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FESPA Coffee Break: What does the massive range of digitally printed products mean to a leading Creative Branding Agency?
In this Coffee Break, Graeme Richardson-Locke FESPA’s Technical Support Manager is joined by Bryan Edmondson from SEA in London who make great use of creative bespoke print. Their work for a host of well-known brands is characterised by clear purposeful design, articulated through refined typography, graphics and photography. Importantly, print plays a key role in how these messages are made physical and memorable. The range of products on the print menu are of course huge and any creative is challenged to understand the specifics that result in the perfect job. Our conversation will look at what a creative agency like SEA needs from the printing supply chain to provide the assurance that they’ll deliver exciting, durable and useful results.

Mar 2, 2021 11:00 AM in London

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Speakers

Bryan Edmondson
Founder and Creative Director @SEA
Bryan Edmondson is a British graphic designer and founder of the renowned design consultancy SEA. He studied graphic design at Newcastle Polytechnic, then took roles at Roundel, Williams & Phoa and Imagination. He founded SEA in 1996 and the studio quickly established an enviable reputation for its work in brand identity and strategy and for an impeccable standard of art direction. Over the past 20 years SEA has worked across a variety of sectors, from luxury and lifestyle brands to cultural institutions that seek uncluttered communication and transformation through design, including Jamie Oliver, Matthew Williamson, EMI, GF Smith, City&Guilds, adidas/Porsche, W Hotel, Christies, Monotype, Google and Nokia. SEA took on an immense rebrand of Monotype, as well as the development of its Pencil to Pixel installations in both London and New York, and the creation of the company’s new London HQ in collaboration with Ben Adams Architects in 2016.