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The Future Of… Series: Funding - Speaker view
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
44:55
Questions for you to think about: What would care and entrepreneurship look like in your arts ecosystem, neighborhood or community?
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
45:01
What would you do if money were not an issue?
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
45:06
What does community ownership and democratic governance look like in the art world you want?
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
46:53
N E C = New Economy Coalition https://neweconomy.net/
Julia Clark, Art World Conference (she/her)
48:16
Some notes about today’s program: 1) this session is being recorded. We will send the recording when it becomes available, it will be available until the end of the month. 2) Please write your questions in the chat window. Our speakers will allot ample time for questions. 3) If you’d like to be in touch with us, email ask@artworldconference.com, join our mailing list or become a member at artworldconference.com. 4) Read speaker bios online and click their links on artworldconference.com! 5) Download the GIA Report here: https://art.coop/#welcome
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
52:08
“The term “Solidarity Economy” is relatively contemporary. The term “Solidarity Economy” emerged in Chile and France in the 1980s, gained popularity in Latin America (as “economia solidária”) in the 1990s, and spread globally as an interdependent movement after the first annual World Social Forum in Brazil in 2001, which popularized the slogan “another world is possible.” The Solidarity Economy is now recognized internationally as a way to value people and the planet over profits and to unite grassroots practices like lending circles, credit unions, worker cooperatives, and community land trusts to form a base of political power and transform our economy and world. Most people are aware of the discrete practices and models that comprise the Solidarity Economy, but do not know that there is a term that holds these concepts together or that these practices are supported holistically in other countries around the world.”
Stephanie Orentas she/they
53:58
Thank u Nati
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
54:59
Overview of the actions we ask grant makers to take: https://art.coop/#action
nati linares (she/her/ella)
58:02
Clara Takarabe is an incredible artist doing arts organizing in music: https://www.jacobinmag.com/2019/03/chicago-symphony-orchestra-strike-cultural-labor
nati linares (she/her/ella)
58:38
“We work and labor as artists, but we do not produce material goods. Being a musician is part of being an intellectual, but we are not part of the managerial class of the cycle of economic production. We are neither the managers or owners of capital, nor the workers in the factories, nor the precariat.We do not easily fit into the capitalistic system. And this is a good thing. The best things in life — education, medical care, love, nurturance —also do not fit neatly into economic life.” - Clara Takarabe
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
59:42
Cierra Michele Peters is an artist and the Communications Director of The Boston Ujima Project. Ujima, named for the Swahili word for collective work and responsibility, uses a participatory budgeting process in combination with traditional underwriting to put economic development decisions in the hands of community members. As an artist, her practice includes video, installation, and durational performance. As an artist, curator, and organizer, her projects examine visual, spatial, and sensory representations of Blackness. Her conceptual work uses wry humor to present commentary on subjectivity and ontology against an urban backdrop. Her recent projects include Print Ain’t Dead, a pop-up bookstore and publishing platform and Demo Radio, an underground sound archive. Ujimaboston.com / @ujimaboston / @earthaclit
nati linares (she/her/ella)
59:44
Q: “Describe what your work is, and how these projects started with artists and cultural workers at the center
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
59:56
https://www.ujimaboston.com/
Brendan Martin
01:01:55
I want to join that party
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:02:28
A lot of dis in the kitchen
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:02:30
djs**
Nia Evans
01:02:36
Haha, Nati
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:03:33
Nia K. Evans is director of the Boston Ujima Project, which organizes Greater Boston-area neighbors, workers, business owners, and investors to create a community-controlled economy. Evans has an educational background in labor relations, education leadership, and policy. Her advocacy work focuses on eliminating barriers between analysts and people with lived experiences while also increasing acknowledgement of the value of diverse types of expertise in policy. She is a co-creator of Frames Debate Project, a multimedia policy debate program that explores the intersection between drug policy, mental health services, and incarceration in Massachusetts. Evans has a B.A. in industrial and labor relations from Cornell University and an M.A. in education leadership, with a course of study in leadership, policy and politics from Teachers College at Columbia University. She also studied at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, where she focused on international labor relations.
