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Embarking on the Anti-Bias Education Journey - Shared screen with speaker view
Anna Hartman
24:42
Welcome, everyone!
Howard Eisenberg
25:06
Hello!
Anna Hartman
25:07
We are so happy you are here!
Christopher Stetson
25:18
Hello!
Howard Eisenberg
26:33
Alyse Eisenberg-Dallas, Jewish Federation
Liz
26:47
Liz Sherman BJE Wilmette IL
Heidi Chait
26:51
Heidi from ABCD Head Start Boston Mass :)
Janet Sear
27:01
Janet Sear BJE Chicago
Ali Hurewitz
27:03
Ali Hurewitz, Temple Sinai Nursery School, Washington DC
Abby Aloni
27:05
Hi everyone! Abby from Bernard Zell Anshe Emet Day School in Chicago
Dominique Viteretto
27:10
I'm Dominique Viteretto from South b
Dominique Viteretto
27:16
South Burlington , VT
Christopher Stetson
27:22
I'm Chris Stetson, I'm an Infant-Toddler teacher at the Smith College CECE in Northampton, Massachusetts. Hi!
lynne mcewen
27:22
lynne McEwen Dexter Southfield, Brookline MA
Susan A
27:27
Susan Anderson- Bloomington, IN
Ray Sherman
27:48
Ray Sherman JCYS Wicker Park Chicago, IL
Charleen Kuykendall
27:58
Charleen Kuykendall Gan Preschool San Rafael, CA
Sharon Cuddy
28:17
Sharon Cuddy Kindergarten teacher in Somerville MA
Gretchen
28:19
Gretchen Cauble-Chatham MA
Melissa Quinn
29:29
preschool in Wakefield, MA
Anna Hartman
29:51
—Ilana Dvorin Friedman is a child development consultant, instructor, and researcher. She is passionate about Jewish early childhood education, giving voice to educators’ experiences, and designing and implementing professional development opportunities. Ilana’s work focuses on reconceptualizing the roles of social justice and inquiry in the early childhood classroom. Over the last decade, she has been an adjunct instructor at a variety of academic institutions teaching courses, such as child development, family and culture, and social and historical perspectives on early care and education. Ilana is the advisor for the JUF Cohort in Erikson Institute’s MSECE online program. She graduated with her PhD in child development from the dual program at Loyola University Chicago and Erikson completing her dissertation on gender beliefs of teachers in Orthodox Jewish early childhood programs. Ilana lives in Chicago with her husband and their four children.
Anna Hartman
30:08
—This is Anna Hartman, your friendly notetaker :)
giovonnemarycalenda
30:16
Giovonne Mary Calenda from Lincoln School in Providence, RI
Anna Hartman
30:53
—As we discuss issues of identity and justice, you might feel a little uncomfortable. Some disequilibrium.
Anna Hartman
31:26
—Might be especially challenging if you have experienced being marginalized or if you feel you have benefited from someone else’s marginalization.
Anna Hartman
32:27
—We believe we can change. This mindset is key. Development and learning as lifelong processes.
Anna Hartman
33:31
—Q What would you do as the educator witnessing this play?
Anna Hartman
34:32
—Q: Who am I? (What captures your attention about yourself?) 60 seconds to write down descriptors of yourself.
Gretchen
35:27
A woman, an educator, a wife, a friend, an aunt, a neighbor, a gardener, a chef, a listener, a do-er, a daughter, a bartender, a
Anna Caplan
36:07
Jewish, musician, editor, woman, partner, co-parent, mom, bisexual, married, musical theater fan, reader, entrepreneur
Anna Hartman
36:37
—What categories do your responses fit into?
Renana Keynes
37:31
I said white, but I don’t know if I would have a month ago!
Anna Hartman
38:14
—Ilana reflects Robin Diangelo, in her book White Fragility, reflects on how members of dominant groups may leave out that group in identity description
Christopher Stetson
38:27
I am a musician. I am an early childhood educator. I am an older white man. I am a father and a husband.
Anna Hartman
38:57
—This exercise sets us up for the work ahead as we explore social identities and anti-bias.
Anna Hartman
41:37
—We might have feelings about protecting children and safeguarding them.
