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Removing Our Blinders - Shared screen with speaker view
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
31:40
Good morning! Allie Menegakis from South Caroling for Criminal Justice Reform (SC4CJR.org). Would love to connect with y’all!!
Kathleen Cates
31:58
Good morning! KItta Cates, Healthy Smiles of Spartanburg
Sue Martin, ED, Hemophilia of SC
32:21
Good Morning happy to be attending- Sue Martin, Hemophilia of South Carolina
Jeffrey Fleming
33:05
Jeffrey Fleming- Palmetto Project & AFFA
Gabby Totokotsopoulos, Charleston Wine + Food
34:15
Good Morning, allies! Gabby Totokotsopoulos with Charleston Wine + Food
Langley Shealy
36:50
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pD5a3-v9KZs
Benjamin Bullock
45:17
• What did I struggle with most when considering today’s topic? Why?• How can I apply today’s topic to me, my organization and my community?
Madeleine McGee
45:40
Thanks Langley
Lee Moultrie
46:27
Good morning to all...Lee Moultrie of North Charleston.
Debbie Cooper, Community Foundation of Greenville
01:03:57
I do know what group # I was in
Madeleine McGee
01:04:04
What I struggle with most is that nonprofits in our language and actions have advanced bias
Veronique Marchal
01:04:08
group 12 - easier to chat
TUjcich
01:04:27
Not being afraid to address bias
Sharon Rodgers
01:04:30
we must be deliberate and strategic to make change happen.
Kevin Patten
01:05:06
Group 4 We discussed hiring and recruiting and using diverse pools such as Alumni groups from HBCU's and seeking out more intentionally
Debbie Cooper, Community Foundation of Greenville
01:05:19
Bias are often unintended and unrealized.
Kelly Jones
01:05:33
Our group discussed taking comfort in applying the brain science to things we've been thinking and observing
Melanie Huggins
01:05:38
What we struggle with…The burden to explain bias and/or discrimination is on our black friends, staff and colleagues and it is exhausting. And it is unnecessary. The information is out there.
Veronique Marchal
01:05:41
Group 12: struggle with white being well-intentioned but possibly opinion being too loud | in work to slow down to make a decision that removes biasness not only for NOW decision, but with lasting impact | struggle: how to get others on board to learn and accept that we all have "bias"
Teresa Creech
01:05:43
Group 10: a comment -"From the book, I didn't realize their was such bias within the same communities."
Kelly Jones
01:05:53
And using our own stereotypes to create a good outcome
Gabby Totokotsopoulos, Charleston Wine + Food
01:05:55
also shared about the “whitening” of resumes and college apps. Talked about how to get outside of our current circles to reach different groups of people and diverse voices into our rooms. We talked about succession planning to change all white senior leadership team. Talked about gathering feedback from our folks on the ground to collect feedback about the people we are serving to make sure our resources are reflecting the population we serve.
Dawn Deck
01:06:32
Group 6 - It was expressed that it is exhausting as POC within our organizations to explain biases and disparities that exist; whites are exhausted trying to learn and dismantle their biased ideas.
Natasha Jenkins
01:06:34
Group 9: Struggled with recognizing the bias that we bring to the table in our own conversations.
Teresa Creech
01:06:55
Group 10: With bias being in all systems, it is hard to recognize. we have to keep our eyes open.
Madeleine McGee
01:07:08
Many thanks to Crystal Campbell for sharing her experiences
Kim Atchley - Spartanburg Academic Movement(she/her/hers)
01:07:10
I really appreciate that comment about the comfort in the brain science behind the reality
Renee Linyard-Gary
01:07:12
We discussed our struggle with bias in hiring around race, qualifications and gender.
Debbie Cooper, Community Foundation of Greenville
01:07:19
Bias makes us feel like we need to fit into certain molds for acceptance.
Gabby Totokotsopoulos, Charleston Wine + Food
01:08:50
Group 5 also talked about using resources to remove names and elements from resumes that can cause bias to just see qualifications. Using intention to make decisions of where we put our energy and voices (ex. accepting invitations to speak and participate in groups that are diverse and not only white)
Debbie Cooper, Community Foundation of Greenville
01:08:51
We need to recognize our own Bias and be okay with addressing it and identifying it.
Dawn Deck
01:08:51
Q2 Group 6 - We each have a responsibility to learn, take action, and lift others. We must engage with others who don't look like us or agree with us to expand our mindset.
