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People-Powered Summer: The Power of the People to Vote

01:15:00

Jul 28, 2021 11:39 AM

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Speakers

Julie Fernandes
Associate Director for Institutional Accountability & Individual Liberty @Rockefeller Family Fund
Julie Fernandes is the Associate Director for Institutional Accountability and Individual Liberty at the Rockefeller Family Fund. Prior to joining the Fund, she served as Advocacy Director for Voting Rights and Democracy at the Open Society Foundations, as a Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice in the Obama administration, and as Special Assistant for Domestic Policy to President Bill Clinton. From 2002 to 2008, Ms. Fernandes was the Senior Counsel and Senior Policy Analyst at the Leadership Conference for Civil Rights, where she led federal advocacy efforts on a variety of issues, including the successful campaign to reauthorize the Voting Rights Act in 2006. Ms. Fernandes has testified before Congress and the UN Human Rights Council and has authored several research reports and magazine pieces primarily in the areas of voting rights and criminal justice reform.
Saskia Young
Associate Organizing Director @Indivisible
Based in Chicago, Saskia Young is currently the Associate Organizing Director for the Midwest and Distributed States for Indivisible and has been on the team there for nearly 2 years. Despite spending the past nearly 10 years working in organizing (beginning with working as a regional organizer for the 2012 Obama Presidential campaign), Saskia started her career in the entertainment industry, where she worked as an executive and production executive at studios like Paramount and Fox 2000. Prior to joining Indivisible, Saskia served as the National Field Director and then the Director of Swing Left Academy, in which she created a comprehensive online national training program.
Daniel Griffith
Legislative Counsel @Voting Rights Lab
Prior to his role as Legislative Counsel at Voting Rights Lab, Daniel Griffith served as a public defender, where he assisted thousands of clients through the systemic disadvantages faced by individuals in the criminal justice system. He has appeared before judges, juries, and appellate courts concerning the legality and fairness of the interpretation and application of criminal laws. Subsequently, Daniel maintained a substantial docket of court-appointed defense work as he transitioned into private practice. He graduated from Clemson University with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science and obtained his JD from the George Mason University School of Law (since renamed the Antonin Scalia Law School).