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IAOP 2021- Monday 21 June (Day 1 of 5)
Lecture- Cancer Immunology
Speakers-
Professor Gareth Thomas (University of Southampton, UK)
Dr Martin Forster (University College of London)


BSOMP Slide Seminar- Sinonasal Pathology
Panel-
Dr Bill Barrett (Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead, UK)
Dr Justin Bishop (UT Southwestern Medical Centre, USA)
Dr Mary Toner (Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland)

Jun 21, 2021 01:00 PM in London

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Speakers

Dr Martin Foster
@University College of London
Dr Martin Forster is an Associate Professor at UCL) and Consultant Medical Oncologist at UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. He specialises in Thoracic and Head & Neck cancers and has a particular interest in drug development, running a broad portfolio of studies from First-In-Human to registration Phase III trials. He is Joint Lead for the Clinical Trials Theme of the CR UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence and chairs the NIHR Head & Neck Research Group. He runs a research-based practice, being Principal Investigator or Chief Investigator for over 50 early and late-phase clinical trials since his appointment to UCL in 2009. These include involvement in >10 trials involving immune checkpoint inhibitors, either as single agent or in combination with a number of academic immunotherapy studies in development. In addition, he is the UCH clinical lead for chemotherapy services and co-lead for the London Cancer Chemotherapy Expert Reference Group.
Professor Gareth Thomas
@University of Southampton
Professor Gareth Thomas is Chair of Experimental Pathology at the University of Southampton and a Consultant in Head and Neck Pathology. His laboratory focuses on the tumour immune microenvironment, particularly the role of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) in promoting tumour progression. The translational aspect of the work has an emphasis on mechanisms regulating CAF differentiation and interactions with immune cells, identifying potential predictive biomarkers and druggable targets to develop strategies to improve immunotherapy.