
—Meaningful play opportunity with common materials.
Anna Hartman
01:25:26
—Didn’t know what families had access to. Tried to be flexible.
Anna Hartman
01:25:41
—Flexible with timing, offered different options.
Anna Hartman
01:26:28
—Found that it started feeling like classroom life. Used spotlight to say “I notice that x child is doing y.”
Anna Hartman
01:27:23
—Children made connections with own structures and dollhouses they had. Started to talk about this. Third child, when we next met, showed us a cardboard dollhouse she had made. Extended beyond what happened in our calls.
Anna Hartman
01:28:27
—This gives me hope! Thanks, Melissa!
Anna Hartman
01:28:59
—Welcoming Stephanie Slater from Gan HaYeled at Adas Israel in D.C.
Anna Hartman
01:29:22
—Works in early identification and intervention, toward inclusion.
Anna Hartman
01:29:38
—Children with learning needs are struggling.
Anna Hartman
01:30:17
—More than ever, thinking about front loading. Preparing with materials in advance. Always doing this in inclusion work and especially now.
Anna Hartman
01:30:50
—Preparing visuals comes naturally to us. Maybe not to families. Re:what is next, what to expect.
Anna Hartman
01:31:20
—“Lesson Pix” enables you to make visuals so that parents could create visual routines for the children.
Anna Hartman
01:31:32
—Looked at daily routines in blocks. Morning and afternoon.
Anna Hartman
01:31:52
—Part of the importance of these is some ownership and agency for the day.
Anna Hartman
01:32:25
—After breakfast and morning meeting, showing parents to use two visuals as a choice for the child as to what to do next.
Anna Hartman
01:32:54
—Parents need coaching through the Zooms. We cue the children when in person. Would speak to parents in advance to give a preview so that they would know when to help child in that Zoom meeting.
Anna Hartman
01:33:18
—Parents not prepared to be teachers. Suddenly engaged in power struggles to get children to watch Zoom meetings.
Anna Hartman
01:33:35
—One teacher would send weekly video suggesting how to get the children engaged.
Anna Hartman
01:33:49
—Parent would play each part during the week when activity was offered.
Anna Hartman
01:35:36
—Sending this video to the family every week set the child up for the week without the struggle.
Anna Hartman
01:37:10
—Puppet character allowed me to create a social story to introduce a new concept. Her name is Rosie and Rosie would share how she got a new mask. Our intention was for Rosie to show how to go through a health check/screening.
Anna Hartman
01:38:01
—Made in PPT.
Anna Hartman
01:40:16
—Help parents think about designing a space for Zoom classroom.
Anna Hartman
01:41:05
—Teaching parents about movement, natural movement. Having children get up to go get something during Zoom.
Anna Hartman
01:41:31
—One-to-one virtual playdate.
Anna Hartman
01:42:03
—Remember your students who need extra supports by front-loading!
Anna Hartman
01:42:12
—Thank you, Stephanie!!
Anna Hartman
01:42:45
—Welcoming Alana Gelnick from Riverdale, NY!
Anna Hartman
01:44:02
—Inviting all of us to do better this year, to reflect, to think about making time.
Anna Hartman
01:44:12
—Zoom and Gloom? Or Zoom and Bloom?
Anna Hartman
01:44:43
—Growing children in a COVID world.
Anna Hartman
01:44:55
—When first began, all wanted a circle time.
Anna Hartman
01:45:10
—But what the children wanted to do was come over, have a chat, show things to a friend.
Anna Hartman
01:45:36
—Quickly realized that first needed morning chatting before community building activities. Circle times needed to be shorter than in person.
Anna Hartman
01:45:52
—I might do it in my classroom one way, and might do it differently on Zoom.
Anna Hartman
01:46:59
—Every student has small group or one on one each day.
Anna Hartman
01:47:35
—Relationships grew significantly when we did things that way.
Anna Hartman
01:48:14
—Sitting and chatting on Zoom. Talking and coloring. Unstructured time for chatting, “Just” coloring. The stuff from classroom life where real growth happens.
Anna Hartman
01:48:28
—Sending everyone seeds for planting together, watching our plants grow.
Anna Hartman
01:48:57
—Having children sharing what they are doing.
Anna Hartman
01:49:51
—Daily challenges: Using household materials. Same children doing over and over, eventually having these children lead them.
Anna Hartman
01:50:42
—Back then, we were scrambling, This year we will have supply cases ready to go. Families can pick up should we have to go virtual. Teachers and families will have materials.
Anna Hartman
01:50:51
—WE’VE GOT THIS!!
Alyse Eisenberg
01:51:23
This was outstanding! Thank you!!!
Janet Sear
01:51:35
Thanks so much!
Alison Popky
01:51:37
Awesome! Thank you!
Rebecca Gautieri
01:51:39
Thank you Alana. Thank you Sasha, Anna, JEnna!
Anna Hartman
01:51:41
—Today rabbah to our amazing presenters!
Fern Katz
01:51:46
Thank you! Excellent!
Sandy Gold
01:51:47
thank you- this was great!!
Jamie Schneider Schwartz
01:51:51
THANK YOU!
Jacklin Robeny
01:52:07
Thanks
Sandrine Gold
01:52:25
this was incredible