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Bias and the Brain: How Racial Bias Affects Thinking and Learning
Recent research emerging from neuroscience and social psychology demonstrates that good people with stated desires to be fair and equitable nevertheless often perpetuate racial bias that can create inequalities. How?

Implicit bias is the brain’s automatic, instant association of stereotypes or attitudes toward particular groups, often without our conscious awareness. In short, we tell ourselves stories, automatically, about every person we encounter. Such stories generally reflect the bias of society––aversion to society’s out-groups and preferences for society’s in-groups. And these stories impact how we treat people and therefore how they experience life.

Implicit biases, if unchecked, cause good people not to live up to their values of treating everyone fairly. As a result, entire schools too easily become bastions of unintended exclusion. To disrupt these processes and therefore the inequities they give rise to, we have to take proactive, conscious steps. We have to tell better stories! And the good news is we can!

This session is a crash course in the latest research on why belonging matters to all of us and especially children, how bias works, what it takes to be allies who tell better stories and break the link between bias and behavior––and how we can support our children in developing these important skills.

Feb 1, 2022 07:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Jason Craige Harris
Senior Advisor @Perception Institute
Jason Craige Harris is a Senior Advisor at Perception Institute. Jason is a leading voice for organizational healing and societal transformation. As a mediator, educator, circle keeper, and strategic advisor, he consults in a variety of contexts, with a wide range of constituents, across industries, including government, business, media, nonprofit, education, and religion, to promote compassion, justice, and belonging. For over a decade, Jason has held senior roles in various organizations. He was a senior administrator at a K-12 Quaker school in NYC where he oversaw diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives, co-led the school’s peace, equity, and justice department, and taught courses at the intersection of ethics, history, human rights, and religious studies. Jason sits on the boards of Inwood Academy, Seeds of Peace, Hidden Water, and Getting to We. He is also a member of the advisory board of the Institute for Teaching Diversity and Social Justice.