Zoom Logo

FEEDBACK FRIDAY: Ethnographic Fiber + Dyes From Black & Indigenous Farmers WITH LaChaun Moore - Shared screen with speaker view
Karen Baker
53:48
Amazing conversation!
Elaine KOSA Arts
54:28
In gratitude if your works and sharing your family stories
Lesley Ham
54:28
Were there images?
Amy DuFault
54:29
Ask LaChaun questions here!
Anita Fleming
54:35
Thank you for sharing your stories
Rachel Kahn
54:46
The conversation was wonderful to hear, but I did not see any images….
Sue Malvern
54:46
Can we see the images? Screen sharing not working. Wonderful stories
Heather Powers
54:48
Thank you LaChaun, the oral histories add a rich dimension to your work and I'm sure to your exhibition. Congratulations on that show!
Hilary Baker
54:52
Bravo! This is amazing work
Amy DuFault
54:56
I think so Lesley but we couldn’t see :(
Kathy Tamai
54:56
Lovely narrative, but I didn’t see any images.
Lesley Ham
54:59
Amazing project, deserves a MacArthur award!
Amy DuFault
55:04
Nice to just listen though :)
Susan Terrill
55:10
when I lived in Memphis, Cotton, was
Suzanne Watzman
55:13
My apologies, missed LaChaun’s comment about fast fashion- in the beginning of her talk…
Heather Powers
55:20
Do you have images of your exhibition at the Hilliard?
Mary Lance
55:25
Thank you for these rich stories
Teresa Heady
55:41
So important to capture this history
Cecile Lewis
55:54
I still think about my ancestors every time I begin working on another piece. I made a ceramic piece of my Great-great grandmother hauling that cotton sack. The strap is broken.
kimm branch
55:55
thank you for sharing, beautiful
Susan Terrill
55:58
cotton was King in Memphis. this is an amazing s
Teresa Heady
56:02
Thank you
Kristin Freeman
56:04
Thank you LaChaun for a wonderful visit with the history of your family and other black farmers, This was amazing and so appreciated.
Jeanne Hupprich
56:07
Beautiful story thank you so much.
Rachel Kahn
56:07
Could we see the Images of the work please?
Heather Giroux
56:09
Did you use organic farming methods or did you stick with more traditional farming?
Patricia Walters
56:12
Where can we get a copy of her research?
lisa stankus
56:21
such important stories! very grateful for your work
Deb Reierson
56:23
Thank you for sharing this history! Personal histories are so wonderful to share.
Vicki dean
56:49
Fabulous work, where can we see more about your work? What are you next plans
Rachel Kahn
57:00
Thank you for putting the video in the Recap!
Patricia Walters
57:10
Thank you for hosting LaChaun. Great presentation.
Hilary Baker
57:11
So very inspired even without the images. I can’t wait to see your work.
Helen Kennedy
57:27
excellent oral historíes. so important to preserve.
Cheryl Desjardin
57:44
I’m so grateful for you and for your sharing your stories and your work. The name and meaning of Nnenia is so beautiful.
Rachel Kahn
57:51
Where was the cotton spun?
Heather Powers
57:59
Question: In your research have you come across enslaved indigo plantation workers using indigo or weaving with the cotton?
Suzanne Watzman
58:06
Thank you so much, I wish you the best.
dey oh
58:18
what’s the name of your farm and do you own the land or are you renting?
kathy green
58:22
Where is your farm located?
Katie Smith
58:25
LaChaun--this was so beautiful thank you. You talked about the regenerative aspect people experience when they grow their own cotton in order to overcome the trauma of growing cotton as children in an unsafe environment/system. This hit me really hard and I'm so grateful you shared this!
Pamela Feldman
58:57
I am familiar with naturally colored cotton from Peru. They have pink, brown and a green. Are growing these colors?
Adrienn Gorgenyi
59:00
is it hard to grow cotton? and is there a difference in difficulty between the coloured cottons? what do the plants need? how you germinate them?
Patricia Walters
59:04
Question: where to get a copy of the book? Visitors to farm?
Zaharah Shine
59:05
thank for sharing...you have me crying with memories familliar form my family
Gail Trotter
59:21
Please describe how you process the cotton.
