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Leadership in the Wilderness - Shared screen with speaker view
Anna Hartman
25:19
Welcome!
Janet Sear
25:38
Janet Sear Board of Jewish Education Chicago
Brenda Footer
25:49
Brenda from Bender JCC in greater DC
Sasha Kopp
25:56
Sasha Kopp, The Jewish Education Project, NY - So excited for the presentation today!
Karen Faust
25:58
Karen Milwaukee
Lemor Balter
25:58
Lemor Balter, My Little School, NYC
Nancy Goldberg
26:02
Nancy...Bnai Israel...Rockville, MD
Amy Miller
26:03
Amy Miller, Larchmont Temple Nursery School
Howard Eisenberg
26:08
Alyse Eisenberg-Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas
Michelle Gold
26:12
Michelle Gold, Goldsmith Early Childhood Center
Robin Cohen
26:22
Robin Cohen, Beth Emeth Early Childhood Center
Shani Wilkes
26:24
Shani Wilkes, Combined Jewish Philanthropies (Boston)
Abby Aloni
26:39
Abby Aloni from Bernard Zell Anshe Emet Day School, Chicago
Liz
26:51
Liz Sherman BJE Wilmette IL
Veronica Maravankin
26:54
Hi. Veronica Maravankin. Florida
Karen Faust
27:23
Karen Faust JCC Milwaukee
Scott Aaron
27:34
Scott Aaron, JUF Chicago
Anna Hartman
27:47
—Friendly notetaker Anna Hartman (Chicago) here.
Rachel Raz
27:56
Rachel Raz, Boston
Oak Park Temple
27:58
Marci Sperling Flynn, Glasser Preschool of Oak Park Temple, Oak Park, IL
Anna Hartman
28:10
—Arielle Levites welcomes us, introduces the work.
Anna Hartman
28:23
—HQ early care is essential infrastructure!
Anna Hartman
28:31
—Essential for the Jewish community as well.
Denise Moyes Schnur
28:37
Denise Moyes-Schnur Jewish Community Federation, San Francisco
Max Handelman
28:48
So excited to hear this research! Max Handelman, Anshe Emet Synagogue in Chicago
Anna Hartman
29:57
—How Jewish ECE can create entry point and sometimes even amplifier for connection to Jewish meaning and community
Anna Hartman
30:26
—Researchers at Child Trends. Child Trends is the nation’s leading nonprofit research organization focused exclusively on improving the lives and prospects of children, youth, and their families.
Brenda Footer
30:43
Hi Tam! So nice our paths are crossing here
Anna Hartman
30:49
—Mark Rosen. Mark Rosen is an Associate Professor in the Hornstein Jewish Professional Leadership Program at Brandeis University. Mark has been doing research on Jewish families with young children and Jewish early childhood for the past 15 years.
Lawrence Bier
30:54
Hi Everyone- Mara Bier- excited for this presentation.
Anna Hartman
31:26
-At Child Trends, Dr. Tamara Halle was co-Principle Investigator on this study. She is a Senior Scholar in the Early Childhood Development content area at Child Trends.
Tamara Halle
31:42
So happy to have other members of our CASJE ECE Project Team join from near and far! Hi, Monica Arkin and Mara Bier!
Anna Hartman
32:06
—Is study greater, or action? The rabbis conclude: "Study is greater, for it leads to action." We could also perhaps read it as: Study is greater when or if it leads to action. That’s our intention here today.
Anna Hartman
33:09
—Mark begins. Many documents, hundreds of pages! Must-year study. Have been distilling, and here we are!
Anna Hartman
33:12
—casje.org
Anna Hartman
33:36
—There you can find all of the documents. Such as exec summary and final report. Goes into interesting issues and findings we won’t all get to today.
Anna Hartman
33:44
—How to summarize?
Anna Hartman
33:55
—Three really basic Qs we attempted to answer.
Anna Hartman
34:26
—1. Jewish engagement as a concept. We toss around this concept, but what does it actually mean—to families and to professionals? Definition and measurement to answer.
Anna Hartman
34:54
—2. How programs engage families. The Q tried to answer is how DO Jewish ECE programs engage families with young children; and what might barriers be?
