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"Thoreau in a Time of Loss" - Shared screen with speaker view
Michael Frederick
21:10
"Welcome to Thoreau in a Time of Loss." Today's session is part of "There is more day to dawn." "A Global Conversation Celebrating Thoreau's Lasting Legacy," sponsored by The Thoreau Society, June 13 and 14: https://www.thoreausociety.org/event/webinars
Michael Frederick
23:24
Dear Attendees: Please send your questions and comments. We will have a Q and A period at 1:40 PM.
Michael Frederick
25:16
You can support the webinar series, renew your membership, or become a new member at https://thoreausociety.westcambridge.net/more-day-2020/
Natasha Shabat
26:18
Kristen, could you repeat the books that you mentioned?
Michael Frederick
27:28
Correction: Q and A will start at 2:40 PM. Start texting your questions now. I will place them in a que. Mike Frederick
David Zuba
30:13
In my recent Bachelor's thesis paper I talked about nature's influence on Thoreau's writing and I found it beautiful how he equated the death of a leaf after fluttering down from its branches to the death of man. How both, in life and death, continue their symbiotic relationship as the leaf gives life to the soil after its death and how man does likewise.
Robin Bonner
30:31
What would Thoreau think of On Tryanny by Timothy Styles (2017)?
Brian Bartlett
36:24
Audrey, were you suggesting that in his final years Thoreau was “pessimistic” about the loss of his country ever being reversed?
Brian Bartlett
37:12
Did he also write out of hope?
Natasha Shabat
38:35
I've lost my hometown of Minneapolis.
Natasha Shabat
42:41
"The world is wider than our viewS of it."
VICTOR CURRAN
43:14
The tide of the Civil War didn’t turn in favor of the North until after HDT’s death. He may have assumed the South would prevail.
Jan Hokeš
44:34
How far was the peaceful way Thoreau died influenced by the chemical changes caused by tuberculosis?
Natasha Shabat
45:19
Jan Hokes great question!
Michael Frederick
46:41
Since we're not using the Zoom Q and A feature, please text your questions to CHAT.
Gordon Andersson
49:39
Comment on HDT "lose yourself to the world to find yourself" to Jesus teaching in Gospels. What influence might there have been, and reconstructed?
Natasha Shabat
50:42
Kristen what was the date of that journal entry?
Robin Bonner
51:45
James Baldwin?
Geoff Wisner
52:12
I'd be interested to hear your reactions to this passage, which seems very relevant to the current protests against police violence and the role of the police in enforcing racial oppression. John Brown seems a figure who accepted the loss of his own life to redeem his country.Oct. 19, 1859. It galls me to listen to the remarks of craven-hearted neighbors who speak disparagingly of Brown because he resorted to violence, resisted the government, threw his life away! -what way have they thrown their lives, pray ? -neighbors who would praise a man for attacking singly an ordinary band of thieves or murderers. Such minds are not equal to the occasion. They preserve the so-called peace of their community by deeds of petty violence every day. Look at the policeman'sbilly and handcuffs! Look at the jail! Look at the gallows! Look at the chaplain of the regiment! We are hoping only to live safely on the outskirts of this provisional army. So they defend themselves and our hen-roosts, and maintain slavery.
David Zuba
53:18
Jan, I don't believe tuberculosis influenced Thoreau's death because he found a sort of beauty and renewal with death thanks to man and nature's symbiotic relationship. I think Thoreau saw his death like the death of a tree's leaves falling to the earth and rejuvenating the Earth.
Beth Baker
01:01:23
As I sit here in Alaska, a moose just walked past my window and went to drink in my creek.
Geoff Wisner
01:05:35
I'd also recommend reading Audrey's book When I Came to Die to understand grief in Thoreau's life.