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Israeli Literature - Shared screen with speaker view
Deb Solo
03:56
Leah please mute your sound and video
Deb Solo
04:59
and Joan Florsheim please. when you don’t mute it affects the sound for everyone else
Deb Solo
08:36
if you touch your screen your can enlarge it
Deb Solo
12:21
please please mute
Linda Henry Goodman
17:29
This is included in the Reform liturgy for Yizkor.
Solange Tajchman
18:02
Such a beautiful poem - I used in in my Hesped for my mother, z”l
Zalman Spivack
18:50
For those that were with us yesterday, Agnon and Zelda are both buried on Har Hazaytim. I great tour, down Mt Olives
robertakalmanson
21:00
MUTE yourselves
Susie Goldsmith
21:32
Leah Liquornik---Mute!
Me Barenholtz
22:26
There was an echo. Everyone MUST be MUTED
Linda Henry Goodman
23:49
I often have used this midrash for baby namings.
Kitty Hoffman
25:49
The hebrew poem hs a very interesting structure visually
Susan Mayer
26:24
I was startled to hear and read the original Hebrew and realize that due to the limitations of the language it talks about "men," as opposed to the wonderful translation which is universal. This is my first exposure to this poem, and I am glad I read the translation FIRST.
Heather Silverman
27:08
My first tee?ime meeting this poem. How is that possib
Lawrence Kaplan
27:28
Why change in translaltion form third person singular
Lawrence Kaplan
27:56
to first person plural
DebK
29:02
Bnai Adam is a human
Me Barenholtz
29:12
Chutzpa!
Tova Shimon
29:16
Adam is Man
Sorel Reisman
29:30
great comment about the 'male'.
Tova Shimon
29:42
Ish=Isha with the addition of G-d
A Ginsburg
29:50
There are now major academic efforts to remove the gendering of Hebrew. University of Colorado and others are working on this.
Solange Tajchman
30:31
We need to remember that Hebrew is a gendered language and that in the 1970s this was common usage for “people”
Susan Mayer
31:57
Well, what does that say about society at that time if men = people . We can do better than that; we can be better than that.
Susan Mayer
32:22
Yes, it is my first encounter
Susan Mayer
32:43
, spoken as a poorly educated North American Jew.
Me Barenholtz
32:54
Ditto!
Randi Brenowitz
33:25
we can do better in English now. however, given the Hebrew and the times, this is how it was written. not up to us to change it. new poets can write for these times and these sensibilities
Lawrence Kaplan
33:25
You can translate it as "Each person" and alternate "given to him" with "given to her."
Susan Mayer
33:33
You (WE) should be commended on continuing to learn -- not on what we didn't learn earlier.
Mitchel Slomiak
33:43
Our rabbi emeritus translates “Adam” as “earthling,” which I believe is a good move on the gendering issue.
Solange Tajchman
34:18
As someone who was brought up in a gendered language, French, I think that it is important to realise that the use of man, as humankind, has been much more difficult to navigate in terms of changing to a more universal language. Allusion to Biblical text in Hebrew also complicates this process
Susan Mayer
35:21
Similar "de-gendering" is going on in South American Spanish. It takes a long time, but use of the "male" as normal is a terrible handicap to a language.
Kitty Hoffman
36:16
Many languages are gendered, and the male has been used as the ‘universal’…it is a deep challenge for updating thinking, as we are so conditioned by the languages we use, and it forms our mental constructs
Frona Kahn
37:04
love
Deborah
37:22
Most languages are gendered - -where verbs and adjectives are connected to the "gender" of the noun. To "ungender" language will affect all literature.
Kitty Hoffman
38:07
And now there is an emerging awareness of some of the problematic characteristics of binary thinking in general
Me Barenholtz
38:08
It will ruin all literature.
Kitty Hoffman
38:43
Literature that already exists stays as it is…new creators will do new work
Paula J
38:54
There is a Jewish non-binary project.
Susan Shevitz
38:55
It was used as the structure for a beautiful eulogy for Ed Frim z”l , a Jewish educator who passed away a week ago today. He had worked in Toledo, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee and just begun has head of school at MetroWest Jewish Day School in the Boston area.
Kitty Hoffman
39:04
thought, and literature, evolves
Susan Shevitz
39:40
I was referring to the poem
Susan Mayer
47:46
Is this page "Vilna" an excerpt from a book? What is the book's title? I came late, sorry.
Cathy Felix
48:14
Tales of Love and Darkness
Erica Sokoloff
48:15
A Tale of Light and Darkness
Kitty Hoffman
48:18
A Tale of Love and Darkness
Me Barenholtz
48:27
A Tale of Love and Darkness
Erica Sokoloff
48:37
Sorry Love not Light
Susan Mayer
49:41
Thank you.
