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APPG on a Fit and Healthy Childhood - November meeting - Shared screen with speaker view
Phil Royal
09:11
My PC is playing up
Julie Pearson
14:27
Hello everyone!
Carolyn Silberfeld
14:50
Hello to you all
Jane Deamer
17:24
Hello everyone, I am new to the group, from The Crysalys Foundation charity developing a free national platform on trauma and would love to network as much as possible. www.tackling-trauma.com
Helen West - APPG Secretariat
18:47
Welcome to the APPG Jane
Julie Pearson
26:12
As they get older, they have more time to absorb messages shared within society! Daisy gets my vote!
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
30:11
as is bir
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
30:12
th
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
30:12
t
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
30:43
and birth to 18 months is also a critical period for physical development
Sarah Williams
30:59
Thank you Vicky that was really thought provoking and it was interesting to hear the views of children and the way in which policy has reinforced misunderstanding
Jane Deamer
32:21
Thanks Vicky, I will explore more about movement in trauma recovery and include in our self-help offer
Vicky Randall
32:42
Thank you Sarah. I think there could be a more significant piece of research that could be done on this that looks at this in much more detail.
Julie Pearson
33:25
Agreed Vicky. This is a much needed piece of research
Sarah Williams
34:13
Agreed Vicky. I think it would be interesting to see how wellbeing messaging (as a result of Covid experiences) is being interpreted by young people
Karen Cooke
47:11
hi Helen yes I can share these
Helen West - APPG Secretariat
48:06
Thanks Karen, I'll also post them online along with the meeting recording
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
48:14
The Early Years Foundation Stage has a focus on the importance of and ways to promote physical development in children aged 0-5 years - therefore, offering children access to high quality settings will provide babies and young children with opportunities to play, move and develop physically will help to develop good habits in relation to movement. It is also a requirement of the EYFS to offer babies and young children access to the outdoors which is often missing in children's lives especially children who live in disadvantaged areas
Karen Cooke
48:21
i will send it over to Helen
EmilyCherry
48:56
I think your question about Daily Mile is really interesting - at Bikeability we want to talk more about encouraging children with the skills and confidence to make 'functional journeys' - eg cycling to see their friends, a trip to the shops, making it more of a life skill than an enforced lesson.
Sarah Williams
50:22
I think play is about autonomy and meaning too
Neil Coleman | OPAL
53:08
Sport England’s three Active Lives surveys for children undertaken in 2018, 2019 and 2020 found that the primary driver in motivating all children to be more physically active (fine and gross motor) has always been ‘enjoyment’, demonstrating that mental and physical health are completely intertwined.The most common activity for children while in school was found to be ‘Active Play’ (child-led, freely chosen, enabled by adults through culture/permission and environment/resourcing but not controlled by them) which has never really been considered as particularly important in school policy by government or its’ agencies.The results of the Sport England Active Lives surveys revealed that “Active play and informal activities remain the most common way for children in younger age groups (Years 1-6) to be active” with 61% prevalence among children in 2020. ‘Team Sports’ came second, with 53% prevalence in 2020.Question - Should government now be looking at what children might want?
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
53:47
young babies can spend a great deal of time in 'containers' - baby care seats, prams, high chairs and so on - students talk about children arriving at nursery and even school in pushchairs - this isn't a judgement on parents, its often because of lifestyle, unsafe environments amongst other reasons
Joseph Lovett
53:50
Hi Vicky, sorry my microphone isn't ball at the moment. I work with The Daily Mile and the feedback from children who participate in the initiative on most part is very positive.... most say that they enjoy doing it. As well as given the opportunity to exercise they can socialise with their peers.
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
55:47
Loved all the presentations… comments:Have you ever seen a child who would prefer to walk rather than run? I haven’t.Beware of minimum standards – they have been shown to reduce standards overall (those below try to move up, and the majority that are usually above the new drift down).Lastly: We expect schools to solve so many of society’s ills. Yet schools are a small overall element of a child’s outcome: parents (3x) and peers (2x) more important.
Julie Pearson
57:30
Agreed Neil. Let children be children.
Carolyn Silberfeld
58:06
I so agree with what you have said about the child's viewpoint.
Keith Godfrey
58:11
Our research using physical activity monitors worn for a week has shown that family-based physical activity remains an important element of children’s activity behaviour regardless of age, from pre-school onwards. This could be applied in interventions to increase physical activity within families.
Jane Deamer
58:39
well said Neil this is snot rocket science
Neil Coleman | OPAL
59:00
Snot rocket science sounds fun!
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
59:01
Spot on Neil. Let the Children Play! (It's also the title of a very good book).
Jane Deamer
59:17
oops
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
59:21
there are wider issues to take into account, such as where children live, is their environment conducive to physical activity for instance?
Helen Charman
59:24
Such an important point by Neil in respect of children's voice and agency. Be great to have any links to relevant research here.