Anna Hartman
44:05
—When we talk about the child, young children also have social identities they bring into our classrooms. We want children to have agency and voice in the decisions they make about themselves. Want child active in that process. We do talk about children as sponges, but we want to make space for them to actively construct their identities, even while they swim in a sea of all kinds of messages.
Anna Hartman
44:22
—Racism as a smog that we breathe in by virtue of living in our society.
Anna Hartman
44:44
—These messages are more and less overt.
Anna Hartman
44:59
—There is also Gender Binary smog we breathe in.
Anna Hartman
45:25
—As children swim through this sea, they are working through stereotypes, contradictions, expectations, and misconceptions
Anna Hartman
45:38
—How is this happening in their interactions?
Anna Hartman
45:52
—How they navigate that can be based on their relationships.
Anna Hartman
46:25
—“Wow I love you new shirt” might convey a message of classism. My self worth might be related to the material.
Anna Hartman
47:08
—Sometimes children talk about gender without words.
johanna perlin
47:23
reminds me of Alfie Cohen's teachings
Anna Hartman
47:27
—Perhaps there is gendering in the layout of the classroom.
Celeste Finn
47:27
And they get these messages through our nonverbal reactions and expressions!
Anna Hartman
48:09
—Our job is to recognize the messages we may be sending. Implicit bias.
Dominique Viteretto
48:10
Anna I really appreciate your notes! Thank you!
Anna Hartman
48:16
—@Celeste, yes!
Anna Hartman
49:55
—You’re welcome!
Renana Keynes
50:41
Are you going to share ways to set up our classrooms to be less biased?
Celeste Finn
50:56
I think it is important to note- we are striving to implement an Anti-Bias approach to ECE. The learning curve is steep, and their is intention vs reality, which is hard to measure
Anna Hartman
55:55
—How do we represent family in our classrooms? Do we have representations of all kinds? Do we allow open ways of sharing? How to avoid scripts, since they can undermine children’s ability to develop own positive identity?
Jenna Turner
56:11
The recording and resources will be posted on www.jparadigm.org/webinars
Anna Hartman
56:19
—When thinking about diversity, we want children to find joy and comfort in diversity.
Anna Hartman
56:36
—Want to promote empathy. To come together and recognize the beauty in that we share and what is different.
Anna Hartman
57:15
—Need to reflect on how we can help children to have comfort and joy in exploring difference? What language will we give them?
Anna Hartman
58:54
—An example of ableism. We might share a book or a story. We need to help children see the effects of our ideas. How to have convo about difference by using a critical lens? Story of child in a wheelchair? Who is the center of the story? What are the messages about fixing, or identity? Focus on helping children seek out what is fair.
Rona Wolfe
59:27
Always ask yourself: Who writes the stories, who benefits from the stories, and who is missing from the stories.
Anna Hartman
59:34
—How to help children ask Qs to see who the story is about and why and how unfairness might hurt. Moving beyond acceptance.
Anna Hartman
59:40
—Want to offer chance to talk about bias.
Anna Hartman
59:56
—Want children to feel empowered to have agency, to stand up against injustice
Anna Hartman
01:00:22
—Let children walk and look around to be sure that the school is set up to be inclusive of everyone.
Anna Hartman
01:00:48
—Imp to focus on all of these goals.
Anna Hartman
01:01:28
—What is impt about anti-bias education is that it can apply to many age groups. This is meant for young children which demonstrates the importance of how we go through a parallel process as adults.
Anna Hartman
01:02:52
-What are our own identities? What is our own comfort with diversity? How have we absorbed stereotypes and breathed in the smog around us? How have we benefited or harmed? Getting to activism requires quite a bit of dialogue.
Anna Hartman
01:03:07
—Creating spaces and fostering cultures that support dialogue.
Anna Hartman
01:03:38
—How are we setting up ways for children to model courage?
Anna Hartman
01:03:57
—Q: Children learn prejudice from…
Dominique Viteretto
01:04:06
family environment, media
Celeste Finn
01:04:10
children learn prejudice from what they observe
Jasmine Nettrour
01:04:14
environment
Jasmine Nettrour
01:04:17
society
Karen Prince
01:04:22
The people around them
Vanessa SC
01:04:26
and books, too
Jasmine Nettrour
01:04:27
family, adults
Liz
01:04:28
adults, media
Jasmine Nettrour
01:04:32
media
Mary OBrien
01:04:34
Home beliefs/behaviors, community
Kyleigh Pharris
01:04:42
Children learn prejudice from their environment
Kate Oznick
01:04:47
As well as the silence of talking about diversity
Kate Oznick
01:04:59
I mean *not talking
Anna Hartman
01:05:03
—We are going to teach prejudice. That is why we need so much reflection in the process.
mary
01:05:12
Environment, families, socials
Anna Hartman
01:05:37
—The role of silence.
