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Winter SCALE Meeting 2021 - Shared screen with speaker view
Spencer Lachman - Sierra Institute
23:30
SCALE website link:https://scale.sierrainstitute.us/
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
50:42
Here is the agenda for today, if folks would like it for reference
David Zelinsky
55:57
why did the state stop Will’s prescribed Fire?
susan jamerson
56:49
What is AHAL? I'm not familiar.
Will Harling
56:55
CALFIRE permitted our prescribed burns in early November, however our local Forest Service partners were not able to burn due to a region wide burn suspension
Will Harling
57:13
USFS R5 Burn suspension for federal lands.
Will Harling
58:23
All Hands All Lands is an interagency prescribed fire program developed in New Mexico and now being developed in Northern CA.
susan jamerson
59:12
thank you
Will Harling
01:00:19
AHAL creates a regional network of prescribed fire resources that can come together to gather needed resources to implement burns on multiple jurisdictions. The Karuk Tribe, Watershed Center, Mid Klamath Watershed Council, Shasta Valley RCD, and others are currently building the framework for this Nor Cal version of AHAL.
Will Harling
01:00:54
All about hitting the burn windows when they arise on short notice.
Sherry Reckler
01:08:21
Hi Frank--can you share again what percentage of the Mendocino NF burned during the August Fire? Thank you for your presentation-MIND BLOWING!
Frank Aebly
01:09:51
We figured about 97% between the 2018 Ranch and the August complex. at various intensities
Sherry Reckler
01:10:36
Thanks for the reply and your incredibly hard work!
Will Harling
01:17:15
Sad that Kathy McCovey wasn't able to make it on. Eventbrite was not friendly to me this morning. Thanks to Sierra Institute admin for forwarding the actual zoom link. Kathy lost her home in the Slater Fire, along with many other Karuk tribal members in Happy Camp. Thankfully, most of Karuk Tribal Housing was saved by some hard firefighting. Kathy has been promoting cultural fire management for decades, and is a mentor of mine. It is time for us to empower cultural fire practitioners to assume leadership roles on state and federal lands to restore fire process. Cultural fire management worked in CA for 10,000+ years and can work again, even with the growth of the WUI and modern infrastructure. Indeed, it is the only proven fire management strategy.
Frank Aebly
01:27:06
Irvin, thank you for sharing all that. We are working with some of the Pomo right now on developing a tribal crew thanks to things we have learned through the SCALE workshops and what you and your tribes have been doing.
Rafael Aguilera
01:27:39
Thank you Irvin for sharing.
Helen Fillmore
01:35:40
Wondering if you can expand on the TEK certification - would this be a tool used in the contracting process to ensure work crews have the experience/knowledge needed for protecting and enhancing local keystone species in forestry work, or something else?
Frank Aebly
01:37:29
Yes I would be interested in that certification process as well to share with our tribal partners we are working with to see if they want to do that for their crew
Rafael Aguilera
01:37:51
Very interested in TEK certification questions as well.
Jonathan Long
01:48:29
@Will Harling--it would be great if you might share how you see the PODs framework helping to address the kinds of negative impacts from wildfires (and wildfire management) that Kathy has described to us so vividly.
Helen Fillmore
01:50:16
Thank you so much
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
02:01:35
Link to survey
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
02:01:52
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf-77WrAz5n_WsDWUDT97R7_ORyttSUiSsRrUKmEz28Mmvedw/viewform?usp=sf_link
Will Harling
02:01:58
How can we support the FS getting their offense on the field? So much of their staffing and resources are devoted to fire suppression and fire salvage. How do we get ahead of the fire next time?
Rowena Yeahquo
02:05:48
Rowena Yeahquo, R5 Tribal Relations Specialist rowena.yeahquo@usda.gov
john amodio
02:09:17
Given the current FS staff limitations, can you address the specific opportunities that the agreement with California now affords counties, tribes and collaboratives to more directly take on forest health work.
John Buckley
02:13:51
The high success rate of initial attack that only allows for 2 percent to burn is exactly what has caused such an excessive build-up of fuel, overly dense forest stands, and ladder fuels that lead to crown fires. Can the Forest Service be part of the adjustment to let many low intensity wildfires become “managed” wildfires and let acres get treated rather than being unburned?
Sherry Reckler
02:14:06
Sherry Reckler
Jonathan Long
02:14:29
There is great potential to integrate tribal values into the scenario planning process that Randy was describing, as well as the PODs process that Will discussed--including restoration/protection of old growth oaks and sugar pines, restoration of meadows, management of ridgelines with culturally appropriate treatments. promotion of other cultural keystones and integration of opportunities for more cultural burning. We are working on these issues in various research projects. Thank you for the presentations that helped bring these opportunities into the sunlight!
