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Hagley Conference: Capitalism and the Senses - Shared screen with speaker view
Ben Spohn
53:11
Good morning everyone. If you can change your display name to the same name you registered with, that would be tremendously helpful for us and help us prevent Zoom bombings and generate an accurate tally of attendees. Thanks.
Ben Spohn
01:50:33
Char is now open! If you can change your display name to the same name you registered with, that would be tremendously helpful for us and help us prevent Zoom bombings and generate an accurate tally of attendees. Thanks.
Ben Spohn
01:50:43
*Chat
Claire O'Mahony
01:55:31
Many thanks for such an thought-provoking session, particularly welcome to have multiple sensory systems explored. Might the panelists tell us more about how their research approaches ways in which sensorial registers intersect; the first and last paper spoke to how smell and taste intermingle, how might other senses have informed understandings of sound and touch explored in the other two papers?
Host (500)
01:55:38
Can panelists comment on sensory clash (my term) or competition and if researchers try to find the best sense to appeal to? (I am struck by Ingemar's image with the mysterious X box)
Colin Fanning
02:19:14
Thank you to all the panelists for your talks! A question for Grace in particular: I think your call for embodied research as an integral method in history (design or otherwise) to get away from notions of the “universal” is really resonant and valuable. Your example of Lamb primarily focuses on design as construed by a designer’s work, skills, expertise, etc., so I’m curious if you could comment a bit on the other side of the equation as well—what do you see as the particular value of embodied methods to get at the less well-documented or -preserved experiences of design in the contexts of consumption and use? Does that framework need to change/adapt/expand or lean on other kinds of interpretive tools when an inquiry has less support from the institutionalized apparatus of archives, cataloguing, publications, etc. that tends to accompany design in professional contexts?