Zoom Logo

Oregon Wildfire Impact Panel - Shared screen with speaker view
Paul Daniello
17:32
Greetings from Pendleton, the land of the Umatilla, Cayuse and Walla Walla tribes!
robin galloway
18:53
Greetings from Terrebone where nothing is interesting!
Shawn Morford
19:08
Greetings from the Tillamook Forest Heritage Trust- Shawn Morford
Amy Hoffman
19:38
Hello from Medford!
robin galloway
19:38
Shawn - who was with OSU Extension?
Shawn Morford
19:49
yes- hi Robin!
robin galloway
20:00
Way cool!
Mike Armstrong
20:12
Good Evening from Fall River Estates in Bend Oregon
Colette Govan
20:18
Hello from Eugene
Anne Kilfoyle
20:30
Hi from Tigard
robin galloway
20:37
Where is Fall River Estates?
Jim Kusz
20:51
Jim Kusz Lincoln County County
Susan Steward
20:51
Greetings from Gresham
Christal Johnson
20:59
Hi from Baker City
Lorie Wigle
21:39
hello from Rockaway Beach!
Deb Nordin
23:02
Hello from a lover of our state parks living in Beaverton.
Daphene Sampson
23:13
Hello from Springfield OR!
Bryan Costanich
26:14
Hellooooo climate change!
MARILYN RAPP
30:40
Since 2012: 517,270 avg acres burned because of drought?
Jim Kusz
37:11
These fires are due to a changing climate and predictable.
Bryan Costanich
38:39
It’s also due to timber harvesting. We lost most of our remaining Old Growth in the 80s, and Old Growth is notoriously impervious to fire.
Bryan Costanich
39:21
Of course, they go hand in hand, since it forms a biofeedback loop; removing big trees affects climate
Ellen Malloway
41:41
Bryan, I'm interested in what you said about old growth's fire resiliency. Where is the data that demonstrates this?
Bryan Costanich
42:54
There’s piles of research and data on it, easily google able: https://www.google.com/search?q=old+growth+forest+fire+resistant&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS881US881&oq=old+growth+forest+fire+res&aqs=chrome.0.0i457j69i57.3528j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
John Goetz III
43:26
Good question Ellen.No one could've predicted the severity of these fires and the number of environmental factors that influence events as such are more numerous than we understand
Ellen Malloway
43:44
Thank you!
Bryan Costanich
43:51
This is a great paper: https://www.fs.fed.us/rm/pubs_other/rmrs_2007_binkley_d001.pdf
Bryan Costanich
44:30
Fire doesn’t even reach up to the understory our old growth fir and cedar
Ellen Malloway
45:06
Very helpful! Thank you, Bryan!
Shirley Marc
45:30
The same is true of the Redwoods.
Bryan Costanich
45:44
Yup!
John Goetz III
48:08
The understory is composed of the smaller trees, shrubs and herbaceous layer and downed wood and other organic material of an older forest which is generally what burns first and carries a fire.Are you referring to the lower branches of an older forest stand?And indeed even older forests experience stand replacing fires.
Harry Apelbaum
48:28
Smells like a lack of appropriate funding, poor management, mixed priorities, and climate change all thrown in an oil barrel and lit on fire.
Harry Apelbaum
48:57
I know it’s very complicated, no?
Bryan Costanich
50:10
@John; there are a number of reasons that Old Growth forest are resistant to fire. It’s not just that the lower branches are high. It’s also their thick bark, high water content, and other, more complicated relationships they form with the plants, fungi, and other things around them.
Bryan Costanich
50:28
I was just giving that as an example of one reason they are fire resistant.
Jessica Rumin
53:28
Sorry if you already addressed this, but how are we going to prevent this devastation in the future? I don't know anything about this topic, but I have heard controlled burns prevent a bunch of tinder to fuel larger fires. I believe the Native Americans used to do this practice? If we can't this under control, people are going to start moving north!
John Goetz III
54:18
Copy that.I was seeking clarification to understand your comments Bryan.
MARILYN RAPP
54:27
Harry that is that is a more realistic observation. Funding, lack of management, lots of emotions and speculation as well.
MARILYN RAPP
56:44
I agree Jessica Rumin, how are we going to prevent this devastation in the future? Over 2700 people without homes in Talent and Phoenix. Tragic losses.