Gretchen
01:05:54
the way their family reacts to diversity. Also through media, toys (and I always think that when a child is given a toy, it is a direct reflection of a parents values)
Anna Hartman
01:06:51
—When we are silent or silencing we might signal that differences are wrong or bad; this denies a person identity and perpetuates systemic oppression and power.
Anna Hartman
01:07:10
—How do we interact with young children when they act questions?
Celeste Finn
01:07:32
Sushing can also lead to a since of shame. Children are seeing injustice and difference, so without a healthy discussion, children have to come up with answers on their own, and this is a breading ground for misconceptions.
Anna Hartman
01:07:44
—How to recognize and not shame the child and acknowledge that is important question and not give all the answers?
Anna Hartman
01:08:17
—Anti-bias is a framework for reconceptualizing our behavior—lens for viewing and assessing.
Anna Hartman
01:08:39
—In case you have trouble reading the poll: Q: What do you think will be the most challenging aspect of incorporating an anti-bias framework in your context? Or, what continues to be the most challenging aspects if you already apply an anti-bias lens to your practice?
Anna Hartman
01:09:05
Choices are:Feelings of disequilibrium or discomfort in this process as adults. Fears about inadvertently teaching prejudices or inaccurate language to describe differences and social identities.The amount of time and support involved in assessing, reflecting, and implementing this framework.Issues of adapting it within your specific school culture and community- concerns about buy-in from families and colleagues.
Anna Hartman
01:09:33
1. Feelings of disequilibrium or discomfort in this process as adults.
Anna Hartman
01:09:40
2. Fears about inadvertently teaching prejudices or inaccurate language to describe differences and social identities.
Anna Hartman
01:09:48
3. The amount of time and support involved in assessing, reflecting, and implementing this framework.
Anna Hartman
01:09:55
4. Issues of adapting it within your specific school culture and community- concerns about buy-in from families and colleagues.
Maria-Gabriela Bolanos
01:10:08
some schools do not realize how biased their centers are, for people of color like me it is really hard to advocate sometimes
Melissa Quinn
01:10:08
Thank you!
Anna Hartman
01:10:24
—We want to be courageous and risk takers and say, we need to revisit, I am trying to find the right words, because this is important.
Anna Hartman
01:11:14
—Maybe issues of adapting this in your communities. Families might be experiencing disequilibrium. Some might be eager and others voicing concern.
Christopher Stetson
01:11:40
I had to choose one, but all are in fact challenges.
Celeste Finn
01:12:02
This framework is new, so we have not experienced this in action, we don't know what it looks like- so it is very hard to invision and enact. We have also found that there are many different perspectives for how ABE can be taught and sometimes we get caught up in differences of approach.
Anna Hartman
01:12:35
—The fact that as educators who want to improve on this, good to recognize that this is necessary and that I need to learn. A good place to start. Going around my classroom to see how I am not perpetuating ideas I don’t wish to convey. How might we conduct an audit of our own classrooms?
Anna Hartman
01:13:10
—What might be barriers and moments of resistance? This is all data to know how to move forward. These challenges are real and they are hard. This gives us an idea of where we want to set our goals.
Anna Hartman
01:13:18
—Best way forward? Via intentionality.
Anna Hartman
01:13:25
—Maybe we set smaller goals.
Sonia Semana
01:13:40
I guess the importance is to start.
Anna Hartman
01:14:29
—Maybe should have a critical buddy? Engage in your own reflections on yourself. Making these areas focus or lens for your journaling or documentation.
Anna Hartman
01:14:54
—Maybe want to assess what is available or in the classroom, and how being used.
Anna Hartman
01:15:14
—We will share these resources out after the webinar, along with slide deck and recording and polls--
Anna Hartman
01:15:34
—Resources to help you take a first step.
