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The Science of Forest Carbon Management - Shared screen with speaker view
Larry E Totten
01:52
Larry Totten
Michael Gieryk
02:03
Hampshire County, MA
Timothy Russell
02:10
Chenango County, NY. Hi everyone.
Ben Vicere
02:17
Ben Vicere
Charles Levesque
02:30
Please don't introduce yourself. We have over 500 registered for this webinar
Larry E Totten
02:34
West Bath, ME
Charles Levesque
02:46
www.northeastforestcarbon.org
john zylstra
02:54
John Zylstra Port Jervis NY
Charles Levesque
03:00
levesque@inrsllc.com for Charlie Levesque
Andy Powell
03:28
Good morning. Andy in Danbury, Merrimack County, NH
RICK PERCOCO
03:56
Good morning from East Greenbush, Rensselaer County, NY
Emmy Michelfelder
04:06
Morning! Emmy in Boston, MA
Steve Hagenbuch
04:26
Good morning. Steve in Waterbury Center, VT
Charles Levesque
04:31
Please DON'T introduce yourself. We have over 500 registered for this webinar
Elizabeth Cushman
05:51
Good Morning from Durham, ME
Robert Kobelia, CF
05:59
Robert Kobelia, Bennington, VT
HARRIS ROEN
06:28
Good morning from Burlington
Jonathan Crast
12:21
good morning from Burrville NY
Carl DuPoldt
20:20
Will attendees get a Certificate of Attendance at the Conclusion of this webinar?
Carl DuPoldt
21:57
Thank you
Andrew Rianhard
24:51
I think Airbnb & VRBO are a main culprit of current forest loss, due to development. What % of land purchases from out of state buyers in VT will end up being an Airbnb? Vacation housing should be dense & efficient
ML
27:01
Invasive Plants + Climate Change = big trouble for NE forests, imo. On the edges of my woodlot, I see things like multi-flora rose, knotweed, and particularly the non-native bittersweet getting a jump on native plants early in the season, literally strangling / holding back tree growth. Look forward to more on this topic ...
Mary Wigmore
28:25
How long was the longitudinal PEF study period?
Mary Wigmore
30:31
Do you mean cutting cycle time between harvest entries vs rotation is time to grow your intended product?
Robert Seymour
30:41
PEF was about 50-55 years.
Robert Seymour
41:49
Gap size becomes largely irrelevant with appropriate modest retention (10-30%) within the gap. Early successional habitat is not the same thing as young forest of late-successional species.
Elisabeth McLane
44:11
Large trees: not to mention they may have more developed/extensive mychorrhizal networks
Todd Ontl
45:18
Bob: That 10-30 % retention in large gaps, is that based on BA?
Robert Seymour
46:06
Yes, BA works better than other metrics because its proportional to crown area (shading).
Todd Ontl
46:47
Thanks
Robert Kobelia, CF
47:06
Do you have a recommended BA of "acceptable cull" that will compliment long term timber management?
Alex Metzger
49:16
There is an huge educational opportunity with landowners around deadwood and down woody biomass left after harvest, I talk to many landowners who want to "clean up" the forest
John McNerney
52:44
Alex - I agree about the educational opportunity. There are organizations already working on that education: Vermont Coverts: Wiidlands for Wildlife, Audubon Vermont, Vermont Family Forests, The Chittenden County Forester (Ethan Tapper) has done a great job of communicating this on his many forest walks and talks
RICK PERCOCO
53:27
Does the decomposition of deadwood into methane outweigh the benefit of leaving it , since methane is 20x more insular for the atmosphere? I expect there is a cross-over in time for benefit.
Steve Hagenbuch
53:38
@alex Metzger, yes indeed. Much of what Ali is presenting matches with bird-friendly forestry. Birds are an accessible entry point and way for many landowners hesitant to manage their forest to become engaged.
Alex Metzger
54:36
My understanding is that methane is more common in anaerobic decomp, so most deadwood offgassing would be CO2... but I'm not an expert!
Molly Docherty
59:47
Can you comment on the importance of Leaf Area Index in eastern forests and how certain strategies maximizing leaf area index could be used to better offset very high soil respiration in young forests? (following Law et al. 2001 study in Oregon)
Stephen Wood
01:00:04
Can we get the recording of this presentation? lspencer@farnumhillciders.com (Louisa Spencer) My son the brand-new forester would benefit.
