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Bridgewater's African American and Native American Residents 1700 - 1850 - Shared screen with speaker view
Nadia Clancy
02:02:45
any possibilities that their lineage still exist today...(descendants)
Ward
02:03:30
Perhaps we should rename the Gates , the Ashport House, or at least the parking lot, if not Boyden itself.
Gandhy Ulysse
02:04:21
One hundred percent^
Maura Rosenthal she/her
02:04:33
Good idea, Ward. Thanks to my colleagues and wonderful neighbors for this program.
Nadia Clancy
02:05:33
what inspired you both to look into this area? I am sure there are countless of similar stories....
Laura Gross
02:06:29
About the history with the cotton-gin production— I heard that the cotton gin was invented by an African American, but Eli Whitney got credit for it. Do you have any info on that?
Emily Field (she)
02:06:45
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/10/04/when-black-history-is-unearthed-who-gets-to-speak-for-the-dead
Sally Fehervari
02:08:01
In Mansfield, we are preserving and researching a colonial era cemetery, which does include the enslaved by the Leonard family. Would love to hook up. My email is sgfehervari@gmail.com. 508-241-2948
Deborah Drago
02:08:36
Thank you to Dr. Field and Dr. Huff, I appreciate it! Bridgewater is my hometown and learning this history is so interesting about the Gate House land. I look forward to reading some of the books you cited. Take Care everyone!!
Emily Field (she)
02:08:47
Thanks, Sally!
Minna Heilpern
02:11:11
Thank you for this informative session. It is breathtaking to me that this part of our New England history was never taught to us as children or college students. Thank you for bringing it to the forefront of our awareness so that our full history can be known.
Emily Field (she)
02:12:33
Thank you, Emily! You are amazing!
Nadia Clancy
02:15:38
WE (Community Coalition for Change) would love to know what you have discovered there? East Bridgewater
Emily Field (she)
02:16:57
@Nadia—yes! Love to connect. We have marked which records came from East Bridgewater.
Joyce Rain Anderson Bridgewater State (she/her/hers)
02:17:03
Maine was part of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts until 1820, so not surprising families would move there.
jenise
02:17:12
My grandfather, Henry Mann was a pullman porter and owned land in Bridgewater
Steve Rogan
02:17:12
I have been sharing Bridgewater history on Facebook. Visit https://www.facebook.com/bridgewaterhistory to see history or to share history you may have.
Rachel Tedesco (she/her)
02:19:53
I'm interested in listening to more great lectures like this.
Emily Cuff
02:20:20
Thank you Dr. Field and Dr. Huff. You two are amazing!!!
Deborah Drago
02:20:27
Debbie Drago- MRISJ- ddrago@bridgew.edu
Emily Field (she)
02:20:34
https://massachusetttribe.org/ has a lot of interesting history about the Massachusett people at Ponkapoag.
jenise
02:21:00
I am interested, Jenise Campbell-Means, jenise45@comcast.net
carlton
02:21:03
I forgot to mention the 12 other historic cemeteries in Bridgewater where other Africans and indigenous people my be interred. Probably a story from each of them.
M. Zimmerman
02:21:23
Thank you both, Emily and Jamie, for a wonderful presentation!
Justin Means
02:21:55
I am interested on being updated Justin Means jmeans1155@gmail.com
Minna Heilpern
02:21:55
Thank you Dr. Field and Dr. Huff for sharing your knowledge with us, and Becky and BCCR for bringing this wonderful webinar to all of us!
Christina Nordstrom
02:22:07
Thank you so much for this fascinating program. I look forward to future presentations. (I trace my heritage to the Washburns as well.)
Rachel Tedesco (she/her)
02:22:07
And my email is revrayted@comcast.net. Sorry, forgot to put that in my comment above.
James Leone
02:23:26
Wonderful talk, thank you!
Eileen Estudante
02:23:41
Thank you Dr. Field and Dr. Huff for a very informative and engaging presentation! I so appreciate the work you have done in discovering al of these layers of information and sharing it with us!
Emily Field (she)
02:23:51
It’s also true that many of these records are available on Google Books for free! The Vital Records of Bridgewater and Epitaphs in Old Bridgewater
Cat Stewart
02:23:57
Thank you! This was great!
Valerie Bassett
02:24:06
Thank you!
adriana
02:24:28
I’m viewing this from Richmond, Virginia and found it very informative and interesting.
Erik Moore (he/him)
02:24:38
Thank you. Great presentation!
Minna Heilpern
02:25:17
Is it possible to send this slide with the resources to everyone?
Valerie Bassett
02:25:38
Great book by Little Compton Historical Society: If Jane Should be Sold- about indentured and enslaved people in LC, RI
Emily Field (she)
02:25:43
Hartman, Sadiya. “Venus in Two Acts.” small axe 26, vol. 12, no. 2, 2008, pp. 1–14.Lepore, Jill. “When Black History is Unearthed, Who Gets to Speak for the Dead?” The New Yorker, 27 September 2021.Melish, Joanne Pope. Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and ‘Race’ in New England, 1780–1860.Mitchell, Koritha. From Slave Cabins to the White House: Homemade Citizenship in African American Culture. University of Illinois Press, 2020.O’Brien, Jean M. Firsting and Lasting: Writing Indians Out of Existence in New England. University of Minnesota Press, 2010.Barbara Y. Welke, Law and the Borders of Belonging in the Long Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Brenda Molife
02:25:58
Thank you. Really informative!
Gandhy Ulysse
02:26:32
Thank you all, great presentation!
adriana
02:26:47
Signing off. Thank you!!
Nadia Clancy
02:26:50
Thank you...this was so educational...looking forward to know more about your research because feeling welcomed is so important...especially now knowing that we had people of color paving the way.
Matthew Rushton
02:27:12
Thank you!
Amelia
02:27:31
Loved this forum!
Krystal Green BSU
02:28:14
Thank you for sharing everyone have a good night
Emily Field (she)
02:28:52
@Nadia—thank you! That is one of the things that is most important to us. One thing that got me interested in this was the way my students of color at BSU reported feeling unwelcome in town.
Rachel Tedesco (she/her)
02:28:59
For preservation funds I'd look to the Mass Historical Society.
Steve Rogan
02:29:24
Reach out to your local Cultural Council for funding
Nadia Clancy
02:29:51
steve rogan how about local library....for funding
Steve Rogan
02:30:48
Not sure about local libraries, but Cultural Council grants can be used for funding projects like tis
Emily Field (she)
02:32:15
National Trust Preservation might be somewhere to look
M. Zimmerman
02:32:26
There are also non-profits which do preservation and restoration of cemeteries, such as Rediscovering History (https://rediscovering-history.com/);
M. Zimmerman
02:32:40
https://www.preservationmass.org/ is also a possible source as well.