Lesley Ham
59:26
Is there a connection between Nigerian indigo dyeing and indigo harvesting in the antebellum South?
michelle gannes
59:56
i'm not sure what quantity you are growing, but our California cotton growers are limited in what colors they grow. Growers in general frown on tainting their Pima Cotton with the other breeds. DO YOU run into issues growing varied colors in your area?
Deb Reierson
01:00:02
Do you have your cotton spun and woven locally?
Katie Smith
01:00:08
I know that growing cotton can be illegal in certain places (because of disease)--can you talk about the process of getting permission to grow cotton?
Susan Cooper
01:00:11
From Susan, thank you for sharing your experience with cotton, I hope your farming experience continues to be fulfilling and expanding
Pamela Feldman
01:00:29
I purchased naturally colored cotton tops from LLBean many years ago. One of the nice things about these garments is that the color got richer each time the garment was washed. What is you experience with the change in color when the garments are washed?
Heather Powers
01:00:31
^^^Indigo labor carried agricultural knowledge from other countries. It's important to recognize that these plantation laborers were skilled and knowledgeable.
Vicki dean
01:00:33
You are so inspiring, I feel very touched by your integrity
Molly Bolick
01:00:34
QUESTION for LaChaun: What can we do to start conversations that contextualize the history of American cotton and dyes for and within the current movement for local and region networks of production in the US?
Mary Lance
01:00:37
Please let us know about the podcast
lisa stankus
01:00:41
that strength you mentioned in your grandmother is apparent in your work
Wendy Feldberg
01:01:10
Le Chaun, can you tell us anything more about the Acadian Brown cotton and its heritage?
Rachel Kahn
01:01:23
Question: where is your Cotton spun?
Peggy Dlugos
01:01:30
stay true to yourself in telling your story. you are a gem!!!
michelle gannes
01:01:54
I have long been fascinated with the Gullah people and their indigo and cotton growing. Did you learn or study with them?
Karen Baker
01:02:08
I have that book. I just talked with Mary Madison on Wednesday. I have her contact information. She would love to know about your wrk. I will email you.
Susan Terrill
01:02:16
I also met a young man in Huntsfrom a family ville al who was from a family of cotton pickeers in Alabama. He was the first to graduate from college.
Jeanne Hupprich
01:02:17
You could write a great book
Linda u
01:03:16
FB has a photo of the exhibit. Botanical Colors page!
Heather Powers
01:03:22
Thank you LaChaun, I just ordered that book!Another wonderful resource for black craftspeoples history in the USA is (website and on IG) is the Black Craftspeople Digital Archive,
Emilie Nichols
01:03:24
Can you post the name of the book?
Zaharah Shine
01:03:25
blackboktore.com
Katy (she/her)
01:03:52
@Emilie I think the book title is “Plantation Slave Weavers Remember: An Oral History”
dey oh
01:03:54
what’s the name of your farm and do you own the land or are you renting?
Hilary Baker
01:03:58
What’s it like to grow cotton- how much cotton did take to produce your fiber.
Zaharah Shine
01:04:25
blackbookstore.com
Lisa P
01:05:04
can you out the name of the podcast you are talking about into the chat?
Katie Smith
01:05:17
I believe the podcast is Weave?
Heather Powers
01:05:22
https://www.gistyarn.com/pages/weave-podcast-about
Julie Tourtillotte
01:06:27
/pages/weave-podcast-about
Amy DuFault
01:07:00
Yes Weave
Zaharah Shine
01:07:29
how did you decide to move to were did in sc
Suzanne Watzman
01:07:39
Can you spell Gulagichi…???so sorry..about misspelling
Heather Powers
01:08:14
Gullah Geechee
Shari Syrkett
01:08:18
Gullah-Geechee
Janice Wale
01:09:14
in Canada there is a company called Belfast mini mills who sell small production equipment all over the world.
Amy DuFault
01:09:24
Janice they’re great
Suzanne Watzman
01:09:25
Thanks Janice
Patricia Walters
01:09:39
Farming is hard work.
Amy DuFault
01:09:42
Lots of Fibersheds working on getting access and funding for those
Sue Malvern
01:09:47
Gullah culture - Boone Plantation. Answer about indigo
Suzanne Watzman
01:09:50
Thanks, Heather
Elisa Kessler caporale
01:10:47
there is an article in the Friday NYTimes about black farmer
Katie Smith
01:10:51
speaking of podcasts--the podcast 1619 does a really good job looking into BIPOC farmers/workers and some of this stuff LaChaun is talking about.