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:03:42
Aaron Tanaka is secretly a music head - so many Solidarity Economy organizers are secret artists
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:07:55
Makes me think how No Name has been spreading the word about solidarity Economy via starting a collective community space in LA
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:08:21
YES: “To set new norms, people have to feel it. We are creating the air. What you hear, what you smell, what you taste, what you touch is all Solidarity Economy. You can’t just talk about it and swap theories back and forth. In terms of what people see as possible, that doesn’t come from us talking at people. … if we are presenting something that is different, it needs to be compelling enough to embrace it.” - Nia Evans
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:11:10
More info about The Working World https://www.theworkingworld.org/us/our-mission/
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:11:32
Brendan Martin is founder and director of The Working World, a cooperative financial institution and business incubator based in Argentina, Nicaragua, and the United States. Martin originally moved to Argentina in 2004 to work with a group of Argentines looking to support the “recovered factory” phenomenon, and out of this was born The Working World and its methods of non-extractive finance and just-in-time “evergreen” credit. Despite dire predictions of investing in the recovered factory movement, The Working World achieved a 98% return rate across 715 loans, and all with repayments from profit sharing and without guarantees. In 2009, Martin helped open a second branch in Nicaragua and another in the United States in 2012. The same grassroots cooperative efforts have proven effective and provocative in the context of the US. Martin is a 2009 Ashoka fellow, a two-time Ashoka Globalizer, a nominated Prime Mover, and a frequent speaker on the solidarity and cooperative economy.
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:13:48
The Take (highly recommend!): http://thetake.org/
Nia Evans
01:16:02
Our learning is from The Working World and Seed Commons
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:16:31
Nice! And here’s Seed Commons https://seedcommons.org/
Brendan Martin
01:16:39
And Ujima is a member of Seed Commons! And I personally am an investing member of Ujima :)
Brendan Martin
01:17:22
The learning is circular and mutual
Nia Evans
01:17:28
Yes Brendan!
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:18:18
Question: WHY work on MONEY and Democratic FUNDS, of all the things you could work on? And also the specifics - can you say how do someone on this Zoom would invest in something?
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:19:42
Here’s a piece describing Ujima’ work with democratic funding for artists which I mentioned: The Boston Ujima Project is working to create economic equity for artists https://springboardexchange.org/the-boston-ujima-project-is-working-to-create-economic-equity-for-artists/
Nia Evans
01:31:06
Love it. Radical administration
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:31:10
Folks please put your questions in the chat :)
Brendan Martin
01:31:15
“Badass business poets” was our summer band name
Nia Evans
01:31:21
Nice
Brendan Martin
01:31:22
Radical administrators is next
Elias Crim
01:31:39
Great comments, Brendan! Solidarity accounting!
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:31:42
Yeah would love particular stories also from members
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:31:55
Democratic decision-making happening across the board
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
01:32:34
How do we maintain the work WHILE WAITING TO GET FUNDED?!!??
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:33:01
Where are the resources coming from that you guys are democratically allocating? How can “traditional” funders get involved?
Allison Smith
01:33:02
+1 Cierra
Marina Magalhães
01:33:23
I second Lori’s q ^^^^ (I think Nia said something like, “How do we sustain ourselves financially so that most of our work is going towards the work and not towards fundraising?” And that is the question I’m really sitting with)
Angela Zonunpari (she/her)
01:33:33
100% on that 3-year grant cycle funding. That’d be great!
Daniel Sharp (they/he/she)
01:33:46
We should have more Public Benefit Corporations! PBCs are companies who hold their ethics and impact above the interest of stakeholders and profitability.
Stephanie Orentas she/they
01:33:50
Are there any resources for solidarity economy available in Spanish somewhere?
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
01:33:57
yaas Cierra! Can we be funded like everyone else!
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:34:19
In the report we have some updated stats on that @Cierra
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:34:32
“And yet, foundation giving in 2020 documented that only 5 percent of pandemic-response dollars were intended for communities of color.” - art.coop
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:34:32
Yes Steph someone translated the report - we can share
Stephanie Orentas she/they
01:34:50
Dope thanks!!!
Marina Magalhães
01:34:56
YES MULTI-YEAR FUNDING FOR ARTISTS <3
Cierra Peters
01:35:10
Oh, Nia please talk about Residency Residency
Annick Vroom
01:35:14
Thanks a lot for the talk and letting me witness all your work and efforts! Greetings from Amsterdam!
Christa Blatchford
01:35:22
Christa here at JMF- we’re unrolling 5 year funding for artists - really really great to hear the call for this and hope that this inspires other funders
Stephanie Orentas she/they
01:35:32
This talk is sooo so inspiring
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:35:33
^ YES
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:35:50
YAY JMF!
Brendan Martin
01:36:30
Being apolitical was a way to get your art funded (and vice versa) 👎🏻👎🏻
Allison
01:37:08
I want basic needs met so artists can live and dream. I want housing. I want artists to own real estate.
Nia Evans
01:37:25
For being a person
Faith Johnson she/her
01:37:28
SO awesome.