Anna Hartman
35:31
—3. Looked at families. Tried to answer: How does Jewish engagement change over time for Jewish families with young children? How differ from families not at Jewish ECE programs?
Anna Hartman
36:10
—Needed data to answer these. Thus went into depth in three communities. Chicago, Washington, D.C., Seattle. Each chosen for a reason.
Anna Hartman
36:22
—Spoiler alert:
Anna Hartman
36:31
—Main findings here on screen.
Anna Hartman
36:57
—1. What is Jewish engagement? A: It is multidimensional! Aspects that thad not yet been looked at systematically.
Anna Hartman
37:35
2. Second finding is there are some structural barriers to choosing these programs—these reflect needs of parents. Parents need convenience, meets schedules, can afford. These are barriers for some parents.
Anna Hartman
38:09
3. Clear to us that ECE is essential to the economy. So clear to us all today.
Anna Hartman
38:39
4. Jewish ECE is linked with increased levels of Jewish family engagement. Yes. A fam that enrolls does show increased levels of Jewish engagement.
Anna Hartman
39:29
5. Major windows of opportunity for engaging families: birth of first child; enrolling first child in Jewish ECE. Those windows are important and we want to be there and help parents make those decisions.
Anna Hartman
39:52
—Dr. Tamara Halle with Child Trends.
Anna Hartman
40:51
—Regarding this first research question (what does Jewish education Mean). Did lit. Review of literature on Jewish engagement, with focus on families with young children.
Anna Hartman
41:06
—Looking at broader literature but focusing in.
Anna Hartman
41:19
—This lit review is up on CASJE site
Anna Hartman
41:58
—Reviewed previous surveys to see how Jewish engagement been looked at in the past. To see how defined. Specific interest in fans with young children.
Anna Hartman
42:33
—Also key informant interviews with Jewish EC professionals, Jewish engagement researchers, funders, practitioners, parents.
Anna Hartman
42:52
—Thus developed definitions and measurement.
Anna Hartman
43:12
—Specific aspects of engagement seem to be especially salient for families with young children
Anna Hartman
44:05
—Jewish engagement can change over time. For this segment of the population, the key windows of opportunity for increasing Jewish engagement: Birth of a first child, entry into early care and education for any of the children.
Anna Hartman
44:53
—Another finding: most impt engagement approach for fans with young children is one that is relational. From professionals and among other families who are in same life position/trajectory as a family. This a way to engage families.
Anna Hartman
45:14
—Some of the dimensions of Jewish engagement that are impt for fans with young children:
Anna Hartman
45:52
—Three main components: behaviors, attitudes/values, institutional attachment. For many, indicator of engagement is becoming a member of some kind of Jewish org.
Anna Hartman
46:29
—Through the lit review and interviews (and somewhat from survey) we found particular aspects salient and impt when trying to define J engagement among fans with young children.
Anna Hartman
47:07
—Home practice:Engaging young children with Jewish practices or activities with Jewish content, such as songs and books with Hebrew or Jewish themes/language, Friday night dinner
Anna Hartman
47:12
—Connection/Interaction
Anna Hartman
48:04
—Educational choices parents make for children is an indication of engagement—choosing to send child to parent and me class, for example, is an indicator of engagement among these fams. As well as choosing Jewish ECE program.
Anna Hartman
48:36
—Finding meaning in one’s life through Jewish practice or diff. kinds of aspects of Jewish behaviors and attitudes is impt piece of meaning among families with young children.
Anna Hartman
50:02
—Changes over time in Jewish engagement. Heard loud and clear that two particular windows of opportunity for elevating engagement: Birth of first child and entrance into ECE. We had hypothesizes this and thus in the case studies we built in next part of our methodology we were able to search for and find this.
Anna Hartman
50:26
—Next up: Ilana Huz. Senior Research Analyst in the Parenting and Family Dynamics content area at Child Trends’ and the project’s graduate intern.
Anna Hartman
50:58
—Research Q 2: How do Jewish ECE programs engage families and what are barriers to engagement?
Anna Hartman
51:34
—1. Jewish ECE programs see main role as educating children and families about Judaism’s practices and encouraging finding meaning in Jewish life.