Anna Hartman
01:15:53
—Books and materials for children’s play can be a place to start. As can an anti-bias position statement.
Anna Hartman
01:16:25
—Balance between teacher-initiatid and child-initiated entry points.
Anna Hartman
01:16:42
—Partnering with families.
Anna Hartman
01:17:10
—Back to the story of Maya telling Jack “You can’t be king!”:
Anna Hartman
01:18:55
—From a gender equity position, Maya can be whatever Maya wants to be. Ask Jack, Why? What is Maya is black? Maybe Jack is invoking a discourse of white privilege, encompassing intersectionality (race/gender)? Maybe ableness is related? Could be much happening here. I don’t want to shame Jack—want to hear what he is thinking and why to determine how to engage.
Anna Hartman
01:20:34
Welcoming Luisiana Meléndez, a clinical professor at Erikson Institute and director of the Institute’s Bilingual/ESL Certificate Program. Her teaching at Erikson focuses on the role of culture in child development and parenting and on the sociohistorical foundations of early childhood and bilingual education in the United States. In the last two years she has been working with Gateways to Opportunity, the Illinois statewide professional development support system, on developing competencies that will be included in a credential specifically designed for early childhood practitioners working with children growing up with more than one language. In addition to her work in early childhood teacher education and professional development, Dr. Meléndez has served in several workgroups and advisory boards convened around issues of bilingual and multilingual development and is currently a member of the Chicago Board of Education.
Anna Hartman
01:21:44
—Rscrch very clear that children aware very early of the ways others are different from them and from each others. BC children are meaning makers, they want to make sense of the world around them, they are trying ti understand the differences they see.
Anna Hartman
01:22:05
—silence diminishes.
Anna Hartman
01:23:01
—What if someone would say they are blind to another part of your identity? People would not like this. Nothing inherently wrong in being aware. What is unacceptable is contributing to negative stereotypes and more.
Anna Hartman
01:23:20
—How to take this energy of today to prepare for longevity—long-term implementation?
Anna Hartman
01:23:29
—How to take this and move forward so that it sticks?
Anna Hartman
01:23:58
—I think everyone is aware. This moment has made racism painfully visible to everyone. Issue is not new. But has become evident to many more ppl.
Anna Hartman
01:24:34
—Therefore important for educators to understand that efforts to combat this and other isms is a long term effort. Longstanding issues require longterm work.
Anna Hartman
01:25:41
—Bc our work encompasses values and beliefs, our schools are foundational. This is humbling work but surely welcome in our programs. Being aware of our power can serve to sustain our efforts, including the anti-bias framework.
Celeste Finn
01:26:30
do you know if there are materials to help teachers be critical buddies for each other?
Anna Hartman
01:26:38
—Find critical buddy or colleagues that are willing to engage with you in this opportunity from the beginning of school. Individuals willing to start making the change. Cannot put it off any more.
Celeste Finn
01:26:59
I am thinking of co-teachers, and how they can share feedback and ideas, without it feeling to raw, scary and painful to get critical feedback
Anna Hartman
01:27:10
—Q: How to recognize the expertise families bring to the table?
Anna Hartman
01:27:53
—Establishing true partnerships with families around any issue can be hard; may be hampered by invisible hierarchy.
Anna Hartman
01:28:10
—Recognizing that families have knowledge that is valuable and critical to this journey.
Anna Hartman
01:28:28
—Family expertise and point of view needs to be there, since children are part of families!
Anna Hartman
01:29:19
—Efforts to engage in this kind of work can be made harder by the fact that families may have a particular point of view about this kind of work. May be reluctant to have very young child to in a classroom or school where discussing differences and oppression and privilege in such a way.
Anna Hartman
01:29:49
—Looking at dual language learners:
Sonia Semana
01:31:24
Where do I find that research :)
Anna Hartman
01:31:34
—Children’s identity comes from many factors. I ask students to think about a memory that they have of closeness or intimacy with a caring person in their lives. And then we talk about role of language in that memory. Usually salient. Language is perceived prenatally. When they are born, has been shown that children prefer the languages they heard in utero. Language is very important part of identity.
Gretchen
01:31:40
Side question--will we receive training certificates for attending this webinar?
Janet Sear
01:32:06
How does that affect babies that are adopted outside of their mother's birth language?
