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Migration in the Mediterranean and beyond
UK EVENT

A panel discussion with David Abulafia (Cambridge) and Peter Frankopan (Oxford), Donatella Strangio (Sapienza) chaired by Chris Wickham (BSR; Oxford)

From the movement of peoples across land and sea in the ancient, medieval and early modern periods, to the migrant crisis at Lampedusa, the Mediterranean has been the stage for cultural interconnection, conflict and displacement for millennia. Join David Abulafia, Peter Frankopan and Donatella Strangio in a panel discussion chaired by Chris Wickham, as they explore how patterns of movement in the Mediterranean region reflect changes taking place deep within the continental landmasses that meet there.
David Abulafia is Professor Emeritus of Mediterranean History at the University of Cambridge and an alumnus of the BSR. In 2013 he was awarded one of three inaugural British Academy Medals for his work on Mediterranean history and in 2020, he was awarded the Wolfson History Prize for The Boundless Sea: A Human History of the Oceans (Allen Lane 2019).
Peter Frankopan is Professor of Global History at Oxford University, where he is Senior Research Fellow at Worcester College, Oxford and Stavros Niarchos Foundation Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. He is Associate Director of the Programme for Silk Roads Studies at King's College, Cambridge, and an acclaimed author and broadcaster.
Donatella Strangio is Professor of Economic History at the Sapienza University of Rome. She is a specialist on financial history, development economics and the history of tourism, author of titles including Italy-China Trade Relations: A Historical Perspective (Springer 2020) and co-editor of Migration in the Mediterranean: Socio-economic Perspectives (Routledge 2016) and Economic and Social Perspectives on European Migration (Routledge 2020).

Jun 22, 2021 05:00 PM in London

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