Liz Prinz
01:00:04
At Women in Sport, we're doing some work understanding primary girls' physical activity levels and their attitudes toward physical activity. We're finding that there are some key differences in motivations and attitudes between girls and boys, and I'm keen to hear how boys' and girls' different needs and motivations can be addressed?
Jane Deamer
01:00:12
parental mental health is also so important in child's opportunity to play and move
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:00:40
Lots of Play research from Unis located all over the world going into the current APPG reports on both physical and mental aspects
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
01:01:14
Here's a suggestion: how about doing similar to many organisations (allow unstructured time). Let schools be unmeasured on (say) 20% of a child's school week and encourage them to use that time to be child led and significantly physically active. Child led education has been shown to be much much more effective.
Julie Pearson
01:01:21
Sorry - I have to go. Thank you for the presentations. Great work and even more exciting possible next steps.
Carolyn Silberfeld
01:01:23
One of the major influences on all children having access to outdoor play spaces was the selling off of all the playing/ sports fields - one of the most detrimental policy inititatives
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:02:26
Liz, OPAL is being invited to speak at many events. Michael, 20% of the school year is playtimes.
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
01:02:28
We are safer than we have ever ever been in the entire history of humankind. Spot on Mike!
Sarah Williams
01:02:31
Really good point there Liz and I think that’s why its important that PE offers a breadth of inclusive experiences rather than focusing heavily on sport or fitness models
Liz Prinz
01:03:37
Thanks Sarah, absolutely agree. I think we are making progress on that for sure. We are really keen to think about what happens outside of PE as well, including out of school activities as well as playground activities.
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:03:49
Carolyn, OPAL supports inner city schs with no playing fields. The quality of play and level of activity is just as high as in schs with large fields
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
01:04:17
Prof Ken Ong at Cambridge Uni has done a lot of research showing that fear is a key driver of the lack of PA in children. See also the roaming study in Yorkshire (distance each generation was allowed to roam alone without their parents. Down from 6 miles 60 years ago to the neighbours now).
Keith Godfrey
01:04:21
Consideration also needs to be given to reducing excessive screen time, replacing this with a return to physical activity. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on the benefits of limiting screen time (which is escalating in a truly concerning way).
Karen Cooke
01:05:11
my speaker is not working cant hear anything
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
01:05:27
here's a link to a free Public Health England, ActiveMatters and Open Uhttps://www.futurelearn.com/courses/supporting-physical-development-early-childhoodniversity course
Karen Cooke
01:05:38
back
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:05:48
An example of what OPAL does https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UCex3K_0j4
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
01:05:55
that should have said Open University!
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:07:29
For those who want to read the research https://outdoorplayandlearning.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/The-Case-For-Play-In-Schools-web-1-1.pdf
Liz Prinz
01:09:56
I agree that unstructured play is really valuable. We've observed though that there can sometimes be issues for girls in primary school on the playground, who already at this age are starting to sit on the sidelines during break times while boys dominate the playground and most often the playing field for football. Unfortunately we are still hearing lots of stories of boys keeping girls out of playground football games, and this is something we really have to think about when it comes to motivating girls to get active as well.
Carolyn Silberfeld
01:10:09
Thank you, Neil. I think the work you do is excellent but the point I was making was that the playing fields were accessible to all children and their families at different times, not only school time. I also see it where I live - the fields and spaces where children went with their families has been sold of to build more houses with minimal space and infrastructure for young children
Michael Ledzion (Sports for Schools & Clubbly)
01:10:35
Who invented the term "Physical Education" - perhaps a prof at some clever university? Surely we should be calling it all "Games" or something similarly inspiring.
Jackie Musgrave The Open University
01:11:15
and there's a connection between children's mental health and physical activity/movement, there's been an APPG Fit and Health Childhood report about it https://fhcappg.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/mentalhealththroughmovement_301019.pdf
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:11:37
Carolyn, one of the 18 measures OPAL uses is the way schs adapt to enable more play outside of school core hours. Not always possible but always encouraged by us.
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:14:11
Liz, our client surveys show that girls and boys have 'play equality' once we've completed our work. Schs said that 100% of girls are actively engaged in a wide range of ways every playtime.
Liz Prinz
01:14:55
That's really interesting, Neil. I'd love to hear more about that. It's certainly possible to have unstructured play that works for both boys and girls but does require thought.
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:16:22
Liz, after 700+ schools in many countries we've got a pretty good idea of how to do it 😁
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:17:49
What's really interesting to OPAL right now is how secondary schs are coming to realise the importance and benefits of play in their sch environment
Neil Coleman | OPAL
01:18:04
Issy, I will
Karen Cooke
01:18:25
sound has gone again
Helen West - APPG Secretariat
01:18:52
sorry Karen - there will be a recording online by tomorrow morning and I'll send everyone the link!
Helen Charman
01:18:55
Thank you, super helpful to have links to the research.
vicky
01:18:56
Thanks everyone