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Patty Lavelle and Nicole Parish, STORIES FROM THE GARDEN, School Learning Garden Network Workshop - Shared screen with speaker view
Beth Sharlin
35:48
Hi! I'm Beth. I am the lead green team parent volunteer at John Rogers Elementary in Seattle.
Lily Cason (she/her)
36:27
I'm the Youth Education Coordinator at the Snohomish Conservation District and we work with schools to do lessons in classrooms and also to do green schoolyard projects including installing rain gardens and rain barrels
Tres
36:56
Tres Tracy Ballon--Parent at Thornton Creek--former Landscape Committee Chair helping to maintain landscape around school and coordinate with teachers for gardening needs.
Karen
43:25
I am a teacher at a Montessori school
Karen Hogan Li
43:50
I am a garden educator/parent at Pathfinder K8
Shawn LeValley
44:22
Shawn levalley 2 nd 3 Rd grade teacher. vege garden
tanya kamila
44:24
Hi. I'm a teacher at Stevens Elementary.
Emma Vielbig
44:25
Hi I’m Emma and I’m a Paraprofessional at Gatewood Elementary trying to learn more to get involved in our school garden
Susan Rushing
44:52
Susan Rushing educator developed a garden program for our students who reside
Vicki
46:35
Hi! I am a garden educator and parent at Montlake Elementary.
Carrie Bauer
01:00:18
Aha moment: child says "this means our food comes from the dirt? Not a can"?
Sara Drogin
01:00:57
Aha moment from group 3: A child discovers, after peeling a softened large bean, that there is actually a baby plant inside the seed!
Beth Thiel Walla Walla VAlley Farm to School
01:00:59
A student described as a "challenge" in the classroom started connecting the dots in the garden about an investigation and the relationship between temperature and mulch. When he explained his reasoning, he turned to me and said "Wait! Did I just figure out science?"
Barbara Silva
01:01:31
We didn't get to picking our responder, but we had common stories about kids' amazement over the size of Mammoth sunflowers.
Susan Rushing
01:01:38
what happens after the flower of a pea plant seeing the pea
Laura L Barker
01:01:53
Kids are not at all squeamish about handling worms!
Emily Bishton
01:01:56
Our sTories: children discovering the spicy taste of Mustard Greens, Sorrel, etc and showing their enthusiasm to other children and adults, a child discovering and extolling the benefits of leftover “leaf water” from bedding the worm bin, children discovering edible flowers
Samantha Fogg
01:02:54
We used to have 1st graders weed for 10 minutes and they would fill 2 yard bags. One with weeds more compacted down, and one with weeds not compacted but overflowing. We'd ask "which bag has more weeds" and they'd start talking about how you define more and then they'd step back and notice how different the landscape looked after a group of students was weeding for only 10 minutes. Seeing them working together and really thinking about how their world works is always really wonderful.
Karen Hogan Li
01:03:35
A kindergartener came out into our garden and saw one of our Mammoth sunflowers and was able correlate the size of a mammoth he had just learned about in the classroom. His eyes lit up with putting the two together.
Sharon Siehl - Tilth Alliance
01:15:54
Feel free to put questions in the chat box — we are monitoring the chat and will ask them to the presenters at the end of the presentation.
Barbara Silva
01:19:47
Just curious where you got the blackboard? Is it just one that came out of a school?
Emily Bishton
01:20:31
It’s just a 4x8 piece of plywood that I painted with black chalkboard paint from the hardware store
Barbara Silva
01:20:46
Thank you!
Sharon Siehl - Tilth Alliance
01:29:28
I believe there is a climate change garden in the back area of the UW Center of Urban Horticulture.
Sharon Siehl - Tilth Alliance
01:29:48
That is from the same project that Patty mentioned
Susan Rushing
01:30:39
you can eat the yummy red flowers
Emily Bishton
01:31:24
Boys and girls both like to make necklaces by stringing the beans when first harvested
Karen Hogan Li
01:32:36
Emily do they use plastic needles to string the beans?
Emily Bishton
01:33:10
Yes but you have to get the thinnest ones to avoid bursting the beans
Sharon Siehl - Tilth Alliance
01:34:35
Resource: Children’s book: “Sylvia’s Spinach” by Katherine Pryor, Seattle author
Emily Bishton
01:35:21
A lot of times, kids who don’t want to eat a spicy radish root will happily eat the sweet and spicy radish flowers
Sara Drogin
01:35:37
and the seed pods!
Emily Bishton
01:36:13
Kids love to eat kale and collard flowers and pods too
Lily Cason (she/her)
01:36:57
What have you found to be good systems for maintaining gardens over the summer?
Emily Bishton
01:37:32
Drip irrigation on a timer is swesome
Sharon Siehl - Tilth Alliance
01:37:44
Please drop a question for Nicole or Patty in the chat:
Cheri Bloom
01:37:48
Thank you both so much. It is always great to hear about how different garden educators organize their programs. I always learn something.