Nia Evans
01:37:30
Trying to live in Boston
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:37:32
How novel
Allison
01:37:32
YES
Christa Blatchford
01:37:33
Totally agree Cierra- love it
Allison Smith
01:37:39
LOVE
Stephanie Orentas she/they
01:37:39
Absolutely
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:37:53
@stephanie orientas, see https://art.coop/assets/downloads/%C2%BFC%C3%B3mo%20pueden%20los%20donantes%20apoyar%20la%20econom%C3%ADa%20solidaria_.pdf and https://www.ilo.org/empent/areas/WCMS_681357/lang--es/index.htm
Stephanie Orentas she/they
01:38:10
Thank u!
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:38:13
Sorry Orentas
Faith Johnson she/her
01:38:39
Yes yes yes
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:38:40
I want to see more community-governed PBS , music.gov
Abbey (she/her)
01:38:41
Yes! Bills, housing, holistic support for artists lives.
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:39:30
Question from before: Where are the resources coming from that you guys are democratically allocating? How can “traditional” funders get involved?
Meghana [she/her]
01:39:44
I’d love to see funders supporting the radical arts administrators — the middle managers trying to retool institutions and artist-support models to be people centered. Like the finance example, I think lots of arts educators and admins lose jobs for trying
Nia Evans
01:39:44
ujimaboston.com/invest
Nia Evans
01:39:50
To learn about investing in the Ujima Fund
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
01:39:56
Do art orgs have to become investors also?
Nia Evans
01:40:09
Money comes from individual investors, foundations, and other orgs
Cierra Peters
01:40:10
Word— less necropolitics, more life.
Nia Evans
01:40:45
We define returns
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:43:22
I’m in the $50 category!
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:43:49
More info: https://www.ujimaboston.com/invest
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:45:17
Why those states?!
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:45:40
Ah. Thank you!
Allison
01:47:55
Can you help me understand why wealthier folks contributing still get returns?
Nia Evans
01:48:04
Good question Allison
Zoë Charlton
01:49:13
wow, thank you for this conversation.
Zoë Charlton
01:49:34
I would definitely like to see more direct support go to artists studying, not a loan, or a fellowship that gets taxed.As someone who has made a decision to be part of academic institutions, I’d like to see better partnerships between arts schools or liberal arts schools with community schools for degrees (and not as internships or ‘additional course work’, which can be extractive, but partnerships in which the work done is valued as course work.).
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:49:48
YES Zoe!
Allison
01:50:35
Thanks
Deborah Obalil
01:51:31
Zoe - what you describe sounds like the Work Colleges model. Most are agriculturally based, but Paul Quinn College is an urban work college in Dallas. It would be interesting to consider and arts focused work college. Work college, btw, is a federally recognized category of higher education institution.
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:52:00
Yes Zoe! In my actionable steps, there’s a lot of study groups forming led by artists studying Capitalism and power, but I agree it needs to be funded better
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:52:17
This is just one community we have met recently: https://www.anticapitalismforartists.com/
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:55:19
From our report: “ith over $890B, the assets of philanthropic foundations in the United States are the highest in the world—eight times that of the country with the second largest philanthropic holdings of global assets. And yet, philanthropic foundations in the United States have among the lowest average “expenditure rate”—the percentage of assets deployed for charitable purposes—often only giving the legal minimum of 5 percent. Havard’s recent Global Philanthropy Report noted that foundations in the three Latin American countries studied averaged an expenditure rate of 13 percent of assets; among the nine European countries studied, the rate is 12 percent, and is notably high in Spain (37 percent), France (34 percent) and Germany (24 percent).
Zoë Charlton
01:55:20
Thank you! @Deborah and @nati!
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:56:40
Yes! Applications designed by artists!
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:56:51
+++
Marina Magalhães
01:57:25
So true Nia… thank you for verbalizing that
Zoë Charlton
01:57:50
👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿👏🏿
Nia Evans
01:57:58
perfect phrase Cierra
nati linares (she/her/ella)
01:59:06
Check out Women of Color in the Arts - I’m a member! If you’re BIPOC an an arts administrator - join us!
Heather Bhandari (she/her)
01:59:53
Thank you, Nati!! :)
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
01:59:57
Sign up at www.art.coop - share it with every artist and culture worker you know!
Meghana [she/her]
01:59:58
What’s the name of the org Cierra just mentioned?
