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PUB April Member Meeting - Shared screen with speaker view
brianfackler
13:55
What are thoughts on Walt Wright’s Checkerboard of honey hives for swarm prevention
Dewey Caron
14:32
good management options for slowing swarming.
Andrew Bray (he/him)
17:46
Thanks Mandy!
Andrew Bray (he/him)
24:25
Good to see you Glen :)
Dione.Fugere@mercer.com
26:01
Stop sharing and then reshare
Andrew Bray (he/him)
28:38
Worst case scenario, hit escape to get out of full screen mode, Glen
Andrew Bray (he/him)
32:09
Schroedinger’s Queen
Ryan McDonnough
32:14
Hah! Schroedinger’s Hive?
Ryan McDonnough
33:02
:)
Ryan McDonnough
55:42
Interesting. I am wrangling a colony that is building swarm cells. Was doing some intervention yesterday and, when I was sequestering the queen, I heard/saw her piping
Terry's iPhone
58:40
A queen must lose weight in order to swarm. Please elaborate
Andrew Bray (he/him)
59:30
Someone could probably go into better detail than me, but the short of it is that she must lose weight in order to succeed in flying with the rest of the swarm
Mike Card
59:32
she must be 'light' enough to fly. the old Queen leaves
Ryan McDonnough
01:00:13
What i commented on has nothing to do with weight loss. The queen was piping. I thought that only virgin queens pipe to each other before doing battle. In this case, the queen was piping as a part of swarm preparation, as indicated by the previous slide.
Andrew Bray (he/him)
01:00:58
The old queen indeed also will pipe :)
Eric
01:01:47
Does the double spike of swarm calls in NY and Penn. have anything to do with lack of treatment in those areas versus down south?
martinaford
01:03:45
Curious what a ‘piping’ queen sounds like.
Susie Wilcox
01:04:07
google it and there’s recordings online
Workinger
01:04:09
bagpipes?
martinaford
01:04:26
Possible ring tone?
Ryan McDonnough
01:04:53
Look-up videos of piping on YouTube. Sounds like she tooting on a kazoo
Kristi
01:09:20
On the picture of the frame with 6 queen cells. After you have done one walk away, is it possible to successfully cut out a couple of queen cells and place them on a frame w/o queen cells but with nurse bees and brood to start another(3rd) hive. Assuming you have enough brood and resources to support them.
Jordan s.
01:11:41
I'm sorry I gotta leave. hope you're still in the meeting while i get back home
Ann C
01:12:02
How long can you leave a queenless hive without a purchased queen?
brucek
01:18:24
How many queen cells do you transfer to the nuc?
Ryan McDonnough
01:30:17
Grafted queen cells should be one per nuc. Swarm cells removed from parent colony should be only 1-2 per nuc to prohibit cast swarms. Wally Shaw has a good article on this.
Ryan McDonnough
01:30:50
If 2 cells into nuc, then they should be the same approximate age
Andrew Bray (he/him)
01:32:31
Dewey, I see your new book is available on multiple sites. Is there any particular site that gets a higher range of the payment into your pocket?
Andrew Bray (he/him)
01:34:00
Nice!!!
Ryan McDonnough
01:34:11
Can there be cast swarms if providing a nuc with more than 2 queen cells?
Andrew Bray (he/him)
01:34:16
It’s a deal, Dewey, I’m sold
Kevin Finn
01:34:17
When requeening an established colony with a purchased queen, how long would you keep the queen caged?
Ryan McDonnough
01:34:58
Thanks
blake wallace
01:35:36
How often is the queen unsuccessful or less successful when mating? How long would you let a new queen raised by the hive go before you pinch her and let the hive try again?
Kevin Finn
01:36:45
If a colony still has leftover stores is it still necessary to feed 1-1? Is it a better stimulant than stored honey/syrup?
Susie Wilcox
01:37:03
When you make a split is it best to move the box with the queen so the workers go back to the queen less box?
Brandi
01:37:39
Dewey, I missed the name of the swarm book you recommended, my pen died. Thank you!
Kristi
01:40:39
So are the qu
Susie Wilcox
01:41:27
THANKS Dewey!
Dewey Caron
01:41:31
steve repaski swarm essentials
Ryan McDonnough
01:41:46
Thanks, Dewey
Charles Loving
01:41:51
Great presentation! Thank you Dewey
martinaford
01:42:40
LOVE the piping queen video. So cool. Thanks!
Brandi
01:43:12
Thank you Dewey, very informative and helpful. 🙂
Dewey Caron
01:44:44
blake Wallace. The unsuccessful matings are related to a large number of variables. Some matings, some years are going to be unsuccessful but numbers most years (in spring summer) are pretty low <10% failures. Fall matings have greater failure rate.
Dewey Caron
01:48:58
Kevin sugar syrup a better stimulant than honey YES But pollen is the most positive stimulant followed by fresh nectar. Bees sometimes seem "hesitant" to use stored honey.
Dewey Caron
01:50:16
Ryan do not accept Wally Shaw as gospel. Bees do not seem to have a way to count how many queen cells they have in their hive. It is personal conjuncture by Wally. Conventional wisdom is not always conventional.
Kevin Finn
01:50:17
Thanks, Dewey!
Dewey Caron
01:52:28
Piping queens - thanks Andrew for reference. We wish we knew how to interpret piping (and response tooting). It occurs close to emergence of a swarm but may not have any relationship to the exodus itself. Neat to hear in a hive for sure.
Dewey Caron
01:55:44
Eric double spike in NY and PA - we speculate that yes it has to do with mite numbers getting high - could be due to non-treatment or simply some colonies rearing great numbers of mites despite whether we treat or not and of course using mite treatments that are ineffective (such as use of oxalic during the summer).
Brandi
01:57:28
Thanks Glen!!! Speaking my language with those plants!!! 👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼
Caroline Segsworth
01:57:30
Thanks very much Glen! Been curious where the pollen's been coming from lately
Susie Wilcox
01:57:43
Thanks Glen!
Ryan McDonnough
01:58:02
Thanks for that about Wally, Dewey
Scott McMullin
01:58:09
Thanks, Cheryl!
Dione.Fugere@mercer.com
01:58:15
Thank you!
Caroline Segsworth
01:58:17
Thanks!
Mike Card
01:58:19
thanks!!