Zoom Logo

CIR: Julie McCarthy on Hong Kong, China, and the Coronavirus - Shared screen with speaker view
Sandy C
26:33
Welcome everyone and please prepare your questions for the Q&A period!!
Linda Barker
28:41
Just wondering what kind of crew you have when reporting from HK in those demonstration conditions?
Brian Goldbeck
49:14
Do you see any way in which both sides could save face and back away from confrontation?
charlescase
54:20
How significant is today’s anniversary in Hong Kong for purposes of the democracy movement?
Irene
54:23
is there a significant element of support for HK in mainline China, even underground?
Miles Guerin
55:23
How has the ‘threshold for acceptable violence’ changed in Hong Kong over the last few years?
kathrynjeanhjeresen
56:30
Can you describe what you believe to be the long-term strategy of the current administration toward China. What objectives do you see being pursued?
Irene
56:32
What role can the Brits play? we heard the last British governor speak on the Newshour, saying that UK could protest the contractual violation with Brits.
paul relis
56:54
You mentioned and I have long believed that China has wanted to de-value Hong Kong in favor of Shanghai. I think removal of Hong Kong as a premier economic center is part of addressing its historical humiliation by the colonial powers.
Pam Parfitt
57:58
Where do you think the police come from?...the mainland?...and are any military police used?
Brian Goldbeck
58:41
As noted, the withdrawal of special status rights by the US risks hurting Hong Kong and Hong Kongers more than the mainland. To avoid that, the targeting process then should focus primarily on the mainland firms, banks, etc. in Hong Kong that benefit most from those rights. Mainland-produced goods imported to the U.S. via Hong Kong with finances managed through the Bank of China in Hong Kong might be an example. (Picked PRC targets in 1992 for 301 action.)
Herb
59:42
When I was studying China is the '60s Hong Kong was viewed as a tolerable enclave by China because it gave the CC{P a view of 'the West' that was unique for the. For 'the West' it was a source of our look into China. This seems of little value to either China or the West in the days of rapid communication.
Virginia McCallum
01:03:04
Is Boris Johnson's proposal to accept 3 million from Hong Kong into Britain - with citizenship - likely to have any significant affect on either the protests or China?
Herb Thomas
01:03:50
It seems clear that the Communist Party of China fears “contagion” of liberal democratic values and practices. Is there evidence that Hong Kong Internet activists are having any success at spreading disaffection in mainland China? I heard a (an NPR)? news report that mainlanders are telling Hong Kongers to pipe down. They’ve accepted the bargain of political silence in exchange for economic prosperity and don’t want anyone rocking the boat.
Brian Goldbeck
01:16:53
In the early 200os,Shanghai was supposed to serve northern China and Beijing while Hong Kong would continue to service southern and coastal china plus southeast Asia.
Linda Barker
01:31:02
How widespread is the "middle class" throughout China?
Miles Guerin
01:37:50
What sort of financial shock would occur in China, and in the world, if Hong Kong loses its conduit status?
Virginia McCallum
01:43:01
Might the 3 million gut the protest movement? Likely the young will rush to apply?
Herb Thomas
01:48:13
“It is generally the best policy to make the fewest errors of judgment, and you must remember that, though [a certain country, a certain domestic faction] is trying to frighten you into . . . this idea of coming war, there is no certainty that a war will come. You may think that [China] will be your enemy in the future, but it is not worth your while to be carried away by this idea and to make open enemies of [China] now.” (Re-worked version of Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, I, 42 (p. 61 of the Penguin Classic)