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Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights's Personal Meeting Room - Shared screen with speaker view
Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights
55:47
This meeting is being recorded and the recording will be made available.
Eileen
59:56
great articles. I learned so much
Pat Neary
01:00:43
I have tears in my eyes as I live on native land here at Lake Nippenicket..
Rebecca
01:01:16
Thanks, Eileen and Pat, for sharing that
Evelyn DeLutis
01:03:30
I would like to recommend reading “Braiding Sweetgrass” by Robin Kimmermer to lear about the respect the Indigenous people gave to nature.
CJ Hall
01:03:59
Coushatta/Koasati here. Will having Deb Haaland heading the interior stop the actions from the Littlefields?
Rebecca
01:04:36
Thanks, Evie. Beautifully written book. Even better than reading Braiding Sweetgrass with your eyes is to listen to the author reading it.
Stephen Olende
01:07:25
I'm just starting the book An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States after having had it recommendedon another webinar.
CJ Hall
01:08:10
Yes! That was a footnote on an over 1200 page bill. Criminal to their land-exploited by foreign companies to mine.
Evelyn DeLutis
01:09:06
Also, I would like to recommend a beautiful video made by Holy Cross College which is built on the hills that originally belonged to the Nipmuc Nation and the Packachoag Tribe. I will send the link to BCCR by email. The video is titled “Where the River Bends/ Packachoag.
Rebecca
01:10:41
Thank you, Evie. We will see if we can list the book at our BCCR website: https://www.bccrcivilrights.org/
Evelyn DeLutis
01:11:59
Hi Becky. It is a video. Holy Cross has recently recognized what had been done to the tribe so many years ago and are apologizing and making amends.
Gretchen’s iPad
01:12:09
Atlantic magazine this month had an article saying the national parks should be made Indian land. Do you have an opinion on this?
Rebecca
01:13:16
Thank you for that question, Gretchen
Diana Fox she/her
01:13:17
we are all on stolen lands!
Diana Fox she/her
01:13:36
if we are not Indigenous
Gretchen’s iPad
01:15:01
His point is correct. But what effect would making the parks legally Indian again have?
Diana Fox she/her
01:16:07
What role do you think universities should play (specifically BSU) in contributing to the decolonization process?
Stephen Olende
01:16:52
especially since they've contyributed so much to the colonisation process
Jeanne O. Foster
01:18:30
The Massachusett Tribe are also rooted in parts of Bridgewater.
Carlton Hunt
01:20:27
I'm working on understanding the organization of the Wampanoag nation pre and post 1620. I want to be able to correctly support my two grandchildren who trace their genetics to the Pockonoak (sp) tribe. CAn either of you talk about how the various tribes were organized and interacted? I've, read fairly deeply on this but would appreciate each of your perspectives.
CJ Hall
01:20:58
Fragmenting the people also intensely attacks our way of life. We are a family oriented culture that seeks to provide for our elders and youth in ways that are not the norm in “American life”
Evelyn DeLutis
01:20:58
During the pandemic months we sent hundreds of masks to Poospatuck Reservation in Long Island.
Mar
01:21:13
Thank you for saying that, Hartman.
Jeanne O. Foster
01:21:50
Yes, that is true. Thanking you for sharing some of our history.
Rebecca
01:24:32
Thank you for the questions and comments. Please keep them coming!
Jeanne O. Foster
01:28:06
The maps of the 1600s in the State have clearly marked and labeled territories of each tribe in New England. www.massachusetttribe.org.
Rebecca
01:28:35
Thank you for the info...and the link.
CJ Hall
01:31:32
Centering native authors in your research is key. That is not to say that there aren’t appropriate non-native scholars out there, but the indigenous voice is essential to learning about our issues/histories.
Diana Fox she/her
01:31:33
False reconstruction plays of thanksgiving need to stop with kids dressing as pilgrims and generic Indians. If your kids or grandkids experience this, speak out t the school system. Reenactments for Indigenous kids can be traumatic. Same with Halloween costumes. We can take action in our daily lives.
Stephen Olende
01:32:10
yeah was at a really interestingtalk on taht a few weeks ago. ethnic minorities getting less representation i chiildren's books than inaminate objects etc
Rebecca
01:32:30
https://americanindiansinchildrensliterature.blogspot.com/
Rebecca
01:32:40
Book is by Dr. Debbie Reese
Jeanne O. Foster
01:33:08
The Massachusetts Frameworks need to have Native Education included in what is required to be taught. School committees are part of this equation just as much. Advocacy from the parents of Native children is essential.
