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Burning House / Burning Horse by Ella Finer
Taking its starting point from Ella Finer's Burning House / Burning Horse, the three artists explore forceful forgetting. Finer’s work in sound and performance spans writing, composing, and curating with a particular interest in how women’s voices take up space; how bodies acoustically disrupt, challenge, or change the order of who is allowed to occupy—command—space.

02:35:00

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Speakers

Ella Finer
Ella Finer’s work in sound and performance spans writing, composing, and curating with a particular interest in how women’s voices take up space; how bodies acoustically disrupt, challenge, or change the order of who is allowed to occupy—command—space. Her research continuously queries the ownership of cultural expression through sound, with recent work supported by Onassis Stegi (Athens), FUTURA (Prague) and Gasworks (London). She is currently finishing her first book Acoustic Commons and the Wild Life of Sound. An updated introduction to Burning House / Burning Horse will be published in The Contemporary Journal this July 2022.
Jasminfire
JASMINFIRE. In an effort to preserve its life force energy, a living being will prioritize creating its own new rules for existing. As a trained musician I am hardwired to see and hear patterns and chords, which is why I find the orchestra of the forest so enchanting. My colors compete for your eyes the way plants compete for sunlight, yet those same colors rely on each other to create a harmonious end result the way plants communicate to send each other nutrients through their roots, creating their strong ecosystem. I am respectful of nature’s chaotic beauty and lawlessness. I have become fascinated with manipulating the properties of paint & textiles, assigning new utility while respecting physical boundaries and limitations.
SHEILA CHUKWULOZIE
SHEILA CHUKWULOZIE is a multimedia artist who believes the nature of Being|Body is always fragmented, remixed and therefore digital. By juxtaposing local rituals, modern technology, traditional myths, and movement styles, her practice battles the politics of “behaving oneself” in a Catholic-colonial body. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the Musée d’Art Moderne in Paris, the Delfina Foundation in London, and in art spaces and festivals across three continents. From 2017-2018, she travelled as a Thomas J Watson fellow studying with traditional mask makers and cloth weavers in eight African countries. Her installation “Thanks Xenophobia” was widely reviewed, including in Frieze, the Financial Times, and Artnet. Her latest film “Egungun” (directed by Olive Nwosu) was presented by Sundance, the British Film Institute, TIFF International film festival, and Aspen film festival.