Dawn Moser
56:45
Have lived in so Oregon, fire danger always in mind, but drove to Mill City, Detroit yesterday, never have seen this level of devastation.
Lynn Burditt - USFS
58:57
The BAER Summaries can be found at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7222/
Ellen Malloway
59:49
Thank you, Lynn!
Lynn Burditt - USFS
01:00:53
Oregon Page for Wildfire Recovery https://wildfire.oregon.gov/
Kyla Zaret
01:03:27
This oped in the Oregonian by Tom Spies (fire ecologist) gives some good context for understanding Labor Day's fires and changing fire regimes in west and east side forests in Oregon: https://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/2020/09/opinion-look-to-wildfires-history-to-better-prepare-for-next-one.html
Brenna Bell
01:03:49
One approach to preventing this tragedy in the future is for the government to invest money in communities to help them better prepare - home hardening, removing vegetation near houses, making community fire plans, etc. There is a proposed federal Wildfire Defense Act that would do just that: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/2882
Jessica Rumin
01:04:28
Thank you for this update
Jessica Rumin
01:04:44
Does the state of Oregon have any responsibility with regard to controlled burns?
Michelle H
01:04:47
Jessica - There is absolutely some great potential for using controlled burns to reduce fire severity in the future. To learn more about Native American use of prescribed fire, this was a great presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXa0674HpdQ
Jessica Rumin
01:05:19
Thank you for those resources
Michelle H
01:05:22
(this just from another viewer, but check out Lomakatsi for more resources on this topic)
MARILYN RAPP
01:05:24
These are our lands and our tax dollars at work. Follow the money. Where are the priorities to stop these mega fires? We are all fed up with smoke filled summers, hearing about climate change, drought? Not all years since 2012 have been in drought. Let’s be honest.'
Rachel Freifelder
01:07:46
It’s well documented that larger trees, especially Doug-fir and ponderosa pine, are very resistant to fire, and that older forests hold more moisture. Recently logged sites are drier and more fire-prone: slash burns easily, decreased shade makes it warmer, less tree cover means more wind. A few years after a fire the abundant growth of young trees and brush provides abundant fine fuel to carry fire.Yes, old-growth stand do experience stand-replacing fires, but given the same spark and the same external conditions, a logged forest will spread fire faster and with higher intensity than a never-logged old growth forest.The White River Fire burned through a large area of Mount Hood NF. The highest intensity fire as well as soil and vegetation damage was a small area that was logged in the last two years. Adjacent never-logged stands burned at much lower intensity.
MARILYN RAPP
01:07:46
Not coming back in our lifetime. Exactly.
Bryan Costanich
01:08:24
@Rachel, nailed it.
Bryan Costanich
01:09:02
Also, re: follow the money, most folks don’t know that as taxpayers we actually subsidize logging. Meaning our tax dollars pay to have folks remove logs removed from our forest.
Bryan Costanich
01:09:05
“· Taxpayers subsidies for the federal logging program ranged from $1.6 to $1.8 billion per year in fiscal years 2013 through 2017. The estimated losses are conservative as they do not include logging related damages to water, soils, wildlife and other resources.”
Casey Taylor
01:09:43
@Robbie, thank you for the science-based update. Really appreciate it.
Harry Apelbaum
01:11:25
How about stopping mass logging and slowing into sustainability? Is that a thing? Our state is practically naked out there.
Laura Fredrickson
01:12:46
I appreciate the full and thorough explanation of why it isn't safe to go back into the forests at this time. I also appreciate getting a better understanding of the different mandates that each of these agencies must comply with. For instance, the Oregon Department of Forestry generates income for local counties to support their infrastructure and school systems, etc. Really great delivery of information, thank you!
MARILYN RAPP
01:13:45
Bryan: Logging always gets the bad rap, the scape goat. Only $1.8 billion, you’d think there’d be some funds for fire prevention. It’s a vital industry here in Oregon.
Bryan Costanich
01:14:26
Why though? Why are we, as tax payers paying for folks to log? Why are we giving our forests away?
Harry Apelbaum
01:14:29
Logging done right is ok.
Brenna Bell
01:14:43
Its also important to remember that these large fires are weather events, like hurricanes and tornados- its not a question of stopping or even controlling them, its a question of how best can we prepare and increase community resiliency.
