Zoom Logo

Eugenic Legacies Transnational Education Working Group - Shared screen with speaker view
Susan Schweik (she/her)
34:38
What’s his last name?
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
35:00
I think he said Samuel Holmes
Susan Schweik (she/her)
35:08
Those names? Can’t hear them
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
35:22
Other is Herbert Evans
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
38:25
Did not know Bolton was a eugenicist!
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
38:44
Spanish Borderlands
Susan Schweik (she/her)
51:37
In Iowa where I am focusing often eugenics and “euthenics” were used side by side or even interchangeably
Carla Rice
54:13
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/31508/31508-h/31508-h.htm by Ellen Richards (leading euthenicist)
Ewa Łuczak
55:47
I have always been wondering about the relationship between eugenics and euthenics
Susan Schweik (she/her)
56:19
YES thank you Tony!
Carla Rice
58:47
Is this field gendered (as well as raced)? White women taking the lead in euthenics and white men in eugenics? (Those advocating euthenics in / around Guelph) seemed to be white women - perhaps looking to carve out a space in the public realm during the period of nation building in Canada
Ewa Łuczak
59:53
This is the sense I had too. Domestic space was to be dominated by women ding applied eugenics
Max Fishel
59:59
Not heard of euthenics until now. Thanks!
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:00:19
Carla I think that’s true in my research
Isidro González
01:00:41
Yes, I hadn't heard of euthenics either. Thank you.
Carla Rice
01:00:43
interesting—thanks so much for these insights
Susan Antebi
01:00:55
Carla, that is a very interesting point, especially considering that ‘euthenics’ tends to dominate in certain global regions (ie parts of Latin America)
Milton Reynolds
01:06:19
5 mins
Max Fishel
01:07:35
As Francesca Martinez says, "Can all the normal people put their hands up please?"
Milton Reynolds
01:09:14
We’re at the 2 min mark
Milton Reynolds
01:11:55
No rush, but we are at that point, we will fold into Q and A once you wrap up your presentation Rosemarie.
Mary Wrysinski
01:16:07
Thank you everyone, I very much enjoyed the discussion this morning. I have an appt so I must leave early, but I look forward to the next one. -Mary
Milton Reynolds
01:18:42
I often use the term intellectual inertia to articulate the way these ideas gain traction and are promoted beyond institutions.
Milton Reynolds
01:19:30
The ideology does the heavy lifting, not all of it of course, but it does a great deal of work once the concepts are normalized.
utnvth2
01:21:30
Hi - I have a question... we are using the word 'race' and at times race and ethnicity interchangeably. To my understanding, race is a cultural construct - we're all members of the 'human race'. There are different ethnicities, but the idea of different 'races' - apart from its common usage in culture - is problematic. Do we need to be careful not to adopt the language - and so implicitly the ideas - of eugenicists themselves? Does there need to be some 'distancing'?
Carla Rice
01:23:19
Wondering about who is imagined and coercively positioned (in long term care and other institutions, etc) as closer to and thus offered greater access to death and who is imagined and given greater access to life. Two potent events / processes around which contemporary eugenics pivots - life and death, and differential access to both
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:24:58
Good point about race -- Utnvth2. We should discuss more b/c it's also important that while I agree with what you're saying, "race" also has real effects and is used much more commonly (in the US) rather than ethnicity. But definitely a good point for discussion.
Donna Perkins
01:26:09
@utnvth2 - Yes I agree - this use of language needs to be discussed and understood.
utnvth2
01:26:32
Hi - it's Tom not utnvth2 - sorry, my UCL codename!
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:27:31
Sorry Tom!
Oksana Yakushko
01:28:47
Psychology remains committed to IQ testing; and highly popular books such as S. Pinker (supported by Gates) have moved on from “feeble-mindedness” to “cognitive elites” (certainly concept in Herrnstein & Murray). Pinker promotes genetic sciences that aid eugenic vision of “breeding more intelligent and nicer babies” (his Blank Slate)
Ewa Łuczak
01:29:42
It is interesting the psychology has remained committed to eugenics all those years
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:31:49
There is much pushback in psychology as well
Milton Reynolds
01:32:00
We will wrap this up after Rosemarie’s response and pivot to Trevor’s presentation in order to save some time at the end.
Oksana Yakushko
01:32:09
Psychology in the U.S. starting with G. Stanley Hall in 1880s (fist president of the American Psychological Association) were central to eugenics worldwide (certainly Goddard). Even after 1940s most active eugenicists were psychologists - Garret, Jensen, Herrnstein
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:32:26
Oksana yes!
louly100
01:32:35
In the relatively limited literature on French eugenics, I have come across the frequent use of the paired terms 'positive eugenics' (to designate eugenic policies designed to increase procreation among people deemed desirable) and 'negative eugenics' to denote limitation or prevention among reproduction among people deemed unfit - both of them make me uneasy. Are they still being used in the English-language discussions ? (Louise, at UoLondon in Paris)
Oksana Yakushko
01:32:59
I am not sure there is that much push back in psychology since “neuropsychology” and “genetic” psychologies proliferate - and testing, including of intelligence and personality on normality curves -remains central to the field.
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:33:02
Negative and positive eugenics are used
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:33:21
Hardin saw himself as an ecologist.