Cristina & Raymond Ajemian
01:34:56
Language is culture and represents the people in ways we aren't aware of.
Laurel Davis-Delano
01:35:35
There is a new bill submitted to the MA legislature on the curriculum issue, which you can find here: http://maindigenousagenda.org/
Dominic Boston (he/him)
01:37:07
Thank you for sharing with us.
Katherine Honey
01:37:25
Thanks BCCR another informative program. Unfortunately, I have another Zoom meeting so I need to sign off.
Cristina & Raymond Ajemian
01:38:05
It was delightful to see Wampanoag children and women identify themselves in their language on WGBH "commercials."
Jeanne O. Foster
01:38:19
The Wampanoag Educators have developed a lot of books and curriculums that I used in the Boston Public Schools, along with their Native exhibit at the Children’s Museum in Boston.
Mar
01:38:53
The roots of what we see today with George Floyd.
Carlton Hunt
01:39:51
I greatly appreciate knowing the teaching in the native language. What are the main themes we hould change/add to the general public and private school curriculum?
Pat Neary
01:40:57
Grateful to have Hartman speak to us!
Dominic Boston (he/him)
01:41:21
Can you recommend ways for settlers to learn about existing treaties with the Wampanoag and other local nations and how to honor sovereignty as people on your land? Also, after the plague of 1617 was there any adoption or assumption of sovereignty of territories where the people are said to have all perished? I'm thinking of Patuxet. Thank you.
Dan Simonds
01:42:24
More cluster highers bringing indigenous people in these colonial institutions needs to happen more. Not only these discussions but in positions of power within these colonial structures.
Samuel Baumgarten
01:43:30
The recent efforts around the nation to create more diverse, equitable, inclusive schools and communities have generally not included the Indigenous people. It's time to include the Indigenous, along with people of color, Asian-Americans, the LGBTQ community, etc,.
Diana Fox she/her
01:46:16
Dan--I agree. One thing we learn when we focus on Indigenous languages and perspectives is that "LGBTQ" is a contemporary western social movement terminology and Indigenous peoples globally had words for gender and sexually diverse individuals. The depth of the knowledge is enormous and should be regarded as exciting and full of possibilities for building truly inclusive communities. I'm thankful to Hartman for sharing so much with us.
Laurel Davis-Delano
01:50:10
There is a journal article published in 2020 that summarizes the research findings on the effects of Native American mascots. You can access this article here: http://gonetowar.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Mascot-Effects.pdf
Laurel Davis-Delano
01:51:42
Here are letters from five Native nations in MA (including Mashpee Wampanoag) in support of the MA mascot bill: http://maindigenousagenda.org/native-mascots/
CJ Hall
01:51:45
The podcast “all my relations” discusses this issue from the people directing fighting mascots in the Supreme Court. It’s also the logos used by non-native businesses. They are using our likeness/caricature of our people to make money.
Kevin McGowan
01:53:40
Universities can require all students to take courses on Indigenous People - No opt out.
CJ Hall
01:53:44
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-my-relations-podcast/id1454424563
Rebecca
01:54:01
Thank you CJ
Michael Zimmerman (he/him/his)
01:54:03
Another great podcast, which I share with my students, is Heritage Voices, with a specific focus on issues of anthropology, archaeology, heritage, land management and sovereignty (https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/heritagevoices/tag/indigenous).
Malia Brooks
01:54:29
I’m from Hawai’i and Kanaka Maoli land. Where does the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe stand in the tension between fighting for federal recognition, which remains dependent on the colonizer’s recognition vs. fighting for sovereignty and self-determination outside of the colonizer’s approval?
Rebecca
01:54:46
Thank you Michael
Mar
01:55:53
^^^^ good question, Malia
Rebecca
01:56:40
Apologies to all for my mispronunciation of these words.
CJ Hall
01:56:49
Here is an anthropological look at “othering” https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/david-hurst-thomas/skull-wars/9780465092253/The book Skull Wars
Rebecca
01:57:00
Thanks, CJ
Laurel Davis-Delano
01:57:24
I agree that Malia has posed a great question.
Mar
01:58:24
I can identify, Malia- as a Taino person from Borikén.