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:00:03
Solidarity Economy 101 course on Friday, May 21st via the US Solidarity Economy Network, Highlander Center and Kolanut Collaborative: https://bit.ly/PHSE101May
Stephanie Orentas she/they
02:00:12
Oh wow
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:00:18
Plug in with Anti-Capitalism for Artists studygroup community: https://www.anticapitalismforartists.com/
Cierra Peters
02:00:23
The CreateWell Fund, Boston Ujima Project
Meghana [she/her]
02:00:35
Thank you
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:00:43
Sign-up to receive the New Economy Roundup: www.neweconomy.net and plug in on social media: @NewEconomyCoalition on IG and @NewEcoomics on Twitter
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:01:50
Support artist-led resistance organizing efforts happening right now like Union for Musicians & Allied Workers struggle against Spotify, MoMa Divest, The Music Workers Alliance, formed to provide resources for out-of-work contractors within all facets of the industry, People’s Forum in NYC, • The U.K.’s #BrokenRecord campaign, which is lobbying Parliament to legislatively restructure the industry, • The National Independent Venue Association, organized by performance hall owners across the U.S. to demand a share of the government’s stimulus (which they secured), • Catalytic Sound, a small streaming service run by a cooperative of 30 avant-garde musicians with the goal of paying its artists fairly, • The Pact, a group of hit songwriters who’ve publicly declared they will not grant songwriting credit to performers, or anyone else, who did not actually have a substantial writing role in a song’s conception...
Brendan Martin
02:02:02
We invest in smoke bombs in the lobby
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:02:08
Y E S
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:02:11
Support artist-led “building” efforts and platforms like:Resonate CoopAmpledGuilded (USFWC’s Freelancer Cooperative)Happy Family Market in NYCSol CollectiveCheck the directory of examples at www.art.coop
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:02:25
Add yourself to it too! https://art.coop/#concepts
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:02:38
Find your local grassroots organizing and solidarity economy-cooperative groups where you are located.
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:02:45
Watch and support grassroots media:Democracy NowThe Laura Flanders ShowBTNewsBlack Power Media
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
02:03:05
Tap in with POOR Magazine lifting up Poor & unhoused http://www.poormagazine.org/
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
02:03:17
Poor peoples media
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:03:19
YES Lori Media Reparations Project
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:03:22
Resources (like the “Next Systems Reader”):https://art.coop/#learn
Nia Evans
02:03:41
Also practice where you are:
Nia Evans
02:03:51
What can you pool? What decisions can you make where you are?
Lori Herrera - MixedKollective
02:04:05
Yaaas @Caroline!!
nati linares (she/her/ella)
02:04:49
Lol Brendan - y ou should go to the teach-in actually. I’ll follow-up!
Nia Evans
02:05:09
ujimaboston.com/join
Nia Evans
02:05:13
ujimaboston.com/invest
nati linares (she/her/ella)
02:05:17
Manifesto for Strike MoMa is powerful: https://www.strikemoma.org/
Nia Evans
02:05:28
https://www.ujimaboston.com/join
Nia Evans
02:05:38
https://www.ujimaboston.com/invest
Nia Evans
02:05:54
https://www.ujimaboston.com/organize
Nia Evans
02:06:19
Thank you Cierra!
Nia Evans
02:06:28
We avoided LinkedIn for a long time
Caroline Woolard (she/her)
02:07:53
https://seedcommons.org/about-seed-commons/
Nia Evans
02:08:41
I like that line Brendan
Cierra Peters
02:09:12
ALSO: Join us tomorrow at Ujima Wednesdays: www.tinyurl.com/ujimawednesdays
T. Hopkins (@TheFoodGriot) she/her
02:09:34
wow... blown away by each and all of your action-oriented BRILLIANCE! thank you so much
Faith Johnson she/her
02:09:35
Thank you all so much!
Allison
02:09:35
Thanks everyone
nati linares (she/her/ella)
02:09:36
Follow us: www.instagram.com/_artcoop <3
Allison Smith
02:09:39
Thank You!!!
Marina Magalhães
02:09:39
Thank you deeply!
Abbey (she/her)
02:09:43
Thank you!
Nia Evans
02:09:46
Thank you all!
T. Hopkins (@TheFoodGriot) she/her
02:09:47
please save chat thread with all the links thanks!
Jackie Chang
02:09:47
THANK YOU!
Pia Singh
02:09:54
Thank you all
nati linares (she/her/ella)
02:10:03
Action steps attached!
Jenn Hyland
02:10:06
Such a great convo!! Thanks all!!
Zoë Charlton
02:10:11
Yes!! Thank you to everyone!
Julia Clark, Art World Conference (she/her)
02:10:14
We’ll share the chat with the recording link
Emma Dunphy
02:10:21
Thank you all!
Daniel Sharp (they/he/she)
02:10:43
Thank you thank you!!
Brendan Martin
02:10:47
Thank you everyone!