Sherry Reckler
02:14:53
Sherry RecklerConservation Financesherry.reckler@usda.gov
Will Harling
02:15:02
The 98% success rate at suppressing fires creates the conditions for the 2% of unstoppable fires to burn everything. We need patchy frequent fire. How do we set the stage for managed wildfire, for sustained investment in prescribed fire, for directives that reduce the impediments to prescribed fire? How do we move away from the failed experiment of fire suppression as the dominant fire management strategy in CA?
Crystal Danheiser
02:18:13
Has there been any discussions with the state or air quality to open up or increase our burn windows? Instead of being shut down from " political burn suspensions", decreasing the agency's effective burn windows
Will Harling
02:23:14
Thanks for making time Randy. Communities in the Western Klamath Mtns are ready for managed wildfires, and for cultural fire.
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
02:23:42
Apologies, all. The link was sent prematurely earlier. Here it is again for those who need it https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf-77WrAz5n_WsDWUDT97R7_ORyttSUiSsRrUKmEz28Mmvedw/viewform?usp=sf_link
Lisa Worthington
02:27:29
Hi Corrine - Not sure if this is a common issue? Clicking the link leads to a message screen - "You need permission. This form can only be viewed by users in the owner's organization."
Charles Tyler
02:27:34
Hi all
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
02:29:23
Hi Lisa- thank you very much for letting me know. Permissions should now be changed!
Lisa Worthington
02:31:12
You bet :)
Charles Tyler
02:38:00
I am working with Camptonville which is in Yuba county. we are constructing a 5mw bio mass plant to burn forest trees that need to be cleared. this will help manage forest clutter and add to the health of are forest.We will be focusing on the Plumas area.the hard part is getting the feed stock contracts at a reasonable price.
Ali Meders-Knight
02:45:48
Four tribes in ISWI filed a consultation request with Cal OES for Camp Fire restoration. We are still waiting for a response 13 months later.
Frank Aebly
02:52:14
can the TEK certification be general enough that we can maybe certify some of our divisions that direct things on the ground during wildfire response. we can then order a certified division for areas that are sensitive. the obstacle I see is that when we order a division or other overhead they may come from out of the area
William Tripp
02:58:51
https://www.karuk.us/images/docs/dnr/SBIFMP_CRSR.pdf
William Tripp
02:58:59
https://karuktribeclimatechangeprojects.com/climate-adaptation-plan/
Lisa Worthington
02:59:26
Respectful outreach message and slight correction to response by Irvin Jim. CalOES (not Caltrans) controlled the FEMA funding and related contracting rules regarding Camp Fire Recovery. Ali Menders-Knight described this in her comment above. Caltrans welcomes an opportunity to learn how TEK and CHIPS can enhance our vegetation management program.
William Tripp
03:00:03
Here are two resources as well that get to what Ali was saying in regard to Karuk Country, climate action and TEK based project planning as a precursor to programmatic action in perpetuity.
susan jamerson
03:01:31
Excellent Bill, thanks.
Lauren Redmore, Sierra Institute
03:01:33
These are awesome websites! Thanks for sharing Bill and Ali!
Lauren Redmore, Sierra Institute
03:02:03
https://tekchico.org/ For those who missed Ali’s link
David Zelinsky
03:03:02
Does Steve Wilensky have a website for his program?
Spencer Lachman - Sierra Institute
03:05:03
CHIPS Website http://www.calaveraschips.org/
Will Harling
03:07:19
Thanks Steve for the truth telling around inequities. Here on the Six Rivers NF, we have federally qualified tribal burn bosses that aren't allowed to implement prescribed burns on public lands by Six Rivers NF fire leadership, due to "lack of trust" in the tribe to make sure these prescribed burns don't escape. Meanwhile, FS fire suppression and forced cessation of indigenous burning in the Indian Creek watershed set the stage for tribal members to lose their homes, regalia, and in one case, their life. The FS gets to choose the risk they accept, while both tribal and non-tribal residents live with the risk imposed by a century of fire suppression practices every summer. It is time for the federal and state governments to decriminalize cultural fire, and embrace frequent fire on the landscape with the same gusto they implement fire suppression.