Susan Axe-Bronk
01:00:34
I hear Woody Allen in this :-)
Batya Fonda
01:00:49
This sounds very modern!!
Solange Tajchman
01:01:21
WOW!
Solange Tajchman
01:02:27
how wonderful to have this dilemma about universalism vs. zionism focused on the purchase of cheese!
Mitchel Slomiak
01:03:31
Yes, brilliant. And, oh so familiar to those of us concerned with environmental sustainability, social justice, or other causes. So easy to see manifestations in our mundane day-to-day choices.
Frona Kahn
01:03:33
fascinating and rich session. toda
Mitchel Slomiak
01:03:45
Todah Rachel!
ahmw
01:04:05
Todah as always
Sarah Schachter
01:04:47
Thank you!!
Phyllis Steiner
01:04:50
תודה רבה
Rhea Dorn
01:04:50
Thank you for enlarging my reading Amos Oz.
Aviva Lev-Ari
01:04:57
GREAT selections and multimedia the voice of Zelda was amazing to listen to. Many thanks, Aviva Lev-Ari
Susan Mayer
01:04:59
Wonderful class. Thank you.
Susan Axe-Bronk
01:05:00
thanks!!
Jackie Ellenson
01:05:08
Marcia Falk has done brilliant translations of Zelda’s work, The Spectacular Difference,,
Jackie Ellenson
01:05:33
possibly this is the English translation we just used.
iPad (5)
01:05:40
an amazing class
Geula Hebron
01:05:41
Thank You!!!
Joni Schockett
01:05:46
thanks. wonderful class. how do I get on the email list?
Solange Tajchman
01:05:46
Thank you, Rachel. I love the opportunity to delve deeply into text that we usually read straightforwardly!
Joan Florsheim
01:05:56
Hi Jackie Ellenson. How are you and David??
Heather Silverman
01:06:02
I don’t feel the tenderness of the language is an obstacle. It’s so easy to understand that Adam means person - not male person
Steven Broder
01:06:21
The philosophy of cheese purchase. Who knew?! Todah, Rachel.
Heather Silverman
01:06:27
Genderdness not tendeerness
Michael Kaftor
01:06:45
That was the time of -- America First, and of Israel First.
Varda Farber
01:07:14
I totally get the internal debate
Susan Mayer
01:07:39
Oz's dilemmas about what to buy echo my own throughout my life -- starting with not buying German made items right up to today, in trying not to buy from amazon because of their wasteful packaging and how they treat their workers. In between -- lots of other value-laden buying decisions.
Varda Farber
01:08:10
Yes, susan, me too.
Joni Schockett
01:09:53
I think the internal debate about the cheese is a symbol if the broader internal debate in early Israel about our relationship to those Arabs who already lived there. perhaps there was an early desire to connect more with neighbors or, at least, to understand, empathize with people struggling to tame the land.
stanleykay
01:10:07
Same as my parents wouldn’t get a VW bug because German. don’t know when my father got his giant Mercedes, maybe when driven by guide in Israel?
Daniel Cohen
01:10:12
Thé values enunciated by Oz surprised me. it evokes nationalism and division, which is why I am not a pure Zionist. I realize it was written before 1948, but it has persisted beyond Independence.
Susan Mayer
01:11:01
This constant internal debate definitely derives from the tradition of arguing every minute point of existence (and Torah). How do other people live their simple lives without thinking about all this? And after a lifetime of making the "best" decision, what have I accomplished? Maybe I should try removing this huge weight from my shoulders.
Heather Silverman
01:12:28
No, don’t do thiat! It’s what gives weight and depth to your thoughts. It’s our tradition and to be proud of!!
Joni Schockett
01:16:56
my father would never buy anything made in Germany. he made me promise never to buy a German car. He even hated Bayer aspirin. He was in the army during the war. it framed his whole life, perhaps as the early years in Israel framed the lives of so many in Israel and in the diaspora. we wrote what we know. Oz’s writing reflects his experience in Israel and also what he heard about his family history. Fiction can teach us so much of people, culture, society, and more, often what we wish we could be as much as what we really are. The readers bring their own experience to the words and interpret as they can. As one born after Israel was established, I read this as much for the history as for a glimpse into the human condition of the time and what molded that/ those particular sensibilities.
stanleykay
01:17:07
Susan Mayer- definitely understand you!
Kitty Hoffman
01:23:28
yes. Which us why there was so much ‘European’ high culture in the early isrel
Varda Farber
01:27:05
Thank you for another thoughtful nuanced conversation.
Peter Bronk
01:27:15
We had similar feelings about Germany until a cultural trip to Berlin in 2011.