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Jorge Ochoa Talk - Shared screen with speaker view
Gerry Hans (FoGP)
25:35
Now and then, nothing regular, Sue. Watch our calendar and sign up for email notifications.
debbiespinelli
44:07
What kind of bird?
Gerry Hans (FoGP)
45:22
lesser goldfinch, I think
Elaine
49:09
Are all the fruits poisonous to humans?
Gerry Hans (FoGP)
51:22
We'll answer questions when Jorge is finished. Feel free to ask now or later in the chat!
Elaine
53:16
Thank you.
carol she/her/they
59:25
I want a calender or booklet of your photos
Linda Ginn
01:03:59
Are all these plants perennials? Does GP have native annuals?
Lauren Rios Tolano
01:07:39
that is an amazing photo mr. ocha!
Betina Papadeas
01:08:43
Aside from the tennis ball example, what are some other examples of how human activities affect fruit consumption by wildlife and thus, seed dispersal?
sarajo frieden
01:14:20
Thank you so much!
debbiespinelli
01:14:47
Thank you Jorge and Gerry! Wonderful
sarajo frieden
01:15:21
New meaning now to “Purple Rain” in GP!
Elaine
01:16:36
Thank you.
Robert Roy van de Hoek
01:16:50
Have you seen the native Band-tailed Pigeon in Griffith Park? And if so, have you seen our native pigeon eat acorns of oaks? Do you think that our native pigeon could be dispersing acorns too, alongside our native jay and native woodpecker?
Kathryn Louyse
01:17:00
If you’ve never taken a hike with Jorge, it’s well worth it!
Elaine
01:18:33
Curious if these plants will be grown in the nursery that is being built in Calabasas that will be planted on the Wallis Annenberg Wildlife Crossing?
Lauren Rios Tolano
01:18:43
what other obsevations and conclusions did you find studying the wildlife at the park
Kathryn Louyse
01:19:29
I've tried the cherry… it has a huge pit, and while the fruit was somewhat tasty, it wasn't a lot. I did toss the pit onto the ground, btw.
sarajo frieden
01:19:43
I saw quail up in coastal live oak— earlier today
sarajo frieden
01:21:13
Mr. Ochoa, when’s your next hike?
Robert Roy van de Hoek
01:21:31
Thanks, Gerry & Jorge.
Elaine
01:23:17
Is it possible for participants to receive the recording. I wasn't able to get the correct spelling of all the plants. Thank you.
Betina Papadeas
01:25:17
Since weeds impact the seed dispersal of native plants, how are non-native plants being addressed, especially those planted by individuals? For example, someone recently planted 3-4 young avocado trees on a main hiking trail juncture. How is this type of activity being managed/handled?
Lauren Rios Tolano
01:25:22
what is a cubby
Kathryn Louyse
01:26:02
we were hiking in the area near the Old Zoo and came across a covey of quail…
Robert Roy van de Hoek
01:29:39
"Uphill Planters" is a phrase coined more than 100 years ago for jays bringing acorns to new locations uphill, and why oak trees occur on slopes. However, Gravity and the curved (round) shape of acorns suggests that acorns can only roll downhill, so all oak trees would be at the base of hills and slopes according to logic and common sense. Thoreau, approximately 200 years ago observed and noted that the eastern jays of Massachusetts carried acorns in their beaks and would stop at a stone wall of a farm boundary to perch for a moment before considering where to cache the acorn in the soil. And at times, the acorn slips from the beak of the jay, and gravity brings the acorn to the soil at the base of the wall. When this occurs, the jay does not pick up the acorn, but instead flies back to an oak tree to gather another acorn. And this explains why we see oak trees along fences.
carol she/her/they
01:30:34
see you on your next hike Jorge- Irma
Christine Atkinson
01:30:38
Thank you so much for the great talk!
sarajo frieden
01:33:17
Thank you for such a great talk!
carol
01:33:17
thank you. that was fascinating
Adrine Arakelian
01:33:19
Thank you for a great talk!
Carol Ayres
01:33:20
Thank you so much! Wonderful talk.
Betina Papadeas
01:33:20
Thank you so much. Good Evening All!
Elaine
01:33:21
Thank you, great talk. I learned a lot.
Merigan
01:33:25
Thank you!
Julian Alonso
01:33:29
Thank you!