Anna Hartman
52:04
—Programs also offer opps for families to build relationships and connections with one another, creating community.
Anna Hartman
52:34
—Impt barriers to enrollment in Jewish ECE. Notably, prioritizing relationship-based engagement can help enroll and keep engaged.
Anna Hartman
53:13
—Jewish ECE programs are ambivalent about goal of increasing home practices—but do provide many opportunities for this. Don’t want to push or alienate.
Anna Hartman
53:53
—Jewish ECE programs are invested in engaging families in the host institutions, with area for growth being promoting attachment in Jewish community writ large
Anna Hartman
54:26
—Barriers: Cost, hours, location; we heard a lot about programs trying to increase hours.
Anna Hartman
54:44
—Didn’t hear a lot about programs for children with special needs
ellendietrick
54:53
Does anyone on this call work in a program that offers a comprehensive program for children with special needs?
Anna Hartman
55:04
—Closes on Jewish holidays is a barrier.
Anna Hartman
56:00
—Dr. Elizabeth (Liz) Karberg is a Senior Research Scientist in the Parenting and Family Dynamics content area at Child Trends. Liz oversaw the survey development, launch, and analyses for this project.
Anna Hartman
57:16
—Question 3: How do beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors around Jewish engagement change over time? How/if do patterns differ for children not in Jewish ECE? Online Survey to answer this. From those three communities and more.
Anna Hartman
58:01
—Families with high engagement prior to birth of first child were more likely to choose Jewish ece rather than non-jewish ece
Anna Hartman
58:36
—Blue is those who chose Jewish ECE
Anna Hartman
58:44
—Other ECE noted in orange
Anna Hartman
59:38
—Parents who chose other ECE were more likely to report these various factors as important. This aligned with previous studies. Quality of care, location, hours of care, cost
Anna Hartman
59:59
—Those who chose Jewish rated more impt warmth of staff and other priorities.
Anna Hartman
01:00:29
—Examined families Jewish engagement by what they chose for schools. More families with children in Jewish ECE report higher levels of engagement (unsurprising).
Anna Hartman
01:02:19
—Asked if engagement changed while a family in Jewish ECE. Four aspects of engagement that 71% or more said they changed are: more a part of jewish community and more a part of local Jewish community, more friends who are jewish, built a jewish tradition in home or family.
Anna Hartman
01:02:45
—Some interesting community-specific findings. Chicago and DC were similar,
Anna Hartman
01:03:43
—Chicago: fewer Chicago families were interested in certain areas of engagement relative to those in Seattle. Maybe because families are already established in Jewish life than in Seattle. Could mean Jewish ECE enrollment is an indicator rather than catalyst for Jewish engagement.
Anna Hartman
01:04:32
—In Seattle, less established community, seeing families increase engagement in practices at home. Could be bellwether for other communities that are less established Jewishly.
Anna Hartman
01:05:39
—Regarding the question of “Does Jewish ECE change family’s engagement.” Are the changes we’re see related to number of hours a family attends Jewish ECE? No. But number of months attending makes a difference.
Anna Hartman
01:06:08
—Enrollment in Jewish ECE as window of opportunity for engagement. Can be an accelerant, especially in first 6-12 months of enrollment.
Anna Hartman
01:06:40
—Jewish ECE as a gateway. More likely to send children to other Jewish programming in future years. Less likely to send to public or charter schools.
Anna Hartman
01:07:07
—Jewish ECE associated with Jewish engagement—these are descriptive finds and not causal as a finding.
Anna Hartman
01:07:41
—To reiterate: In general, Jewish ECE increases engagement. Data in multiple data sets bears this out.
Anna Hartman
01:08:06
—The big change happens if/when families were already Jewishly engaged before birth of a child.
Anna Hartman
01:08:58
—Found that Jewish ECE has an effect on Jewish engagement if baseline levels are already high. Those families who expressed engagement in limited ways before birth of a child did not experience big growth across the board.
Anna Hartman
01:09:51
—Other levers for Jewish engagement: Birth of a first child. Increases in domains where already engaged. Lever for changing degree of engagement.
Anna Hartman
01:10:34
—Jewish ECE has potential to change the ways that families engage more than any other lever.