Shirley Marc
01:16:32
Thank you all for this presentation. And appreciate the links you will be sending.
Bryan Costanich
01:16:32
@Harry, this is an interesting read: https://www.streetroots.org/news/2019/10/18/taxpayers-prop-biggest-carbon-culprit-oregon-timber
Harry Apelbaum
01:16:53
thanks!
Bryan Costanich
01:17:11
Certainly there is a sustainable way to manage a renewable resource such as the forest, but we are so far away from that.
MARILYN RAPP
01:17:51
Bryan: Forests make jobs. Do you live in a stick built home? How about that last book you read? Railroads need lumber…it’s a vital resource. Imagine the world around you without it.
Bryan Costanich
01:18:14
So let’s find a sustainable way to manage it.
Sara LaChapelle
01:18:22
Thank you so much for conducting this webinar. Thanks for your work and time panelists.
Bryan Costanich
01:18:38
Instead of subsidizing billion dollar corporations to harvest our timber and ship them offshore.
rory everitt
01:19:01
Yes, thank you for your time, panelists. I really appreciate how informative this hour was.
Chris Meeker
01:19:09
Thank you to all of you presenters as well as attendees.
Jessica Rumin
01:19:44
Preventing the scale of these fires seems as important as replanting, if not a higher priority possibly?
Jessica Rumin
01:19:49
Thank you for this opportunity
Jessica Rumin
01:19:56
This is a very important topic
Christopher Plechot Binder
01:19:56
Thank you very much for your time! I really appreciate events like these!
Larry Risch
01:20:17
https://www.fs.fed.us/ivm/
rory everitt
01:20:20
When a particular acre burns, is there a “safe” period of years for which it highly likely to burn again?
Larry Risch
01:20:33
Good site for what is open?
rory everitt
01:20:47
*highly unlikely
robin galloway
01:20:58
How can we learn from this catastrophic fire event to move towards more biodiverse forests and move away from the revenue generation pressure on our forests?
Mike Armstrong
01:21:07
Hello Robin - sorry I just saw your question. Fall River Estates is just S. of Sun River and N. of La Pine in Central Oregon. We are a small community out in the forest off of S. Century by the Fish Hatchery.
Laura Zalent
01:21:10
All these fires can be seen as a indirect subsidy to the fossil fuel industry. Perhaps they should foot the bill for all this rather than taxpayers. Not holding my breath here.
Jessica Rumin
01:21:28
Wildfires aren't necessarily bad, right? They kill disease I thought. It's a matter of the scale in recent years
Mike Armstrong
01:21:54
This is Mike Armstrong viewing from Fall River Estates
Bryan Costanich
01:22:03
@Jessica: Wildfires are part of the natural process of forest. What we’re seeing is wildfires that are way outside the natural balance.
Harry Apelbaum
01:22:16
wildfires are necessary. just not like this.
Harry Apelbaum
01:22:55
btw buy a HEPA filter if you don’t already have one.
Shirley Marc
01:22:58
Letting campers in public and private campgrounds burn fires is crazy. The last place I camped was in an RV park with forest all around it and tall grasses. It was very windy and people had their stupid fires in their little fire rings with grass all around it. This has got to stop.
Mike Armstrong
01:23:06
We have serious concerns regarding fire abatement in Fall River as we only have one entrance.
John Vredenburg
01:23:13
Thank You
Harry Apelbaum
01:23:31
1) get informed
Harry Apelbaum
01:23:39
thanks all!
Daphene Sampson
01:23:39
Thank you for a great webinar!
Deb Woodcock
01:23:39
Thank you for doing this.
Deb Nordin
01:23:41
thank you
Lynn Burditt - USFS
01:23:41
thanks for the quality dialogue - look forward to viewing all of the chat and questions
Len Wyatt
01:23:42
thank you all...
Linda Grove
01:23:44
thank you!!
rory everitt
01:23:54
Good night. Thanks!
Bryan Costanich
01:23:57
Thanks!
Jane & Ed Wilson
01:23:59
thank you for all information. love the set up of the tree fund.
Larry Risch
01:24:00
Thanks
John Goetz III
01:24:42
Great stuff, thanks yall!
Anne Kilfoyle
01:25:11
Great presentation, thank you!
Shawn Morford
01:25:41
Thank you all.