Kevin Lemire
01:01:09
When assessing/inventorying a property for enrollment in a carbon program, are there any considerations or values assessed for existing soil and BMP conditions seeing as it is 50% + of the carbon structure in a forest? Seems like the main focus is on tree species, densities, structure and health.
Stephen Wood
01:02:11
Sorry I was late
roger dziengeleski
01:02:22
storm events also remove substantial amounts of soil and litter carbon from forest stores? i.e. snow melt or heavy rains.
Todd Ontl
01:02:47
Typically carbon programs do not include soil carbon stocks in the estimation of additionality compared to the baseline, essentially it assumes no change.
Si Balch
01:06:27
at best 60% of a tree can be put into traditional solid wood products, the opportunity is in products made from chips or other wood that has been processed and reconfigured into panels.
james stromecki
01:07:32
what is the effect of using wood scraps for heat and power generation since this is 'carbon neutral' over the long term ???
RICK PERCOCO
01:08:27
There is a good article in the May 2nd New Yorker on all-timber construction in Norway and elsewhere (but not in the US).
john zylstra
01:11:45
We already spend too much time writing plans,
john zylstra
01:12:36
sorry, any ready to use computer proframs available?
roger dziengeleski
01:12:44
is there a soil color guide for estimating soil carbon?
Paul Renaud
01:12:58
Which website to find iTree tools?
Charles Levesque
01:13:39
Website for everything www.northeastforestcarbon.org
Kevin Lemire
01:14:46
What effects, if any, do sugaring operations have on forest carbon? I would assume it is positive from a storage standpoint but is it negative regarding sequestration due to tapping stress?
ML
01:15:34
If native birds take advantage of better silvicultural management (thinning / disturbance) to end up introducing an invasive plant to a new site ... is that a positive or a negative carbon-wise? Simplified concept, and obviously depends on specific site dynamics & time frames, but nevertheless ...
Timothy Russell
01:16:47
I would not consider the harvest deferral necessary to "extend harvest cycles" or implement "passive management" to cost $0.
Elisabeth McLane
01:19:35
Our imported wood: where is it coming from, mostly?
Kenneth Laustsen
01:20:43
Most typically, Canada
Lynne Fitzhugh
01:21:24
Excellent presentation. Thank you.
Mary Wigmore
01:24:04
My interpretation of the use of mats, portable bridges, and heavy upper material matting helps us to protect the soils pool in the roads, correct? Are we still reducing that pool with the possible rutting/compaction beneath the wood and the compaction? Is the largest priority to simply minimize main hauling roads and use of secondary roads only for one wagon load through the extensive road network?
David Irvin
01:25:47
Our clearcuts in Connecticut are more typically in hardwoods, which could impact the percentage in landfills.
Mary Wigmore
01:26:05
Can you give any references or contact for folks that are exploring reducing our industry wide c footprint and using alternatives for our fuel/lubricant needs industry wide? This strategy will support our sustainability and public image. Thanks.
David Irvin
01:28:05
Thank you for a fascinating, comprehensive and helpful presentation once again!!
Tim Stout
01:28:44
I second that. Extremely helpful and insightful.
WILLIAM STRAUSS
01:34:06
If the daily growth rate is equal to or greater than the daily harvest rate across a forest landscape, does that not result in no loss of carbon stock at all?
Amanda Bunce
01:34:56
Regeneration of the forest that the wood comes from is a critical factor in the consideration of wood as a “carbon neutral” source of energy.
Eduardo Paixao
01:35:53
Tipically when talking about bioenergy for the EU, we are talking about residues from primary production.
Sara Hart
01:35:54
Please share the link to this soil carbon mapping effort
ML
01:36:28
Thank you! Very interesting presentations.
Michelle Matteo
01:36:42
Thank you!
Keri Yankus
01:36:49
Thank you!
HARRIS ROEN
01:36:50
Thanks for a great presentation
Eduardo Paixao
01:37:18
Thank you, Ali, excellent presentation.
Kathleen Brooks
01:37:21
Thank you.
Robert Collins
01:37:29
Thank you Ali!
amanda freitas
01:37:54
Thanks so much!