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Prostate Cancer Prevention and Treatment: An Integrative Approach
In this webinar, Dr. Donald Abrams, integrative oncologist at UCSF and editor of the book Integrative Oncology, will review the benefits of an integrative approach in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common malignant diagnosis in men, and lifestyle behaviors seem to impact its development.

In addition, once a diagnosis of prostate cancer has been made, lifestyle choices may alter outcomes. This often indolent disease, with its long overall survival, provides a unique opportunity for men to explore diet and other behavioral interventions. Typical treatments, such as surgery, radiation, and hormone therapy, can all produce physical and psychological side effects that may be helped by complementary therapies.

In this webinar, you will learn about:

- The role of a plant-based diet and regular physical activity in reducing the risk of prostate cancer
- The role of integrative therapies and lifestyle choices in the management of prostate cancer
- Whether supplements can be useful
- The benefits of acupuncture
- The potential of mind-body interventions to reduce stress associated with living with a cancer diagnosis

This webinar will take place on Thursday, June 24 at 11 AM PST / 2 PM EST.

Jun 24, 2021 11:00 AM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Donald I. Abrams, M.D. is the past chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, an integrative oncologist at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine.
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Speakers

Donald I. Abrams M.D.
Integrative Oncologist, UCSF Osher Center, Former President of the Society for Integrative Oncology
Donald I. Abrams, M.D. is the past chief of the Hematology-Oncology Division at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, an integrative oncologist at the UCSF Osher Center for Integrative Medicine and Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco. He graduated from Brown University in 1972 and from the Stanford University School of Medicine in 1977. After completing an Internal Medicine residency at the Kaiser Foundation Hospital in San Francisco, he became a fellow in Hematology-Oncology at the UCSF Cancer Research Institute in 1980 during the time that the first cases of AIDS were diagnosed. He was one of the original clinician/investigators to recognize many of the early AIDS-related conditions. He conducted numerous clinical trials investigating conventional as well as complementary therapies in patients with HIV including therapeutic touch, Traditional Chinese Medicine interventions, medicinal mushrooms, medical cannabis and distant healing.