William Tripp
03:07:19
https://www.karuk.us/images/docs/dnr/Socio%20Economic%20vs%20Socio%20Ecologic_Rossier_Tripp_2019.pdf
William Tripp
03:07:30
https://www.karuk.us/images/docs/dnr/Socio%20Ecological%20Resilience%20Indicator_Rossier_Tripp_2019.pdf
William Tripp
03:08:38
1/3 of the cost of one fire in Karuk Territory could have established an endowment fund that generated $2.25 million per year for indigenous stewardship
Crystal Danheiser
03:12:18
Well said gentlemen
Frank Aebly
03:17:56
I have never liked consultation because it’s legally required and some agencies people will just check the boxes required and not getting that true relationship. thoughts from the panel?
Frank Aebly
03:18:30
to clarify I wouldn’t want to get rid of the legal requirement
Jason Ko
03:27:18
tfpa and good neighbor can be tools to help change that ex-post consultation dynamic by making it more tribal community led project from design through implementation.
susan jamerson
03:30:09
That was really a great discussion - very energizing!
Craig Christensen
03:30:14
Great Stuff Ladies and Gentlemen! Exciting!
Rafael Aguilera
03:30:47
Love the energy of the group here. Thanks for inviting me Jonathan. Cant wait to get our project started supporting TEK, workforce development and the High Road to Forest Stewardship. Rafael, CWDB
Alex Vance
03:31:50
Thank you so much for this insightful discussion, all--I really appreciate your sharing your experiences and ideas.
Jonathan Kusel
03:32:33
For all of you unable to stay to the end please fill out a BRIEF survey on the workshop. Corrinne will post the link again.
Will Harling
03:33:52
FIRE EXCLUSION and resultant FUEL ACCUMULATION, along with climate change, are behind uptick in recent megafires. Good research coming out on this.
Jonathan Kusel
03:34:14
Here’s the link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf-77WrAz5n_WsDWUDT97R7_ORyttSUiSsRrUKmEz28Mmvedw/viewform?usp=sf_link
Lauren Redmore, Sierra Institute
03:34:19
Post-SCALE survey: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf-77WrAz5n_WsDWUDT97R7_ORyttSUiSsRrUKmEz28Mmvedw/viewform?usp=sf_link
David Zelinsky
03:34:51
Have a hard exit at 4:00. Regrets.
Will Harling
03:35:13
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/abd78e
John Buckley
03:37:33
As an environmental leader, I press strongly for the State working to increase the economic viability of biomass removal of excess forest fuels… a pivotal current gap in many regions of the state and even in the Sierra Nevada. Is that objective embraced by the Action Plan?
randy Hanvelt
03:38:30
John Buckley is right on!
Will Harling
03:40:57
We can get to scale quickly by empowering non-state, non-federal partners to develop local capacity. CALFIRE is doing this through their Forest Health program by investing in leadership positions in local and tribal organizations, in addition to project outputs. These tribal and NGO leaders provided surge capacity to fight local wildfires, acting as Division and Task Force leaders on the Slater Fire, when we were at Planning Level 5 in CA.
susan jamerson
03:41:46
I agree with the need for biomass processing - a big hole in the system.
William Tripp
03:42:48
Will, we would need to recognize tribal management authority to get there, we are still a long ways from getting fire on the ground off of private property.
Rowena Yeahquo
03:43:35
Is this CA Action Plan funded?
Frank Aebly
03:45:00
is that funding low interest or no interact loans available to tribes?
Ali Meders-Knight
03:45:04
There are 33 million acres of forest in CA and the plan is only for 1 million acres a year. With over 100 federally recognized and 53 state-recognized tribes in CA, how will the resources be distributed. Tribes can help to even exceed that goal if they are able to build that capacity.
john amodio
03:45:19
What are current thoughts on how to move from current shotgun, project by project funding to a continuous funding commitment needed to increase pace and scale through a comprehensive plan that will require many years to implement.?
Norma Santiago
03:48:22
What is the state willing to do to incentivize private investment in expanding the economic development of forest byproducts?
Corrinne Scieszka- Sierra Institute
03:54:19
Link to survey: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf-77WrAz5n_WsDWUDT97R7_ORyttSUiSsRrUKmEz28Mmvedw/viewform?usp=sf_link
Sandy Anderson, CSEDD
03:54:46
Thank you for a wonderful format & everyone who shared with us!
Alex Vance
03:55:31
Thank you so much including me in this meeting-such valuable and invigorating conversation.
john amodio
03:55:40
Great program today and kudos to Sierra Ijstitute
Will Harling
03:55:48
Thanks all!
Rhiana Jones
03:55:49
thank you, very informative and inspiring!
Rafael Aguilera
03:55:50
Safe travels everyone!