Shawn LeValley
01:38:51
where to get funding for drip irrigation and timer?
Cheri Bloom
01:39:06
Try the Lowe’s school grants
Kas Kinkead
01:39:10
question: Nicole - do you have to establish relationships with teachers yourself, or do they come to you? why the 3rd graders at Decatur - is that teacher preference? can you both talk about how teachers integrate your education
Gretchen DeDecker
01:39:32
It is important that any irrigation in the garden is consistent with Seattle School District Resource Conservation policies.
Beth Thiel Walla Walla VAlley Farm to School
01:39:35
I'm looking for some great methods to maintain school garden pathways long term. The wood chips decompose and eventually provide growing medium and landscape fabric protects the weed roots from pulling....these gardens are working for around 10 years
Barbara Silva
01:41:41
I also use sign up genius for summer volunteers, but started this year only allow one family per day due to Covid, and now, just a few families a day total with the time periods spread out.
Emily Bishton
01:41:51
Some scout troops might be interested a watering as a service project
Barbara Silva
01:42:14
Try Ocean Guardian School Grants for school gardens if you haven't yet. They give up to $4000 per year.
Shawn LeValley
01:43:14
thank you everyone
Emily Bishton
01:43:26
Might check with City of Seattle Dept of Resource Conservation or King Conservation District for funding for water-saving drip irrigation
tanya kamila
01:44:22
Hi Nicole -- I'm waving!
Carrie Bauer
01:45:36
For 3rd grade it's part of their science program in sps
Jeannie Revello
01:45:50
3rd grade science has traditionally had a plant growth unit, though that is changing with the new curriculum adoption
Emily Bishton
01:46:08
To Beth: If you don’t use landscape fabric under your wood chip paths, you will avoid the problem of weed roots stuck in it. Without the fabric, weeds in wood chip paths are easy to pull or dig out
Kas Kinkead
01:47:42
RESOURCE: for high school and middle schools - the WAC 180-51-068 - identifies outdoor spaces as valid for required lab spaces (15) Definitions:(a) "Laboratory science" means any instruction that provides opportunities for students to interact directly with the material world, or with data drawn from the material world, using the tools, data collection techniques, models and theories of science. A laboratory science course meeting the requirement of subsection (3) of this section may include courses conducted in classroom facilities specially designed for laboratory science, or coursework in traditional classrooms, outdoor spaces, or other settings which accommodate elements of laboratory science as identified in this subsection;
Gretchen DeDecker
01:49:11
Thanks Kas!
Emily Bishton
01:49:12
Magnuson Children’s Garden has had hundreds of square feet of wood chip paths for 19 years, the soil stays soft underneath even with hundreds of kids walking up and down them
Kas Kinkead
01:49:42
suggestion: need to top off the wood chips every two-three years - arborist chips can be free.
Kas Kinkead
01:50:13
or the district could supply
Kas Kinkead
01:50:48
is garden education a part of the science education formally?
Kas Kinkead
01:51:17
and funded??
Gretchen DeDecker
01:52:00
Would Nicole like to share some tips in a future zoom on how to create a video for some of our garden educators?!! :)
Kas Kinkead
01:52:09
how can we fund garden educators at our schools that lack volunteers and parent involvement
Shawn LeValley
01:52:27
Nicole can you share some of these lessons as exemplars?
Shawn LeValley
01:53:47
awesome. thank you!!
Carrie Bauer
01:53:58
Thank you Nicole!
Susan Rushing
01:54:26
I received 500/ year through a grant funded by Katie’s Krops
maryslatt
01:54:26
Thank you Nicole for sharing. I would love to see those videos
Kas Kinkead
01:54:59
a really important issue today - equitable funding for our kids
Emily Bishton
01:54:59
The beauty of doing more online garden education is that it doesn’t cost anything extra to share it!
Carrie Bauer
01:55:04
Thanks all!
Barbara Silva
01:55:06
Thank you!
Karen
01:55:14
This was a great learning! Thanks for your experience and visuals!
Laura L Barker
01:55:26
see you soon!
Beth Thiel Walla Walla VAlley Farm to School
01:55:27
To Emily: thanks need to remove it I guess. it's been in place for years.
Gretchen DeDecker
01:55:27
This was wonderful. Thanks Nicole and Patty!
Lily Cason (she/her)
01:55:35
Thank you!
Emily Bishton
01:55:46
looking forward to the next one- thanks everyone
maryslatt
01:55:49
Thank you so much. Can’t wait for the next one.
tanya kamila
01:56:06
Thank you. So many ideas!
Karen Hogan Li
01:56:07
Thank you so much Patty and Nicole !
Tres
01:56:32
Thank you!