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Israeli Literature - Shared screen with speaker view
Susan Shevitz
37:09
How do you raise your hand in zoom? Not the thumbs up but to show you want to speak?
Frona Kahn
37:29
go to participants list. there is an option there
Erica Sokoloff
38:03
Bottom right of participants list
DEBRA GLAZER
45:23
My cousin's wedding took place on the Haas Promenade a few years ago. Gorgeous view of Old City.
Lawrence Kaplan
46:53
For davening early on Shavuot morning I much prefer the Tayelet (he Promenade) to the Kotel.
Linda Henry Goodman
50:31
Ha Ha - Rachel knows rabbis well. We all love her!!
lauren shachar
55:13
Oh, just WOW. What an innovative translation.
Frona Kahn
55:33
yep
Lawrence Kaplan
56:15
That is absolutely brilliant--on the part of Amichai in finding the equivalent and Rachel in recognizing it.
Erica Sokoloff
57:21
I believe that it may have been the translator, whose name I missed, who made the culturally relevant translation.
Lawrence Kaplan
57:43
Channah Bloch
Erica Sokoloff
57:57
Todah
Lawrence Kaplan
58:59
Have to checl to what extent Bloch consulted with Amichai
Erica Sokoloff
59:40
They worked together? Interesting
Kitty Hoffman
01:00:26
Most poets work with their translators — if they know the language.
Lawrence Kaplan
01:00:41
Not sure. But authors and translators often work closely together.
Lawrence Kaplan
01:01:01
Kitty. See you made the point already
Erica Sokoloff
01:01:12
:)
Judy Hollander
01:01:42
What do Jeruslam people say?
Jon Tepper
01:03:58
I have many friends who live in J'lem. WHen I visit them, our discussion is focused on the usual quotidiam=n matters. Maybe they wake up or have a flash of wonder that thewy are living in 'Ir HaKodesh'
Judy Hollander
01:04:27
Move to Mea Sherim he would say
Jon Tepper
01:04:28
...at occasional times of the day or the week, but I've never discussed this with them.
Jon Tepper
01:07:14
Ironically, I have hed a similar discussion with relatives, who grew up and still live in the hills above Firenze, Italia, as to whether they wake up at times and up with a sense of being blessed with the panorama they see out their window every morning and eveniing.
Adam Wishkovsky
01:08:08
On and Off easily
Judy Hollander
01:08:52
bandage
Ruth Kaplan
01:09:52
Which verb is used for wearing a mask?
Nachama/Chumi Kanner
01:11:09
la’atotלעטות
Nachama/Chumi Kanner
01:11:45
but also לחבוש
Ed Grossman
01:13:32
pnei also has a sense of essence or presence (esp. with reference to God).
lauren shachar
01:14:03
thank you Ed Grossman. that's a great insight.
Daniel's iPad
01:21:20
maybe in a previous life
Suzanne Levin
01:21:26
🖖
lauren shachar
01:27:45
there are so many photographs of bells in Jerusalem in this poetry book of Amichai .
Kitty Hoffman
01:29:44
Rachel — thank you for highlighting the difference between the Hebrew and English in that last line — given my languages and most familiar literary traditions, it reads obviously as a Christian reference and I had wondered…
lauren shachar
01:30:22
classic version by Yehoram Gaon.
Jon Tepper
01:31:07
You are noting the bell towers = classic element of church architecture? I immediately think of the Dormition Abbey, the highest point on one's view of Har Tziyon.
Erica Sokoloff
01:31:07
The religion major in me immediately thought the same thing
Gail's iphone4105043416
01:31:43
we sang this at camp Ramah in the 1960s
Tom Kraner
01:33:15
Gail, make sure you sing it on Sunday. Tom
Jon Tepper
01:33:46
Yes, a standard at Ramah Berkshires in the mid-60s, especially on Tisha B'Av.
Mj Levison
01:34:10
when was it written?
Joyce Bohnen
01:34:25
Yehoram Gaon did not compose the melody. He is singing it
lauren shachar
01:35:58
Yes i'm sorry for the misunderstanding. Yehoram Gaon is strongly identified with this song, because of this rendition which we just heard.
Deborah
01:38:07
http://www.art.huji.ac.il/art_img/art_galleries/founders_painting_-_photo_by_d_guthrie_0.jpg
Judy Hollander
01:42:21
amichai last line?
Erica Sokoloff
01:43:28
So interesting that these 2 secular poets both reference the messiah
Lawrence Kaplan
01:43:51
This analysis is great.
Kitty Hoffman
01:44:22
yes it is. wonderful.
monafishbane
01:45:03
I agree. This teaching is amazing. Deep, insightful
Linda Henry Goodman
01:48:35
Just also to refer to Zelda's Poem, "Everyone Has A Name."
lauren shachar
01:49:16
what do you mean, Linda?
Linda Henry Goodman
01:50:18
Each of us has a name, given by the mountains, and given by our walls, given by the stars, and given by our neighbors, etc.....
Leah Golberstein
01:51:31
Thank you very much!
Rhea Dorn
01:51:32
Wonderful.
Ruth Kaplan
01:51:36
Beautiful!!
Linda Henry Goodman
01:51:47
Thank you Rachel, the sponsors, and everyone else who has studied together today.
C tannen
01:51:56
thank you Rachel Stuart and sponsors
Geula Hebron
01:52:17
so wonderful.
lauren shachar
01:52:21
wonderful new insights to Amicai.
Rosemary Linsider
01:52:32
Such a wonderful and deep reading of the poems! Thank you!
Harriet Wolpoff
01:53:07
Thank you as always!
Jon Tepper
01:55:06
I love Rachel's style, to unearth so much meaning from a poem...how wonderful that we're all invited to participate in a literary archaeological dig!
Erica Sokoloff
01:56:18
What a great phrase “literary archeological dig”:). You are so en pointe
Jon Tepper
01:57:09
Todah Rabbah for your kind words, Erica.
Lawrence Kaplan
02:03:41
Thank you for your fascinating analysis of the Bowdlerization of Me'al Pisgat
Lawrence Kaplan
02:05:01
I'll stick with the old tume1!
Lawrence Kaplan
02:06:47
I met Miriam Niger Fleischman on a café on Derekh Beit Lehem!
Kitty Hoffman
02:06:51
The Betari in Poland/Ukraine were very insistent on learning good Hebrew.
Lila Korn
02:08:49
Thank you! I have to go. This was terrific.
Sue Melmed
02:10:42
Thank you for your always insightful and stimulating lessons.
Aviva Lev-Ari
02:15:57
LOVE THIS CLASS, Aviva Lev-Ari