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Live Chat with Melodie Grubbs: Beaches as Buffers – Sea Level Rise Science to Adaptation?
Join AltaSea as we welcome Melodie Grubbs to talk about the sea level rising, and what that means for our future.

Melodie Grubbs, M.S., is a Science, Research & Policy Specialist at USC Sea Grant. As a coastal scientist, Ms. Grubbs is focused on helping communities prepare for and adapt to changing climate conditions, coastal hazards, and sea level rise. Ms. Grubbs specializes in physical coastal processes and dynamics, remote sensing, and geospatial analysis. Previously she served as the Director of Watershed Programs at The Bay Foundation where she developed, led, and implemented coastal habitat restoration and living shoreline projects. Ms. Grubbs also has experience at sea, serving as a scientist and chief mate on board an oceanographic research vessel.

Ms. Grubbs holds a M.S. in Geographic Information Science and Technology from USC and a B.S. in Meteorology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. At USC, her research focused on using remote sensing data to detect beach sediment changes associated with El Nino periods in Southern California.

Aug 14, 2020 12:00 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)

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Melodie Grubbs
Science, Research & Policy Specialist @USC Sea Grant
Melodie Grubbs, M.S., is a Science, Research & Policy Specialist at USC Sea Grant. As a coastal scientist, Ms. Grubbs is focused on helping communities prepare for and adapt to changing climate conditions, coastal hazards, and sea level rise. Ms. Grubbs specializes in physical coastal processes and dynamics, remote sensing, and geospatial analysis. Previously she served as the Director of Watershed Programs at The Bay Foundation where she developed, led, and implemented coastal habitat restoration and living shoreline projects. Ms. Grubbs also has experience at sea, serving as a scientist and chief mate on board an oceanographic research vessel. Ms. Grubbs holds a M.S. in Geographic Information Science and Technology from USC and a B.S. in Meteorology from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. At USC, her research focused on using remote sensing data to detect beach sediment changes associated with El Nino periods in Southern California.