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Prof. Ruchama Weiss - Shared screen with speaker view
Sandy Altshuler
22:20
so, the example with strawberries not being in the market, connected to shmita. I guess I thought that one of the concepts of shmita would be that each of us would then NOT eat strawberries, for example. teaching your daughter about the concept, rather than figuring out where to secure the strawberries.
Deirdre Gabbay
24:14
Is there a second slide?
Deirdre Gabbay
24:57
About what you are saying now?
Deirdre Gabbay
27:46
Not buying any new clothes for myself this year - modeling a year in which there are fewer dollars in circulation as there would be in a Shmita year.
Rabbi Tamar Malino
28:09
trying to eat more local produce
Deirdre Gabbay
28:21
Building a little free food pantry in front of our synagogue - and declaring its contents hekfer, trying to teach people about shmiat through it.
Pam Silverstein
30:10
is there an application for more psychologic "release" of attitudes, emotions, issues that affect your life
Victoria Harris
32:24
….. Pam - take a look at some of the work on Emotional Freedom Techniques, or tapping.
Victoria Harris
35:49
Sorry Pam - you wanted Prof. Weiss to opine on that.
Deirdre Gabbay
36:33
What about vegetables that re-seed themselves. For instance, strawberries do not need much cultivation. couldn't they keep growing through Shmita?
Deirdre Gabbay
37:25
Didn't Indigenous people live like this all the time?
Pam Silverstein
43:28
thank you Professor! have been following Jews of Color and their take on shmita and antiracism is one of the approaches to the shmita year
amelie
45:37
please advance the slide.
Deirdre Gabbay
51:00
A year for the earth is very much like a day for a human being - the seasons are like the times of the day
Ann Suloway
55:01
It also sounds like if your servant has no way to care for themselves, you are to keep them in your household, but not as a slave, as a bound servant. In other words, abandon the land, but not people.
Deirdre Gabbay
56:23
It sounds like a different conception of loans as well; the idea that if someone is in need, you give to them what they need. If they can pay you back, great, but if not, after 7 years, you stop asking.
Shirley Grossman
56:26
Ron Johnson would disagree.
Ann Suloway
57:32
Don't modern debts disappear from our credit ratings after some number of years, maybe seven?
Peggy Hanley
58:50
We expand the definition of “kinsmen”.
Deirdre Gabbay
59:26
But people are allowed to pay back the debt if they can - so that is also part of kinship, no? This would only free people who really could not pay
Ann Suloway
01:03:01
In modern day, this might include your employees,
Diana Koorkanian-Sauders
01:04:10
Does this teach us some lessons for why programs like the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program are so important - that when we give back to our “kinsmen” in the broader sense this deserves debt forgiveness?
Dave Noble
01:08:06
maybe financial shmat is suspension of payments, not release. No catch up following year. Continue as if shmat year skipped, payments not collected nor tallied?
Ann Suloway
01:09:52
slide, please
Peggy Hanley
01:15:52
Recommend: The Iranian film, A Hero, about debt and remittance.
Ellen
01:21:22
Is the concept of interest discussed?
Pam Silverstein
01:23:48
forgiving student loans
Peggy Hanley
01:26:41
Building trust…within the family, the community, the nation.
Dave Noble
01:29:18
2020 COVID year, rent tallied but collected, while landlords still made their loan payments, not fair
Diana Koorkanian-Sauders
01:29:24
Thank you for the great presentation!
Ann Suloway
01:29:25
My hope is that we learn habits during shmita that we can maintain in the future. Thank you Professor, and thank you, Rabbi, for inviting Bellingham.
Pam Silverstein
01:30:06
thank you!!