Sonia Semana
01:32:38
Janet that is a good question.
Anna Hartman
01:32:45
—Lang plays huge role in socialization. In communicating values. In the things families want the children to have. Therefore v impt (because of preference and identity); being exposed to more than one language has many benefits. And yet a misconception atet if you speak more than one language to a young child they will get confused or have a language delay.
Amber Lowe
01:33:01
Yes. We will send certificates of participation via Eventbrite.
Anna Hartman
01:33:16
—Children are capable of leaning two languages from the beginning.
Gretchen
01:33:23
Thank you!
Anna Hartman
01:34:22
—Oftentimes invisible social hierarchy (English as language in the mainstream)—children speaking another languages may inadvertently be seen to be at risk. If their language is not represented in school, this communicates to them that the other language is not as impt or as valuable.
Anna Hartman
01:35:00
—Question: What are our blindspots?
Anna Hartman
01:35:30
—One of the blindspots may be a reluctance to be critically reflective about our own biases and beliefs.
Anna Hartman
01:36:10
—Examining the attitudes that may color our thoughts is not easy and must be a long-term process.
Anna Hartman
01:36:44
—Back to issue of families and how to engage them: Because fams bring own biases and beliefs, there can be a lot of tension in this shared educational project.
Anna Hartman
01:37:54
—When this tensions come up, oftentimes we tend to see that as an opportunity to make their voices and positions be heard and validated. When there is tension between what a family or educator wants, the educator holds the onus of engaging in a true dialogue, listening to the family. Communicating that you value their point of view (even if you don’t agree). A very hard thing to do.
Anna Hartman
01:38:48
—Humans tend to approach those circumstances as opportunity to affirm; impt to find opportunities for true dialogue. Imp to find best time of day! Without dismissing when a parent brings it up.
Anna Hartman
01:39:08
—Authentic effort to listen opens opportunity for changes and for meeting somewhere.
Anna Hartman
01:39:51
—Key: Inviting families! To book reading or activity around this topic and inviting them to ask questions. More time and effort but that kind of approach is more likely to generate true partnership and therefore moving forward with anti-bias educational work.
Anna Hartman
01:40:33
—Q: Implications of culture on child-rearing and development
Anna Hartman
01:40:43
—Everything is related to culture!
Anna Hartman
01:40:58
—Yes there are universal goals that families share for their children.
Christopher Stetson
01:41:34
For the time being, we will not be able to have conversations or any meaningful contact with families.
Anna Hartman
01:41:42
—Goals will also vary across and within cultures.
Anna Hartman
01:44:15
—Q: So overwhelming to start the journey now with COVID-19
Anna Hartman
01:44:40
—This COVID crisis has made it more clear how necessary this is. But surely overwhelming is an understatement!
Anna Hartman
01:44:50
—May be pop for reflection, new alliances, small steps.
Anna Hartman
01:45:05
—Without losing sight of the ultimate goal.
Anna Hartman
01:45:27
—“Step by step, you go far.”
Anna Hartman
01:47:24
—Especially in this time, one of my hopes is that the energy I have seen and heard in thinking about how we switched to remote learning and how we thought about families and our assumptions. I think this did bring some new things to our attention. There is more about families that I didn’t know before. This is exciting opportunity to think about how to be innovative and creative. SO much to think about right now and yet this is fertile ground for innovation.
Anna Hartman
01:47:31
—EC educators are innovators.
Anna Hartman
01:48:25
—Q: How do you weave diversity education in an early childhood curriculum without offending parents and appearing as though you are forcing topics onto their children that they may not want addressed with their children?
Anna Hartman
01:48:44
—Making sense of the context is key.
Anna Hartman
01:49:11
—Just as in other ways we think about communicating with families, we want to be open with families. Give time for that.
Anna Hartman
01:49:37
—Time to be explicit about goals. We operate within the context of the mission of the school. Families not always aware of the mission of the school.
Anna Hartman
01:50:35
—Slow process. Reflection process and thinking about allies and entrypoints is wise. The process can take a long time. In what ways can we start? Can take a long time? Not something going to jump in with!
Robyn-Lee Rabin
01:51:22
Thank you! excellent presentation
Anna Caplan
01:51:23
Thank you!
Dominique Viteretto
01:51:29
Thank You!!!