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:33:31
Oksana I disagree—my book almost done is about the pushback
Evadne Kelly
01:33:51
In Ontario, euthenics also led to ideas such as the 60s scoop - taking children from Indigenous homes for so called human betterment. (euthenicist idea of “improving” the environment to improve the human race)
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:33:56
Ellen Richards, Euthenics--The Study of Controllable Environment: A Plea for Better Living Conditions as a First Step Toward Higher Human Efficiency. You can see the Taylorism in that title!
Susan Antebi
01:34:08
These are also the oppositions that Nancy Leys Stepan uses in The hour of eugenics (mainly on Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil). She never uses the term euthenics. Soft eugenics in her argument comes from or is associated with Neo Lamarckism.
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:34:12
Thanks Susan!
Carla Rice
01:34:42
How does contemporary eugenics pivot around death (physician assisted death) and is this velvet eugenics or something else?
Oksana Yakushko
01:34:47
Appreciate your book and work. Just few years ago at 125 years celebration of APA the Wall of History openly celebrated Goddard’s testing and the Army Mental tests. Eugenics, outside of couple of books, is never included in their histories or writings.
louly100
01:34:57
I hadn't heard of euthenics before either, though it appears that there is a French equivalent - l'euthénique
Isidro González
01:36:52
In the context of Latin America, check out Lopez-Duran's 2018 monograph. Deals with Lamarckian vs. Mendelian eugenics. Teases out terms like puericulture. https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/lopez-duran-eugenics-in-the-garden
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:37:33
What a great idea
Oksana Yakushko
01:37:34
Thank you all! I write on history and present use of eugenics in discipline of psychology. Looking forward to working together and learning more! I have to leave for another meeting
Tom Haward
01:38:52
Hi Trevor - I'd be happy to do a 10 min slot for you this summer for the OC for SS. Tom. I work in teacher training at UCL. t.haward@ucl.ac.uk
Tom Haward
01:41:27
Also - my doctorate was in how we experience the past through visual media. Happy to help with your graphic novel idea. Let's chat some time?
louly100
01:44:02
Sending a JSTOR ref to an article from a journal issue I edited a few years ago, looking at eugenics for children in the Vichy regime, focussing on French comic strips in case it's of interest: https://www-jstor-org.ezproxy.library.qmul.ac.uk/stable/26378784?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:45:14
Louly100 that link just goes to your firewalled library page. Can you say title of the piece?
louly100
01:46:24
Sorry, Susan - it's L’Eugénisme pour les enfants: Heroes, Villains and Racial Purity in Le TéméraireCatriona MacLeodL'Esprit CréateurL'Esprit CréateurVol. 52, No. 2 (Summer 2012), pp. 59-74 (16 pages)Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Trevor Getz
01:48:02
Trevor: tgetz@sfsu.edu
Sophie Watt
01:49:02
I am sorry I have to go but thank you for this session, it was very interesting.
Milton Reynolds
01:52:40
Tony did some great work on C.M.G. What’s In a Name.
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:53:21
Tony you wrote on CMG?!?
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:54:23
Sue -- where did you get those books? From where?
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:54:33
A bookseller in Mass.
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:56:42
Got it! Thanks Sue. Wow. Do share!
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
01:57:54
Excellent points re. California history, see Benjamin Madley's work on Native peoples. I teach California history.
Debbie Challis
01:58:01
This has been really interesting. Thanks very much. I need to go now.
Trevor Getz
01:58:35
I do think that many teachers are open to finding a different model… if we can help them.
Susan Schweik (she/her)
01:58:53
“Contributionism” has not much been afforded to disabled people as a group
Milton Reynolds
02:00:27
So sorry I missed your presentation Trevor. :/
Susan Schweik (she/her)
02:04:59
Our universities are also sites of reparation—as Ella says, they are eugenic institutions
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
02:05:34
Loving this talk but need to take a break before my next meeting. Thank you, thank you! Great model moving forward for our spring event!
Miroslava Chavez-Garcia
02:05:56
Thanks Milton, Benedict, and everyone else. I learned so much and just ordered a bunch of sources.
Susan Schweik (she/her)
02:06:21
Please do, Donna!
Susan Antebi
02:06:36
I really appreciate the emphasis on shared meaning making, and on de-hierarchizing our work. This is a great model that I hope to keep active.
Ewa Łuczak
02:07:01
It has been a powerful session. I am honored to have been a part of it. I have been truly inspired. My warmest wishes to everyone from my cold Warsaw.
Milton Reynolds
02:08:07
Thanks for a great exchange all!
Susan Schweik (she/her)
02:08:16
]Thank you very much!
Isidro González
02:08:20
Yes, thanks to all!!!
Tom Haward
02:08:35
Thanks everyone. This was really engaging. Thanks Benedict and Milton and everyone else.
Marius Turda
02:08:56
thank you! Very useful and inspiring!
louly100
02:09:01
Thanks, Ben, Milton and everybody - it's been terrific, and I have learned a lot from presentations, chat and discussions!
Simona Ciotlaus
02:09:04
thank you, very interesting and useful!
Isidro González
02:09:08
A thoroughly enriching discussion!
Trevor Getz
02:09:11
Well run! Thank you both!