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Writing Historical Fiction: Margaret Verble in conversation with Roxana Robinson, Bobbie Ann Mason, and Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
Each of the fascinating protagonists in these novels set from the 1860s to the 1960s and beyond navigate challenges of morality, political and social divides, culture clashes, family alliances, and destiny. Learn how these authors look to the past while writing poignant content for the present.

Nov 10, 2020 07:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Margaret Verble and Roxana Robinson
Margaret Verble is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Her first novel, “Maud’s Line,” was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Lexington, Kentucky. ************************************************** Roxana Robinson is the author of more than ten books; short story collections; and the biography “Georgia O’Keeffe: A Life.” Her work has appeared in numerous publications. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, and she was president of the Authors Guild from 2014 to 2017. She teaches in the Hunter College MFA program and divides her time among New York, Connecticut, and Maine.
Bobbie Ann Mason and Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
Bobbie Ann Mason is the author of a number of works of fiction, including “The Girl in the Blue Beret,” “In Country,” and more. The groundbreaking “Shiloh and Other Stories” won the PEN Hemingway Award and was shortlisted for many awards. Her memoir, “Clear Springs,” was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She has won two Southern Book Awards and numerous other prizes, including the O. Henry and the Pushcart. ************************************************** Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle, an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI), holds degrees from Yale University and the College of William and Mary. Her work “Going to Water” won the Morning Star Award for Creative Writing from the Native American Literature Symposium and was a finalist for the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction. She is coeditor of the Journal of Cherokee Studies and serves on the board of trustees for the North Carolina Writers' Network.