Madeleine McGee
01:08:52
Sorry group 14 - we didn’t get to that question
Teresa Creech
01:08:54
Group 10- have a diversity retreat with Board and Staff
Kelly Jones
01:09:41
Our group discussed being aware of our own individual biases to improve hiring practices and to make new hires feel welcome and included once they are on board
Teresa Creech
01:09:45
Group 10- often times our staff and clients are diverse, but our volunteers are not.
Kristy Danford (CJCC)
01:09:45
Utilizing data to ascertain disparate impacts, then digging deeper into the formal and informal policies and practices that drive those impacts - and making change.
Peter Zalka
01:09:52
As per the TED talk…have a question or 2 built into your decision making process to expose possible bias,
Veronique Marchal
01:10:15
GRoup 12: hiring practices for jobs in "town acquisition" - looking at resume biasness - reviewing requirements/role
Renee Linyard-Gary
01:10:17
Group 2 - common theme was the intentionality and being aware of bias which can inform policy changes.
Tish McCutchen
01:10:22
Group 3 — It’s not enough to overcome biases in hiring — the people who are hired have to feel like they can be a real part of the organization. The org culture has to evolve, not just HR.
Jackie
01:11:09
Re hiring- there is something to be said for looking for "culture add" rather than "culture fit".
Savannah Ray
01:11:27
^ right, hiring is one thing. Feeling like you belong once you've been hired is another thing (tish)
Madeleine McGee
01:11:39
Because SC remains too segregated by color in where we live, worship, socialize - we as nonprofits have a real opportunity to create and expose our boards, volunteers and community to benefits of knowing and working with people who are different from themselves.
Nesbitt
01:11:46
The VOICE is todays example on tv with their blind auditions as to not show bias; only hearing the voice. Same concept as the orchestra.
Lizzie Bebber
01:12:10
yes-- to continue tish's comment, auditing the internal culture to look at how we operate, how we communicate, how we relate to one another. what is the dominant voice? who is heard? who is not?
Benjamin Bullock
01:12:15
Questions for Breakout 2:• What will I do differently as a result of today’s topic?• How did today’s topic help me better understand racism and white privilege?
Gabby Totokotsopoulos, Charleston Wine + Food
01:26:17
Group 5:
Madeleine McGee
01:26:22
Guys this work is so personal. Many thanks to group 14 for sharing your stories.
Gabby Totokotsopoulos, Charleston Wine + Food
01:26:23
Group 5: Story about Dr. Dr. Eberhardt’s son is very telling about messages internalized. Teach children differently so they dont have the same biases I have. Look at processes and systems that can help mitigate the possibility for biases. Talking to staff asking them what doesn’t allow them to bring their whole-self to work.Realize that we are not so different when we have these conversations.The times of the world are making us more intentional (with the pandemic), reflecting this is how our non-white friends live their lives on a daily basis.
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
01:26:51
Going to have a conversation with our board members and create a program on implicit bias w/ our audience.
Tish McCutchen
01:27:10
Group 3 — keep on learning, keep on listening
Rachel Hubbard, ELP
01:27:23
I work with Teresa and she is having technical issues. I work with Teresa
helenrogers
01:27:23
Group 3 - Give grace to ourselves and to other people #graceism, meet people where they are in conversations about bias and race
Lee Moultrie
01:27:42
Allie, what is SC4CJR ?
Natasha Jenkins
01:28:00
Group 9: Have more conversations about bias.
Pamela Smith
01:28:00
sorry but I have to leave, but I am in a search committee right now and expect to be able to suggest that we widen the qualifications posted to date to consider skill sets that people may have from other fields or degrees
Rodney White Jr.
01:28:06
I think it’s time for people to apply what we learn into practice and take that extra step of speaking about ours bias.
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
01:28:08
South Carolina for Criminal Justice Reform! (www.sc4cjr.org)
Lee Moultrie
01:28:26
Alliie, thank you..
Sharon Rodgers
01:28:27
continue to facilitate and participate in programs and conversations to change this bias and embrace diversity and encourage inclusion. training
Madeleine McGee
01:28:38
WE had a good discussion about folks who have moved to SC and didn’t grow up in the black white world that is SC. We as white leaders need to make it our mission to understand our community’s history and out organization’s history at serving and engaging our communities of color.
Rodney White Jr.
01:28:45
I also think that we should be over with being corrected.
Rodney White Jr.
01:28:54
*ok
Renee Linyard-Gary
01:28:56
Group 2: Be more aware of our circles. Not remaining in our "bubbles" that we are used to both personally and professionally.