Anna Hartman
01:11:50
—Implications for ECE staff:
Anna Hartman
01:12:54
—Parents have varying needs and competing demands.
Anna Hartman
01:13:04
—Parents want to join in Jewish celebrations and learning.
Anna Hartman
01:13:17
—What will all this mean in COVID-19 area? What opportunities are there?
Anna Hartman
01:13:52
—ECE quality is about quality of curriculum AND engagement. Parents want to be involved in the community. How to reimagine these opportunities creatively in our current era?
Anna Hartman
01:14:15
—For example, modified programming on Jewish holidays since these closures are barriers to enrollment.
Anna Hartman
01:14:31
—How to tighten quality via PD?
Anna Hartman
01:15:01
—From funding and policy and planning point of view: Jewish ECE has the promise to engage families Jewishly, but they must be enrolled to make that happen!
Anna Hartman
01:15:30
—How can we strengthen enrollment? Programs must be successful, which require string staff. Low salaries are a barrier. Need to focus on competitive salaries!
Anna Hartman
01:15:39
—*strong
Anna Hartman
01:15:56
—More funding for professional development for teachers and directors
Anna Hartman
01:17:04
—Statewide quality improvement initiatives (known commonly as QRIS). When programs participate they may get on 4th radar of more families and into community with other schools in ECE.
Anna Hartman
01:17:18
—How better to support and expand disability inclusion?
Anna Hartman
01:19:05
—Implications for future research. 1. We need more and better data at local, state and national levels—around Jewish ECE workforce and families with young Jewish children. We relied on data from these three cities with their Federations and PJ Library lists. There can be survey fatigue and don’t want to risk overuse. Need to think about how to build additional data sources at multiple levels to heighten our understanding of how to engage families and support ECE workforce.
Anna Hartman
01:20:26
—Need further conceptual work around this new multidimensional model for engagement. To expand the model to expand on items Mark just discussed. As well as some of the PD supports provided for staff and compensation packages. Getting policy and practices constructs into what supports parents’ choices for and experience with Jewish ECe will be key.
Anna Hartman
01:21:07
—Future research could study questions earlier on, as many of ours were retrospective.
Anna Hartman
01:21:57
—More longitudinal designs have drawbacks and benefits.
Anna Hartman
01:22:33
—Will need continued Federation partnerships
Anna Hartman
01:23:27
—More research should come in the future on communities with large proportions of unaffiliated or interfaith. As we found with Seattle. To understand role of Jewish ECE on Jewish engagement.
Anna Hartman
01:23:41
—To disaggregate data by location, will need bigger data sets.
Anna Hartman
01:24:03
—More research on the role of Jewish engagement programming on ECE choice.
Anna Hartman
01:25:00
—Need observational measures of Jewish ECE quality that reflects the indicators that are prevalent in Jewish ECE programs
Anna Hartman
01:25:11
—Would love to see more measurement work!
Anna Hartman
01:26:00
—Questions? Add to Q&A box.
Anna Hartman
01:26:30
—Ilana hired as scholar fellow in this project—Anna says, now that is a great way to support future research in the field!
Lawrence Bier
01:34:57
We can take a page from Reggio Emilia where every child with a special need ( that they call a child with special rights) is provided a one on one trained facilitator to be with them throughout their ECE education.
Anna Hartman
01:36:17
—Link to breakouts now: https://bit.ly/breakout613
Ilana Huz
01:36:22
Thank you for all of your questions! There are many great questions that we were unable to answers due to time constraints. Please e-mail any members of the research team with any questions.
Anna Hartman
01:36:32
—Full study at casje.org
Tamara Halle
01:36:42
I forgot to say thanks and hello to Heidi Schwartz and Maya Cook - members of our CASJE ECE Team!
Ilana Huz
01:36:44
thalle@childtrends.orgmirosen@brandeis.eduekarberg@childtrends.orgihuz@childtrends.org
Marlyn Bloch Jaffe
01:36:45
How can we get more info about the July 9 session for policy and planning people?
Anna Hartman
01:37:06
—@Marlyn, you can email me anna@jparadigm.org
Anna Hartman
01:37:21
-Recording and notes on jparadigm.org