Heather Powers
01:10:54
I think HSBCU's who have Agricultural departments potentially have a lot of work ahead (one avenue).
Sue Malvern
01:11:46
Boone Hall Plantation, Gullah Culture. Page on their website;
Heather Powers
01:12:10
That NY Times article is here: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/04/opinion/black-farmers-covid-relief.html
Janice Wale
01:12:16
We need to save the farmers it is hard work!
Janice Wale
01:13:24
farmland is disappearing
Heather Powers
01:13:25
The International Center for Indigo Culture is working on grants to connect Black Farmers through HSBCU's.
Susan Terrill
01:13:31
This is Susan Terrill. In1988 I was an engineer in Huntsville, AL. I met a young man whose family had worked picking cotton in Alabama all their lives. He was the first man in his family who had been able to go to college. We were taking an antenna course together.
Hilary Baker
01:13:50
Hopefully cover has uncovered the gigantic rock for small farmers and artists.
Heather Powers
01:14:27
*HBCU's (sorry)
annette ehly
01:15:06
Thank you very much.
kathryn gauldin
01:15:07
thank you so much for sharing.
Kate Ellis
01:15:20
Love this topic. Thank you.
Zaharah Shine
01:15:27
thank you
Janet D
01:15:34
❤️❤️ thank you!!
Annette McPhail
01:15:38
Thank you so much, this was amazing.
Shari Syrkett
01:15:44
Thank you, LaChaun. Where can we follow you?
Susan Akins
01:15:50
Thanks, LaChuan. Thought provoking for sure!
Jenny Wilde
01:15:55
Thank you so much!
kathy green
01:16:00
Amazing talk - thank you!
Lynne Swearingen
01:16:05
Great discussion. Thank you!
Monique Sidy
01:16:06
Thank you to LaChaun - Thank you Kathy and Amy!
LaChaun Moore
01:16:09
Thank you all for joining!
Norma Nuñez-Langlois
01:16:11
Thank you for the presentation, great work!
Susan Terrill
01:16:18
amazing work you are doing.
Katie Smith
01:16:18
This was amazing--makes me see a lot of positive things in this world as well as stuff I need to work on--LaChaun: good luck! Kathy and Amy: thank you as always!
Heather Powers
01:16:20
Thank you for this incredible presentation on your research LaChaun! I am in South Carolina and will reach out to you (I grow suffriticosa and dye with it).
Kristina Juneau Alaska
01:16:25
As an indigenous person, I want to thank you for having the tough conversations about the generational effects that have caused current situations for Black and Indigenous farmers. I look toward the future for more growth for us. Best to you LaChaun.
lisa stankus
01:16:45
thank you ! very important, deep work
LaChaun Moore
01:16:45
Yes, feel free to reach out at lachaun@gistyarn.com
Helen Kennedy
01:16:46
I’m wondering about the parallels with churro sheep ranchers among the Native Americans
Rachel Kahn
01:16:53
Thank you@ Brilliant research and project. Where can we follow you or learn more? Do you have a website or Instagram ?
Brenda MerrickHavlice
01:17:04
Thank you
Katie Smith
01:17:34
Exciting!
Helen Kennedy
01:17:45
porfirio yes!!!!!!!
Deb Reierson
01:18:12
Thank you! Such an amazing project.
Ridhi Dcruz
01:18:19
Thank you!
Teresa Heady
01:21:24
Beautiful, thank you for sharing!
Margarida Vasconcelos
01:21:44
Beautiful
Susan Terrill
01:23:09
my daughter graduated from UC Berkeley. I loved visiting her there,
Kristina Juneau Alaska
01:24:12
Lots of love, protection and care sent to the Asian community right now!!!!
Amy DuFault
01:24:14
apexforyouth.org/donate
Eileen Adler
01:24:32
Once again, I am very thankful for all that you do.
kimm branch
01:24:36
thank you for sharing that organization christina.
Morgan Vargas
01:24:43
Wonderful everyone! Thank yoU!!
Katy (she/her)
01:24:50
Thank you so much!!
Annie Hogg
01:25:34
oh no, messed up my times and landed an hour late :(