Kathleen Cates
01:29:51
to be more inclusive in our conversations so all voices are heard from all cultures
Shaun
01:30:08
Group 12- Will begin to have courageous conversations to create authentic intimacy. Circling back when comments are made that need to be addressed.
Kevin Patten
01:30:20
Group 4 discussed white privilege coming out of WWII and how that created a legacy of generational wealth for white families and how many Black families tried to create despite limited resources and even had that taken by whites ex. burning houses, mass incarceration, etc.
Karyn Page
01:31:34
A similar group was formed in Spartanburg- Speaking Down Barriers. We meet in Greenville and Spartanburg- now via ZOOM.
Madeleine McGee
01:32:06
Rodney - great point. We need to accept and invite people to help point out when our bias gets in the way. Hope you will help me in that way as we work together.
Shaun
01:32:13
Group 12- Need to push forward to work for connectivity.
Sue Martin, ED, Hemophilia of SC
01:33:45
Sharing personal stories from those of color we can feel and relate to however, never having experienced as a person of white color or privledge
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
01:34:24
There’s a stigma w/ being a “racist,” and at times bringing up conversations about racist comments/conduct can create an emotional guilt.
Natasha Jenkins
01:34:40
One of our participants talked about racism/white privilege working in the justice system and how eye opening it was when trying to confront it.
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
01:34:41
which causes people to not want to have the conversation
Sharon Rodgers
01:34:41
you have to ask.
Shaun
01:34:54
Must be intentional with creating the time and space to have the conversations about it, which can be uncomfortable.
Tish McCutchen
01:35:04
I’ve learned to use “advantage” rather than “privilege”. Words matter. Words carry weight.
Crystal Campbell
01:35:04
Being aware for Microaggressions.
Kim Atchley - Spartanburg Academic Movement(she/her/hers)
01:35:18
That's an excellent way to explain it Paige, thank you!
Karyn Page
01:35:26
Just being white in America creates privilege.
Sue Martin, ED, Hemophilia of SC
01:36:01
I think we need to define white privilege, or advantage would be good to have that conversation
Tish McCutchen
01:36:16
@Sue yes
Madeleine McGee
01:36:26
Thank you all for sharing and for caring. We are all learning and growing together.
Madeleine McGee
01:36:41
Let’s include the Harvard test in the fu email
Yolanda Anderson, MMC
01:36:53
Please share the link for the implicit bias test
Veronique Marchal
01:37:07
daily log journal = increase awareness in the moment
Madeleine McGee
01:37:27
Sue Martin - that’s what Heather Hackman spoke about at the summit - google her work
Sue Martin, ED, Hemophilia of SC
01:37:48
Thank you!
Crystal Campbell
01:38:07
Thanks Madeleine and Together SC crew for offering this opportunity. Im the better for it.
Allie Menegakis (SC4CJR.org)
01:38:12
I’ve gotta run to another meeting! Thank you for this great discussion! Allie Menegakis, Executive Director South Carolina for Criminal Justice Reform (www.SC4CJR.org). Would love to connect with y’all sc4cjr@gmail.com
Crystal Campbell
01:39:06
Sue, Thanks for sharing the story and getting the point. I appreciate your feedback and that of our small group. Thanks Kim Atchley for reminding me about my health.
Sue Martin, ED, Hemophilia of SC
01:39:29
I have a call as well so thanks for the opportunity for growth! Knowledge and conversations is power! Thanks all!
Madeleine McGee
01:39:52
t’s not “advantage”. it’s privileged. words matter. not acceptable. advantage a condition or circumstance that puts one in a favorable or superior position.
a special right, advantage, or immunity granted or available only to a particular person or group.
Veronique Marchal
01:39:54
Thank you all for organizing and sharing in break out groups. Would love to connect more communityactionshops@gmail.com - Veronique
Teresa Creech
01:40:05
Thank you, Together SC
Melanie Huggins
01:40:11
https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2016/01/16/white-privilege-explained/
Tannesha Clements
01:40:15
Thank you
Madeleine McGee
01:40:44
See you next month and the month after that!!
Yolanda Anderson, MMC
01:40:50
Thank you for this Brave conversation Space
Savannah Ray
01:40:58
Thank you!
Rodney White Jr.
01:40:59
Madeleine - Of course
Rebecca Tuten
01:40:59
Thank you!
Madeleine McGee
01:41:02
Removing our Blinders may take the rest of our lifetimes