Joyce Rain Anderson (she/her/hers)
01:59:30
Read about the Doctrine of Discovery where Papal Bulls from the 15th century set this process in motion. These still govern Indain Law.
Michael Zimmerman (he/him/his)
01:59:36
Thank you for sharing that, CJ. Thankfully, a lot of archaeological practice has changed since then. Not so thankfully, there are still a lot of changes which need to be made - all you have to do is to look at what happened over the last week with the Penn Museum and the SAA Annual Meeting to see how the settler colonialist mindset still endures.
CJ Hall
02:00:31
Blood quantum/tribal rolls are complex issues fraught with contradictions, but in order to obtain sovereignty? Many of the tribes have had to “play” by the colonizer’s rule book. 🤨
Malia Brooks
02:02:22
Thank you everyone!
Jeanne O. Foster
02:03:31
Federal recognition is so political, depending on who the President of the U.S. is, that the Nipmuc received federal recognition from President Bill Clinton, and as soon as he lost the election to President George W. Bush, that was overturned, And I heard at a Native conference at Mashpee, that a recent ruling is that each tribe is allowed only once to apply for federal recognition.
Stephen Olende
02:03:52
Angela Saini's superior is really good on the history of race science and why it is inherently wrong
Laurel Davis-Delano
02:06:10
Here is info on the bills in MA: http://maindigenousagenda.org/
Joyce Rain Anderson (she/her/hers)
02:07:09
Native American and Indigenous Studies Program at BSU contact joycerain.anderson@bridgew.edu
Carlton Hunt
02:08:02
There are many tribes who make up the Wampanoag Nation.
Cristina & Raymond Ajemian
02:08:42
It used to be that one drop of "Black" blood made you Black, but you have to prove a predominant percentage of indigenous blood to be recognized as Native American-absurd!
Rebecca
02:09:06
Dr. Anderson's email address:J10ANDERSON@bridgew.edu,
Laurel Davis-Delano
02:09:17
Thank you, Hartman Deetz, for your presentation.
Jeanne O. Foster
02:09:50
Creating allies with our neighboring tribes is definitely happening in some situations, and truly the hope for the future.
CJ Hall
02:10:28
Yes!! We have a lot of work to do!! Over 570 nations coming together :)
James Leone
02:10:32
Wonderful session, I learned a lot! I am most thankful for the knowledge and experiences that you shared.
Wing-Kai To - Bridgewater State University
02:10:47
Thank you for the informative, truth-telling, sustantive discussion this evening with engaging presentation and participation.
Wing-Kai To - Bridgewater State University
02:11:09
substantive
Wing-Kai To - Bridgewater State University
02:11:21
my wrong spelling
Cristina & Raymond Ajemian
02:11:31
Thanks to all presenters, hosts, and participants.
Stephen Olende
02:11:42
thanks
Cat Stewart-BCCR
02:11:47
Thank you! Really appreciate it!
Stephen Black
02:12:11
Tremendously informative - Thank you!!
DREZENDES
02:12:14
best zoom session this year, and that is saying a lot! THANK YOU ALL!!
Rebecca
02:12:18
Wôpanâak Language Reclamation Projecthttps://www.wlrp.org/Native Land Conservancy.http://www.nativelandconservancy.org/
Cheryl Dromgoole
02:12:36
Thank you all for your time and knowledge of this very important topic.
Rebecca
02:12:37
Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rightshttps://www.bccrcivilrights.org/
Polina Sabinin [she/her(s)]
02:12:43
Thank you so much for speaking your truth. We have so much to learn and to think about.
Kerri Medeiros
02:13:38
Thank you all for an informative and engaging discussion and program.
Arnaa Alcon
02:13:39
Thank you.
sgentlewarrior@bridgew.edu
02:13:54
Dr. Anderson and Mr. Deetz, thank you for your wisdom.
Mia Zoino
02:13:54
Thank you, this was wonderful!
CJ Hall
02:13:57
Aho!
Laura Gross (she/her)
02:13:58
Thank you—and so much to read in the chat!
Jeanne O. Foster
02:14:02
Thank you Mr. Deetz and Dr. Rain Anderson.!
Ryan Powers
02:14:08
Thank you so much! Great evening! Very informative!
Michael Zimmerman (he/him/his)
02:14:09
Thank you! What a wonderful evening!